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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

 

New CNSTAT Logo
 

 — May 23, 2017 — 

 

 People News 


We congratulate Rita Colwell, distinguished university professor at the University of Maryland College Park and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, senior advisor and chairman emeritus at Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc., and founder and chairman at CosmosID, Inc., on receiving the 2017 Vannevar Bush Award. Established by the National Science Board in 1980 in memory of Vannevar Bush, who served as a science advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt during World War II, helped to establish federal funding for science and engineering as a national priority during peacetime, and helped create the National Science Foundation, this award honors truly exceptional lifelong leaders in science and technology who have made substantial contributions to the welfare of the nation through public service activities in science, technology, and public policy. Dr. Colwell, whose work bridges many areas, including microbiology, ecology, infectious disease, public health, and computer and satellite technology, is recognized for her significant, life-saving contributions in the areas of global infectious diseases, water, and health. Among many other honors, she is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is currently co-chairing the CNSTAT Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in genetics and M.S. and B.S. degrees from Purdue University.

 

We congratulate Roderick J. Little, Richard D. Remington distinguished university professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan, and Donald Rubin, John L. Loeb professor of statistics at Harvard University, on receiving the 2017 Karl Pearson Prize for their book Statistical Analysis with Missing Data. The prize, awarded biennially, was established in 2013 by the ISI and Elsevier Publishers to recognize a research article or book published within the last three decades that has profoundly influenced statistical theory, methodology, practice or applications. The authors will present the Pearson Lecture at the International Statistical Institute (ISI) World Statistics Congress in Marrakech, in July 2017. Their citation reads (in part):

The work of Roderick J. Little and Donald B. Rubin, laid out in their seminal 1978 Biometrika papers and 1987 book, updated in 2002, has been no less than defining and transforming. Earlier missing data work was ad hoc at best. Little and Rubin defined the field and provided the methodological and applied communities with a useful and usable taxonomy and a set of key results. Today, their terminology and methodology are used more than ever. Their work has been transforming for the deep impact it had, and has, on both statistical practice and theory. It is one of the rare topics that has continued for the past thirty years to be studied and developed in academia, government and industry.

Both Rod and Don served on CNSTAT and CNSTAT panels; Rod is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and Don of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

We congratulate Elizabeth Stuart, professor of mental health, biostatistics, and health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and associate dean for education, on receiving the 2017 Gertrude M. Cox Award from the Washington Statistical Society (WSS) and RTI International. Liz has a B.S. in mathematics from Smith College and a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University, where she worked with Donald Rubin, Gary King, and Alan Zaslavsky. Her primary research interests are in statistical methodology for mental health research, particularly relating to causal inference and missing data. She has published broadly on propensity score methods, analysis of observational data, and applications, is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and served on the CNSTAT panel that produced Commercial Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs in 2016. She will give the Cox Award presentation at RTI International on the afternoon of June 28, 2017, preceding the WSS Annual Dinner. The award was established in 2003 in memory of Gertrude M. Cox (1900-1978) to recognize statisticians in early to mid-career who have already made significant contributions to statistical practice. Dr. Cox was head of experimental statistics at North Carolina State University for many years. Upon her retirement in 1960, she became the first head of the Statistical Research Division at the newly founded RTI. She was the first woman elected (in 1949) to the International Statistical Institute, served as president of the American Statistical Association, and was a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


We congratulate Katherine K. Wallman, recently retired after 24 years as U.S. chief statistician at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), on receiving the 2017 Julius Shiskin Memorial Award for Economic Statistics. The award recognizes unusually original and important contributions in the development of economic statistics or in the use of statistics in interpreting the economy. Katherine is recognized for strengthening the independence of U.S. statistical agencies; expanding confidentiality protection; improving the quality and usability of official statistics; increasing collaboration among the statistical agencies; and improving the reliability and comparability of official statistics throughout the world. The full citation is an attachment to this newsletter.

 

Katherine Wallman was also honored by CNSTAT at our public seminar, May 12, 2017, for “her 5 decades of dedicated service to the quality, relevance, objectivity, and international comparability of federal statistics, which form the bedrock of American democracy.” For those not aware of the full extent of her career, we noted her positions as follows:

  • Chief Statistician of the United States, Office of Management and Budget, 1992–2017
  • Executive Director, Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics, 1982–1992
  • Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1977–1981
  • Statistical Policy Division, Office of Management and Budget, 1976–1977
  • Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Library Programs & National Center for Education Statistics, 1967–1976


We congratulate the following members of the Washington statistical community who have been elected as 2017 American Statistical Association Fellows. They will be recognized at the Joint Statistical Meetings in Baltimore, MD, August 1, 2017.

  • Ron S. Jarmin, associate director for economic programs, U.S. Census Bureau
  • Thomas R. Krenzke, senior statistician, Westat
  • Jennifer D. Parker, senior statistician, National Center for Health Statistics
  • Katherine J. Thompson, mathematical statistician, U.S. Census Bureau

 

We note that Monroe Sirken was honored at a luncheon of the Senior Statisticians Society of the Washington DC metropolitan area, May 16, 2017. Monroe earned his B.A. and M.A. in sociology at UCLA and his Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Washington. He spent some time in the early 1950s in the Office of the Assistant Director for Research, U.S. Bureau of the Census. Monroe visited the Census Bureau at a time of great change in the use of sampling and survey methods and decided to remain. He moved to the National Office of Vital Statistics in 1953. He held a variety of research and administrative positions at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and was the associate director, research and methodology, and the director, Office of Research and Methodology, until 1996 when he became a senior research scientist, not “retiring” for many years thereafter. His major professional interests have been in survey and statistical research responsive to the needs of federal statistics. His work on the design of rare and sensitive population surveys led to the development of network sampling, which improves precision by linking multiple selection units to the same observation units. His work to foster research on the cognitive aspects of survey methods led to the establishment of permanent questionnaire design research laboratories, first at NCHS and later at other statistical agencies. Monroe was a charter member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received the Public Health Service Superior Service Award and the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics. In 2014 he endowed the Monroe G. Sirken Award in Interdisciplinary Survey Methods Research.

 

We thank Robert (“Bob”) Bell for his years of service to CNSTAT on the occasion of his retirement from Google’s research and machine intelligence unit, May 12, 2017. Bob served on CNSTAT and on its panels on correlation bias and coverage measurement in the 2010 census, the review of the 2000 census, and planning for the 2000 census, and on several committees in other parts of the National Academies. Bob is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and served on the board of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University, and held positions at RAND doing public policy analysis and with the Statistics Research Department at AT&T Labs-Research before moving to Google. His research interests range from machine learning methods to survey research methods. He was part of a team that won the Netflix Prize in 2009 by achieving a 10 percent reduction in root mean square error relative to Netflix’s algorithm for predicting customer behavior. 

 

We thank Carol Crawford for her service to the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and wish her all the best in her new position as director of the Center for Design, Methods, and Analysis with the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Carol was most recently deputy director for science & planning in the NASS Research and Development Division. Before that she held a number of positions with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has a Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University, where she received the George Snedecor Award, and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. 

We thank John Thompson for his years of government service, most recently as director of the U.S. Census Bureau, from which position he will be retiring June 30, 2017. John is an acknowledged expert in the field of social science research, with a special emphasis on large and complex surveys. Previously, he served as president and executive vice president for survey operations at NORC at the University of Chicago. He started at NORC in 2002 after a 27-year career at the U.S. Census Bureau, serving as one of the Bureau’s most senior career officers, with responsibility for many aspects of the 2000 census, including management, operations, and methodology. He served on CNSTAT from 2011-2013 and on its Panel to Review the 2010 Census, Committee on Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Fifth Edition, and Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and past chair of the association's Social Statistics Section and Committee on Fellows. He will be very much missed.


 

 Publication News Header 


Evaluation of Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016, is the final report of the Committee on the Evaluation of NAEP Mathematics and Reading Levels, chaired by Christopher Edley, Jr. (UC Berkeley), and sponsored by the Department of Education. The report, edited by Christopher Edley, Jr., and Judith Koenig, is available as a free PDF and in print.

Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has been providing policymakers, educators, and the public with reports on academic performance and progress of the nation’s students. The assessment is given periodically in a variety of subjects: mathematics, reading, writing, science, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and technology and engineering literacy. NAEP is given to representative samples of students across the United States to assess the educational progress of the nation as a whole. Since 1992, NAEP results have been reported in relation to three achievement levels: basic, proficient, and advanced. However, the use of achievement levels has provoked controversy and disagreement, and evaluators have identified numerous concerns. This publication evaluates the NAEP student achievement levels in reading and mathematics in grades 4, 8, and 12 to determine whether the achievement levels are reasonable, reliable, valid, and informative to the public, and recommends ways that the setting and use of achievement levels can be improved.

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, released in prepublication format, September 21, 2016, is the final report of the Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, chaired by Francine Blau (Cornell University) and sponsored by the John T. and Catherine D. MacArthur Foundation and the Independent Funds of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report, edited by Francine Blau and Christopher Mackie, is available as a free PDF and in print. The report has been covered in at least 148 media articles, and has been downloaded almost 11,000 times by people in at least 30 countries.

More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, the first generation (foreign-born) and second generation (children of the foreign-born) comprise almost one in four Americans. It comes as little surprise, then, that many U.S. residents view immigration as a major policy issue facing the nation. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts with nearly every policy area of concern, from jobs and the economy, education, and health care, to federal, state, and local government budgets. The changing patterns of immigration and the evolving consequences for American society, institutions, and the economy continue to fuel public policy debate that plays out at the national, state, and local levels. The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration assesses the impact of dynamic immigration processes on economic and fiscal outcomes for the United States.

 
Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT public seminars and symposia page. Presentations from the October 2016 CNSTAT meeting public seminar, "Taking Surveys to People's Technology: Implications for Federal Statistics and Social Science Research," are available here.

Slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. This page also includes a section on “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.

  

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 

 
CNSTAT’s 134th meeting will be held October 19-20, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 20th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

CNSTAT’s 135th meeting will be held February 9-10, 2018, at the National Academies Beckman Center in Irvine, CA. It will be in retreat format; it will not have a public seminar or agency head luncheon.

CNSTAT’s 136th meeting will be held May 10-11, 2018, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 11th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.
               

 

 AP Header


[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Panel on Methods for Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Improve Crop Estimates
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2014–September 2017
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Mary Ellen Bock (Purdue University)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and final in-person (closed) scheduled for May 30-31, 2017, in Irvine, CA

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Third meeting scheduled for May 24-25, 2017 at UC Davis (CA)

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty [on hold]
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Publication: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Sixth and final meeting (closed) scheduled for June 8-9, 2017

Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2013–November 2016
Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin; research assistant: Adrienne Bradford
Chair: John Czajka (Mathematica Policy Research)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and last meeting held October 10-11, 2016, in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: Ninth meeting scheduled for August 24-25, 2017, in Washington DC

 

Department of Education
 

 Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity (see listing under "The Atlantic Philanthropies et al." below)


 

Department of Health and Human Services

 
Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years
(joint with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, which has the lead)
Sponsors: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Foundation for Child Development
Duration: October 2016–April 2019
Study director: Suzanne Le Menestrel (BCYF); senior program officer: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Rebekah Hutton (BCYF); project assistant: Pamella Atayi (BCYF)
Chair: Greg Duncan (UC Irvine)
Publication: Final report
Meetings: Second meeting scheduled for June 20-22, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Improving Health Research on Small Subpopulations
(joint with the Health and Medicine Division)
Sponsor: National Cancer Institute
Duration: March 2017–July 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Workshop on a Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation
Sponsors: Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services); U.S. Department of Labor; Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education); and U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: Grover (Russ) Whitehurst, Brookings Institution
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief was released March 20, 2017 (see "Publication News" above); full proceedings being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held October 27, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Research Agenda for Longitudinal Studies
Sponsor: National Institute on Aging, Division of Behavioral and Social Research
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: James Jackson (University of Michigan and Russell Sage Foundation)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief
Upcoming meetings: Workshop scheduled for June 5-6, 2017 in Washington, DC
                            
 

Department of Justice
 

Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Publications planned: First report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, was released in prepublication format, May 16, 2016; printed copies and free PDFs are available; second report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Final in-person meeting (closed) held January 13-14 2017, in Coral Gables, FL

 
 

Department of Transportation


Panel to Review the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (joint with the Transportation Research Board)
Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
Duration: March 2016–September 2017
Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Richard Pain; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Stephen Godwin; project assistant: Michael Siri; summer intern: Andrew Yarger; off-site research associate: Jacob Spertus (Harvard)
Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting held February 16-17, 2017: fifth meeting TBD
 
 

National Science Foundation

 
Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Sixth meeting scheduled for July 6-7, 2017, in Washington, DC


Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: Planning meeting held October 4, 2016 in Washington, DC; workshop scheduled for June 21-22, 2017


The Atlantic Philanthropies, the Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the U.S.
Department of Education, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the W.T. Grant Foundation

Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity
Sponsors: See above list
Duration: December 2016–December 2018
Study director: Judith Koenig; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistants: Kelly Arrington (beginning April 2017) and Agnes Gaskin (January–April 2017)
Co-chairs: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley); Lorraine McDonnell (UC Santa Barbara)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: First meeting held April 20-21, 2017, in Washington, DC; second meeting TBD


The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Standing Committee on Creating the American Opportunity Study, First Phase

Sponsor: The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Duration: April 2015–March 2017

Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin

Chair: Michael Hout (NYU)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee facilitated a workshop, May 9, 2016, on research uses of the American Opportunity Study (AOS), which is being developed to measure intergenerational mobility by linking 1990 census records (after capturing the necessary information) with subsequent census records, American Community Survey records, and administrative records that become available. The result will be a facility for researchers to obtain extracts of linked files for analysis within the Federal Statistical Research Data Center network (formerly the Census Bureau RDC network). The First-Phase AOS is to address the challenges of capturing linking information for the 1990 census short-form and long-form records, to evaluate the likely quality of matches with other records, and to propose the next phase of work.  A “workshop in brief” proceedings of the May workshop was released July 19, 2016, and is available for download as a free PDF. Presentation slides from the May workshop are also available.

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting TBD  

 
 

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
 

Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration
Sponsor: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Duration: May 2013–October 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Francine Blau (Cornell University)
Publication: Final report, The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, was released as in prepublication format, September 21, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held September 11-12, 2015, in Washington, DC
 
 

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

  

Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods
Sponsor: The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Duration: April 2015–December 2017
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; research assistant: George Schoeffel; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Robert Groves (Georgetown University)
Publication planned: Two reports; first report, Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Information While Protecting Privacy, was released in prepublication format, January 12, 2017 (see “Publication News” above); second report is being drafted; a website is maintained for the panel.  
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held for March 16-17, 2017, in Washington, DC
 

 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News April 2017
CNSTAT News March 2017

CNSTAT News 2016
CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 


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