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Tuesday, July 29, 2014 
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   BECS - TOPICS

People-Environment Interactions

People and Climate Variation

People and Resource Decisions

People and Adaptation to Change

People, Risk, and Resilience

Research, Education, and Evaluation

Sustainability Science:
Can Earth’s and Society’s Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?


2101 Constitution Ave NW, Room 120
Washington DC 20418

30 September - 1 October 2013

Much public discourse presumes that it is possible to achieve a future Earth that not only supports 10 billion people, but does so with a better average standard of living than 7 billion have now (or at least with a lower level of inequity). This view is often promoted through discussion of bringing into balance the “three pillars” of sustainability—economic, social, and environmental. However, this social paradigm is not entirely in line with the natural science paradigm that holds that there are limits to consumption of ecosystem services by one species, which if crossed, lead to a collapse of system function. The Presidents of the National Academies, concerned that the social and natural sciences may not be contributing as much to solving societal problems as they might, have recently provided funding for this initial public workshop. This workshop, within a systems framework, will explicitly emphasize the integration of the social sciences and the natural sciences that will be required to achieve sustainability for a larger human population. It will examine key issues of population size, distribution, growth, aging, and differential consumption, as well as land and water use and climate change and their effects on availability of resources to achieve improved well-being for a larger number of people.

See the Agenda (contains links to abstracts and PowerPoints)


30-Sep, Session I. Introduction to the workshop: William Rouse



30-Sep, Session I. Introduction to the workshop: B. L. Turner II



30-Sep, Session I. Introduction to the workshop: DISCUSSION



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Character and magnitude of the challenges in 2050: W.G. Ernst



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Character and magnitude of the challenges in 2050: John Bongaarts



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Character and magnitude of the challenges in 2050: Andrew Jorgenson



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Character and magnitude of the challenges in 2050: Peter Marcotullio



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Character and magnitude of the challenges in 2050: DISCUSSION



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Consequences for the Earth system: Steve Polasky



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Consequences for the Earth system: Siwa Msangi



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Consequences for the Earth system: James A (Jae) Edmonds



30-Sep, Session II. Challenges to the Earth system: Consequences for the Earth system: DISCUSSION



30-Sep, Session SPECIAL PRESENTATION: John Casti



1-Oct, Session III. Conundrum: Branko Milanovic



1-Oct, Session III. Conundrum: Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue



1-Oct, Session III. Conundrum: Wolfgang Lutz



1-Oct, Session III. Conundrum: DISCUSSION



1-Oct, Session IV. Wicked problems: Lisa Berkman



1-Oct, Session IV. Wicked problems: Brian O'Neill



1-Oct, Session IV. Wicked problems: DISCUSSION



1-Oct, Session V. Interdisciplinary Research Agenda DISCUSSION


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