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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Board On Behavioral Cognitive and Sensory Sciences
Board On Behavioral Cognitive and Sensory Sciences
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education




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Upcoming Events

Workshop
Committee on Developing a Behavioral and Social Science Research Agenda on AD/ADRD

October 17, 2019
9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Alzheimers smallLKeck Center of the National Academies
Room 208
500 5th Street, NW
Washington, DC

The Decadal Survey of Behavioral and Social Science Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementias will hold its second public workshop on October 17, 2019. The workshop will include discussions of commissioned papers. Following the commissioned paper discussions, there will be a panel discussion on measuring the effects of caregiving, then an hour-long public comment period in which individuals may make a brief (no longer than three minutes) comment related to the study.
 
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Biannual Meetings
Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences

Keck CenterFall Meeting 2019: November 20-21, NAS Building, 2101 Constitution Ave, NW



Spring Meeting 2020:
June 15-16, Washington, DC

Fall Meeting 2020: November 9-10, Washington, DC 

 

BBCSS is in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) of the The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
 

 
 

 

 


Recent Publications

Evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative

Minerva CoverLReleased in October 2019, this report discusses the program's successes and challenges over its first decade of operation, and highlights ways to strengthen the program’s foundations and take advantage of opportunities for broadening its reach and usefulness.

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Reproducibility and Replicability in Science

RR small coverReleased in May 2019, this Consensus Study Report offers definitions of reproducibility and replicability and examines the factors that may lead to non-reproducibility and non-replicability in research. While reproducibility is straightforward and should generally be expected, replicability is more nuanced, and in some cases a lack of replicability can aid the process of scientific discovery. The report provides recommendations to researchers, academic institutions, journals, and funders on steps they can take to improve reproducibility and replicability in science.

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A Decadal Survey of the Social and Behavioral Sciences: A Research Agenda for Advancing Intelligence Analysis

SBS Decadal coverLReleased in March 2019, this Consensus Study Report from the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences recommends that the intelligence community (IC) make sustained collaboration with researchers in the social and behavioral sciences (SBS) a key priority as it develops research objectives for the coming decade.

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How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures

HPL2 coverThis consensus study report from the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences and the Board on Science Education summarizes identifies new findings related to neurological processes involved in learning, individual and cultural variability related to learning, and educational technologies. In addition to expanding scientific understanding of the mechanisms of learning and how the brain adapts throughout the lifespan, there have been important discoveries about influences on learning, particularly sociocultural factors and the structure of learning environments.

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Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief
Behavioral Economics and the Promotion of Health Among Aging Populations

Behavioral EconomicsThis publication from the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences summarizes a workshop held June 2018 to discuss behavioral economics research and how to expand such research to be of benefit to older and middle-aged adults. The workshop looked at successful applications of the research; how to make them more effective; and focused on identifying approaches that could generate long-term benefits in areas of interest to the National Institute on Aging, such as decreasing sedentary behavior, promoting volunteering and social engagement, improving medical regimen adherence, and reducing inappropriate use of opioids and using opioids when medically necessary.

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