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Friday, April 18, 2014 
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   CNSTAT - TOPICS

Coordinating and Sustaining Federal Statistics

Decennial Census and American Community Survey

Economic Measurement

Federal Household and Business Surveys

Health and Social Welfare

Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency

Science Technology and Innovation (STI) Indicators

Statistical Methods and Estimates for Policy Use

CNSTAT STAFF

 

Citro, Constance F., Director(202) 334-3009bio
Cohen, Michael L., Senior Program Officer(202) 334-2240bio
Cork, Daniel L., Senior Program Officer(202) 334-2573bio
Fealing, Kaye H., Senior Program Officer  (202) 334-2831bio
Gaskin, Agnes E., Administrative Assistant(202) 334-2240 
Habermann, Hermann, Senior Program Officer(703) 312-0429bio
House, Carol C., Senior Program Officer(202) 334-1573bio
Kirkendall, Nancy J., Senior Program Officer(202) 334-2303bio
Kisa-Shakeer, Julia, Financial Associate(202) 334-3290 
Mackie, Christopher D., Senior Program Officer(202) 334-2099bio
Mann, Anthony S., Program Associate(202) 334-3266 
Marton, Krisztina, Senior Program Officer(202) 334-3902bio
Sinha, Esha, Associate Program Officer(202) 334-3946bio
Siri, Michael J., Program Associate(202) 334-3113 
Sovde, Jacqui, Program Associate(202) 334-1616 
Spar, Edward J., Senior Program Officeroffsitebio
Wunderlich, Gooloo, Senior Program Officeroffsitebio

 

   

Constance F. Citro is director of the Committee on National Statistics, a position she has held since May 2004. She previously served as acting chief of staff (December 2003-April 2004) and as senior study director (1986-2003). She began her career with CNSTAT in 1984 as study director for the panel that produced The Bicentennial Census: New Directions for Methodology in 1990. Dr. Citro received her B.A. in political science from the University of Rochester, and M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from Yale University. Prior to joining CNSTAT, she held positions as vice president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and Data Use and Access Laboratories, Inc. She was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation/Census research fellow in 1985-1986, and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. For CNSTAT, she directed evaluations of the 2000 census, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, microsimulation models for social welfare programs, and the NSF science and engineering personnel data system, in addition to studies on institutional review boards and social science research, estimates of poverty for small geographic areas, data and methods for retirement income modeling, and a new approach for measuring poverty. She coedited the 2nd–5th editions of Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency, and contributed to studies on measuring racial discrimination, expanding access to research data, the usability of estimates from the American Community Survey, the National Children’s Study research plan, and the Census Bureau’s 2010 census program of experiments and evaluations.

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Michael L. Cohen is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. He is currently serving as study director, or co-study director, for the Workshop on Future Directions for the National Science Foundation National Patterns of Research and Development, and for the Panel on the Theory and Application of Reliability Growth Methods to Defense Systems. He was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor at the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer in statistics at Princeton University. His general area of interest is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular focus in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. and Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.

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Daniel L. Cork is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as study director of the Panel to Review the 2010 Census and the Workshop on the Benefits (and Burdens) of the American Community Survey. From September 2012 to January 2013 he is serving a detail to the Statistical and Science Policy Office at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. He joined the CNSTAT staff in 2000, and has served as study director or program officer for several CNSTAT census panels, including the Panels on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, Research on Future Census Methods (2010 Planning panel), Design of the 2010 Census Program of Experiments and Evaluations, and Review of the 2000 Census. He also directed CNSTAT’s Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (in cooperation with the Committee on Law and Justice) and was senior program officer for the Panel on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice and the National Materials Advisory Board). His research interests include quantitative criminology, geographical analysis, Bayesian statistics, and statistics in sports. He holds a B.S. in statistics from George Washington University, an M.S. in statistics, and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Kaye Husbands Fealing is a senior program director at the National Academies’ Committee on National Statistics. She is on leave from the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, where she is a professor in the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy. Prior to teaching at the Humphrey School, she was the William Brough professor of economics at Williams College, where she began her teaching career in 1989. Dr. Husbands Fealing developed the National Science Foundation’s Science of Science and Innovation Policy program and co-chaired the Science of Science Policy Interagency Task Group. At NSF, she also served as an economics program director. Dr. Husbands Fealing was a visiting scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Technology Policy and Industrial Development, where she conducted research on NAFTA’s impact on the Mexican and Canadian automotive industries, and research on strategic alliances between aircraft contractors and their subcontractors. Dr. Husbands Fealing received the distinction of Teacher of the Year for academic years 2008-09 and 2009-10 from the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. She serves on review panels and boards at the National Science Foundation and is a member of the AAAS Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She co-edited the The Science of Science Policy: A Handbook, with Julia Lane, John H. Marburger III and Stephanie Shipp. Dr. Husbands Fealing has a B.A. in mathematics and economics from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

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Hermann Habermann joined the CNSTAT staff in September 2009 as a senior program officer, working part-time to organize a workshop on enhancing research and development for the federal statistical system. He has held several positions in his career, including deputy director of the U.S. Census Bureau, director of the United Nations Statistics Division, and chief of statistical policy at the Office of Management and Budget. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the National Academy of Public Administration and a past member of CNSTAT. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. At present he consults for various international organizations including the United Nations and the World Bank.

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Carol C. House is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. She is currently serving as study director for the project to review redesign options for the Consumer Expenditure surveys. She retired from the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), USDA, in 2010 where she was deputy administrator for programs and products and chair of the Agricultural Statistics Board. Her previous positions at NASS included associate administrator, director of research and development, and director of survey management. She has provided statistical consulting on sample surveys in China, Poland, Columbia, and the Dominican Republic. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. Her graduate training was in mathematics at the University of Maryland, College Park.
 
 

Nancy J. Kirkendall joined the staff of the Committee on National Statistics as a senior program officer in May 2009. Currently, she is study director for the Panel on Using the ACS to Estimate the Percent of Children Eligible for the School Meals Program. She is also assisting with the Panel on Redesigning the Commercial and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys of the Energy Information Administration. Dr. Kirkendall served as director of the Statistics and Methods Group, Energy Information Administration (EIA), and as a member of EIA’s senior staff from 2002-2008. She has held a variety of other positions in EIA. From 1996 to 1999 Dr. Kirkendall served as senior mathematical statistician in the Statistical Policy Branch, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget. There she also served as the desk officer for the US Bureau of Census, the chair of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology, and led a variety of interagency activities. She taught part-time at the George Washington University in the statistics department from 1978-1996 and in the engineering management and systems engineering department from 1996-2002. She is a past vice president of the American Statistical Association and a past president of the Washington Statistical Society. She received the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics in 2007, the American Statistical Association’s Founder’s Award in 2001, and was awarded the status of fellow of the American Statistical Association in 1993. Dr. Kirkendall is a member of the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Energy Statistics and the Accreditation Implementation Committee. She holds a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from George Washington University, and bachelors and masters degrees in mathematics from Ohio State University.

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Christopher Mackie is a study director with the Committee on National Statistics specializing in economic measurement and statistics. He is currently serving as study director for two expert panels, one charged with assessing the value of measures of self-reported well-being for policy, and another on measuring civic engagement and social cohesion. He has served as study director for a range of projects, including those that produced the reports At What Price? Conceptualizing and Measuring Cost-of-Living and Price Indexes; Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States; Understanding Business Dynamics: an Integrated Data System for America’s Future; Accounting for Health and Health Care: Approaches to Measuring the Sources and Costs of Their Improvement; and Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. He is also author of Canonizing Economic Theory: How Theories and Ideas Are Selected in Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of North Carolina, and has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and Tulane University.

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Krisztina Marton is a senior program officer with the Committee on National Statistics. She is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Addressing Priority Technical Issues for the American Community Survey and will lead CNSTAT’s contribution to the Committee on Human Spaceflight. She is also organizing an expert meeting on more efficient screening methods for the Health and Retirement Study of the National Institute on Aging. Previously, she was the study director for the Panel on the Statistical Methods for Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the American Community Survey, the Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys of the Energy Information Administration, and the Workshop on the Future of Federal Household Surveys. Prior to joining CNSTAT, she was a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research (MPR) where she conducted methodological research and oversaw data collections for the National Science Foundation, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other clients. Previously, she was a survey director in the Ohio State University Center for Survey Research. She has a Ph.D. in communication with an interdisciplinary specialization in survey research from the Ohio State University.
 

  

Esha Sinha joined the Committee on National Statistics as associate program officer on July 27, 2009. Previously she worked extensively with SUNY Binghamton student records on such topics as whether advanced placement or SAT scores are better predictors of college success and performance of transfer students. She earned her M.A. in economics from GIPE, India, and worked for a year as research assistant in the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, before attending SUNY Binghamton. She recently completed a Ph.D. in economics at SUNY Binghamton under the direction of former CNSTAT study director Prof. Edward C. Kokkelenberg.

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Edward J. Spar is currently a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. He recently retired as the executive director of the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics (COPAFS). Prior to his position at COPAFS, he was president of Market Statistics; vice president for Mathematics and Systems, for the Daniel Starch & Staff market-media research firm; and a senior analyst at Computer Usage Corporation. Mr. Spar has taught a graduate course in applied demography at Georgetown University. He currently teaches a course at the U.S. Census Bureau on using economic statistics in the private sector. Mr. Spar has consulted for such organizations as the United Nations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Census Bureau, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, and the National Statistical Committee of Kyrgyzstan. Mr. Spar worked closely with the U.S. Census Bureau in the development of their COMPASS series of publications, explaining the uses of the American Community Survey to various user communities. Mr. Spar has published numerous articles on the development and uses of demographic data and has presented papers to such organizations as the Market Research Council, the American Statistical Association, the International Statistical Institute, the American Marketing Association, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the International Association of Official Statistics. Mr. Spar has testified before Congress on issues relating to the quality and timeliness of federal statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and the International Union for the Scientific Studies of Population, and a life member of the Market Research Council. He served on the National Research Council’s Panel on Transportation Statistics. Mr. Spar received his BBA in statistics from the City College of New York.
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Gooloo S. Wunderlich is a senior program officer at the Committee on National Statistics. She has over 50 years of experience at the program and policy levels in health and population policy analysis, research, and statistics in the U. S. Public Health Service, President’s National Advisory Commission on Rural Poverty, the Bureau of the Census, and at the National Academies. Her professional interests and experience have focused on the conduct and analysis of national health surveys, analysis and public policy formulation relating to population research, family planning, aging, long-term care, disability, and a wide range of health policy issues. At the National Academies she has served as study director for numerous projects including: Measuring Medical Care Economic Risk, the workshop on Improving the Health Care Cost Projections for the Medicare Population, the workshop on Improving the Measurement of Late-Life Disability, Review of the National Children’s Study Research Plan, USDA’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger in the United States, the Future of Rural Health, the Social Security Administration’s Disability Decision Process Research, Improving the Quality of Long-Term, Adequacy of Nurse Staffing in Hospitals and Nursing Homes, and the National Health Care Survey. Prior to joining the National Academies she was director of the Division of Data Policy, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health in the Department of Health and Human Services, serving for many years as the focus throughout the Public Health Service for data policy development, planning, analysis, coordination of health information systems, and statistical activities. She directed the review and approval of statistical, research, evaluation, administrative, and regulatory data collection activities throughout the Public Health Service agencies. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. She received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Bombay, India, and has completed two years of post-doctoral studies in sociology and demography at the University of Minnesota and the University of Chicago.

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