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CLAJ - TOPICS

COMMITTEE ON IMPROVING EVALUATION OF ANTI-CRIME PROGRAMS
 

Project Scope

The purpose of this project is to foster broader implementation of credible evaluation methods in the field of criminal justice. The workshop will explore scientific criteria for selecting evaluation methods that are appropriate to the circumstances and constraints of the program or policy to which they are being applied. The resulting report will provide guidance for establishing and applying basic scientific principles and procedures to the evaluation of federally funded anti-crime programs.
 

Sponsor
National Institute of Justice

 

Committee Membership
Mark W. Lipsey (Chair),Center for Evaluation Research and Methodology, Vanderbilt University

John L. Adams,Statistics Group, RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA

Denise C. Gottfredson,Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park

John V. Pepper,Department of Economics, University of Virginia

David Weisburd,Criminology Department, Hebrew University Law School

 

Staff
Carol V. Petrie, Study Director

Ralph Patterson, Senior Program Assistant

 
Improving Evaluation of Anticrime Programs (2005)
   

 Anti Crime report cover

 Report

 

 

Although billions of dollars have been spent on crime prevention and control programs during the past decade, scientifically strong impact evaluations of these programs are uncommon in the context of the overall number of programs that have received funding. Improving Evaluation of Anticrime Programs is designed as a working guide for agencies and organizations responsible for program evaluation, for researchers who must design scientifically credible evaluations of government and privately sponsored programs, and for policy officials who are investing more and more in the concept of evidence-based policy to guide their decisions in crucial areas of crime prevention and control. 

 

 

 

 
   
   

 


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