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Wednesday, September 3, 2014 
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   BOHSI - TOPICS

Health, Safety, and Performance

Human Centered Design

Industry and Workforce Staffing and Systems

Military and Government

Research and Evaluation

BOHSI Member Spotlight
From the January 2012 BOHSI Newsletter
 
 Nancy_Cooke
Nancy J. Cooke, Ph.D., BOHSI Chair
Professor, Cognitive Science and Engineering, Arizona State University
Science Director, Cognitive Engineering Research Institute

In this issue of the BOHSI quarterly newsletter we place the spotlight on Dr. Nancy Cooke, BOHSI's new chair. Dr. Cooke stepped into her new role as chair on January 1, 2012 (succeeding William Marras) but has been a valued member of BOHSI (formerly COHSI) since 2007.
 
What is your current position and area of research?
Professor, Cognitive Science and Engineering, Arizona State University
Science Director, Cognitive Engineering Research Institute

What led you to this field of research?

I enjoyed my psychology and computer science classes as an undergraduate, and when trying to decide where to go from there I went to career counseling and found human factors at the intersection of these two areas in a career index. I knew right away that human factors was the field for me. The events of 9/11 further motivated me to focus my work on complex systems issues and defense applications.

What has been the biggest change in human-systems integration during your career?

One of the biggest changes in the field of human factors that has helped to define human systems integration is the recognition that human-systems integration problems require a multidisciplinary team of specialists (e.g., cognitive psychologists, organizational psychologists, systems engineers, industrial designers, physical ergonomists, physicians, and domain experts to name a few).

What do you look forward to most about being the chair of BOHSI?

I will continue to enjoy the rich interactions with bright and energetic people on the board, at the organizations with which we interface, and at the NRC.

What is the most important thing you would like to see human-systems integration achieve in the next 10 years?

I would like for human-systems integration to be considered an essential process in systems design starting from the earliest system requirements and continuing through the design process.

What is your favorite book of all time?

Hutchins, E. (1995). Cognition in the Wild. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
 
 

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