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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

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 — April 3, 2018 — 

 

 People News 

 

We thank John Gawalt, who retires as director of the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), on April 3, 2018, after 30 years of federal service. Prior to becoming director, John served as deputy director for NCSES, and, prior to that, as program director for its Information and Technology Services Program, where he was responsible for design, development, and operation of the NCSES website, traditional and electronic publishing, online data access, database management, and general information technology support. His formal training is in natural resources and resource economics (bachelor’s degree and 2 years of graduate study at the University of Rhode Island), with a focus on the econometric study of the fishing industry. He began his federal career as a summer student at the Economic Research Service in USDA and moved to the Consumer and Producer Price Programs at the Bureau of Labor Statistics before coming to NCSES. From an interview published in AmstatNews, May 1, 2014, he asserted that “federal service . . . [is] an honorable profession—I have known and worked with many dedicated, caring, and talented people.” We in turn thank John for his commitment and dedication to federal statistics and wish him the best in retirement.

 

We welcome back Mark Schneider to the U.S. Department of Education.  Mark served as commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) from 2005–2008 and has just been confirmed by the U.S. Senate for a 6-year term as director of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES).  IES comprises NCES, the National Center for Education Research, the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, and the National Center for Special Education Research. Mark is currently a vice president and institute fellow at the American Institutes for Research and president of College Measures. He is also a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and distinguished professor emeritus of political science at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. He has been working on increasing schools’ accountability by making data on college productivity and the labor market success of college graduates more publicly available.

 

We congratulate Francine Blau, Frances Perkins professor of industrial and labor relations and professor of economics, Cornell University, and member of CNSTAT, who recently had a room named for her at the German Institute for Economic Research (Deutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung). DIW Berlin, as it is commonly known, is one of the leading economic research institutes in Germany, founded in 1925. The plaque outside the Francine D. Blau Room reads:

 

Francine D. Blau

American Economist

Blau, a DIW Berlin research fellow, brings gender differences in the labor market to the attention of the public with her impressive body of research as well as through her professional activities in numerous institutions. Apart from her groundbreaking work on gender issues, wage inequality, and international comparisons of labor market outcomes, Blau has also published influential studies on various other topics in labor economics, such as migration and racial discrimination, profoundly shaping the view of scholars and policymakers.

  

 

 Publication News Header 

Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime, the second and final report of a consensus panel under CNSTAT, chaired by Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis) and sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), was released in prepublication format, March 21, 2018.  Free PDFs are available here; printed copies will be available shortly.

      To derive statistics about crime—to estimate its levels and trends, assess its costs to and impacts on society, and inform law enforcement approaches to prevent it—a conceptual framework for defining and thinking about crime is virtually a prerequisite. Maintaining such a framework is no easy task, because the mechanics of crime are ever evolving and shifting. In important respects, current U.S. crime statistics are collected using precepts formed at the outset of data collection in the 1920s or made overly rigid over ensuing decades. Today, forms of crime that are not well measured by any crime data collection, such as cybercrime and environmental violations, call for a reassessment of the concepts, methods, and governance structure for a comprehensive set of crime statistics. The panel’s first report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, assessed user and stakeholder needs for crime information and proposed a classification of crime to organize measurement efforts. This second report builds on that effort, suggesting methodological and implementation techniques for using the new crime classification as a conceptual blueprint for modernizing national crime statistics and arguing for the need for comprehensive coordination and governance structures in U.S. crime statistics.    

Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs
, the final report of a consensus panel under CNSTAT, co-chaired by Rita Colwell (University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan) and sponsored by the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), was released in prepublication format, January 9, 2018. Free PDFs are available
here; printed copies will be available shortly.

NCSES, housed in the National Science Foundation, is one of the nation’s principal statistical agencies, is charged to collect, acquire, analyze, report, and disseminate statistical data related to the science and engineering enterprise in the United States and other nations that is relevant and useful to practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and the public. NCSES data, based primarily on several flagship surveys, have become the major evidence base for American science and technology policy, and the agency is well respected globally for these data. This report assesses and provides guidance on NCSES’s approach to measuring the science and engineering workforce population in the United States. It also proposes a framework for measuring the science and engineering workforce in the next decade and beyond, with flexibility to examine emerging issues related to this unique population while at the same time allowing for stability in the estimation of key trends.

 

A Smarter National Surveillance System for Occupational Safety and Health in the 21st Century, the final report of a consensus panel under the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Committee on National Statistics, and Board on Health Sciences Policy, chaired by Edward Shortliffe (Arizona State University), was released in prepublication format, January 9, 2018. The report was sponsored by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Free PDFs are available here, and printed copies will be available shortly.

The workplace is where 156 million adults in the United States spend many waking hours, and it has a profound influence on health and well-being. Although some occupations and work-related activities are more hazardous than others and face higher rates of injuries, illness, disease, and fatalities, workers in all occupations face some form of work-related safety and health concerns. Occupational safety and health (OSH) surveillance provides the data and analyses needed to understand the relationships between work and injuries and illnesses in order to improve worker safety and health and prevent work-related injuries and illnesses. Information about the circumstances in which workers are injured or made ill on the job and how these patterns change over time is essential to develop effective prevention programs and target future research. This report provides a comprehensive assessment of the state of OSH surveillance. It is intended to be useful to federal and state agencies that have an interest in occupational safety and health, but may also be of interest broadly to employers, labor unions and other worker advocacy organizations, the workers’ compensation insurance industry, as well as state epidemiologists, academic researchers, and the broader public health community. The recommendations address both short- and long-term actions and strategies needed to bring about a progressive evolution of the current system.


RECENTLY RELEASED REPORTS NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINTED FORM


The 2014 Redesign of the Survey of Income and Program Participation: An Assessment, released August 28, 2017

 

Federal Statistics, Multiple Data Sources, and Privacy Protection: Next Steps, released October 2, 2017

 

Improving Crop Estimates by Integrating Multiple Data Sources, released October 11, 2017


Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT public seminars and symposiaPresentations from the October 2017 CNSTAT meeting public seminar, “New Directions for Federal Statistics,” are available here.


Slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. This page also includes a section on “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.

  

Event Other News


On March 26, 2018, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating that a question on citizenship would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. The questionnaire must still go through the regular OMB Paperwork Reduction Act process. We provide here, for the interest of readers, a factual statement regarding the history of the citizenship question in the U.S. census.  The question was asked in many 19th and early 20th century censuses at a time when there was only one form and enumeration was conducted in-person.  The 1950 census is the last census since World War II to ask citizenship of everyone (that census, also conducted by personal enumeration, asked a number of questions, but not citizenship, on a sample basis). The 1960 census did not include the question at all, except in New York State, which paid to have the question included on the short form for every NYS resident. From 1970 through 2000, citizenship was a question on the long-form sample, and it has been a question on the American Community Survey since the initiation of the ACS in 2005.  The Justice Department’s request for block-level data on citizenship, which prompted Secretary Ross’s memorandum, is the first such request in the history of administration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.


A consortium of sponsors requests nominations for the Jeanne E. Griffith Mentoring Award, which recognizes and encourages the mentoring of junior staff in the statistical community in federal, state, or local government. The award is made annually to a supervisor, technical director, team coordinator, or other statistical staff member who is nominated by a supervisor and co-workers for his or her efforts in supporting the work and developing the careers of junior staff. Nominations are due April 16, 2018. Click here for more information. 


Government Statistics Section (GSS) of the American Statistical Association (ASA) sponsors an annual Pat Doyle Award to recognize a person whose contribution to GSS leaves a lasting impact on GSS and ASA. This award was established in 2005 as a tribute to Pat's dedication to the statistical field and the GSS during her lifetime. When Pat died, she left her imprints on an astonishingly wide range of projects and activities in the U.S. federal statistical community, and the GSS continues to honor her legacy with this annual award. Nominations for the award are due by COB April 18, 2018.  Please send nominations to Marilyn Seastrom (
Marilyn.seastrom@ed.gov). Previous recipients of the Pat Doyle Aware are: (2005) Clyde Tucker, (2006) Robert Lussier, (2007) Wendy Alvey, (2008) John Czajka, (2009) Stephanie Shipp, (2010) Bill Wong, (2011) Natalya Verbitsky-Savitz, (2012) Carol House, (2013) Nancy Bates, (2014) Brian Harris-Kojetin, (2015) Stephen Cohen, (2016) Jill (Montaquila) DeMatteis, and (2017) Jennifer Parker. Having known Pat personally and professionally throughout her career with Mathematica Policy Research, the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research, and the U.S. Census Bureau, your newsletter editor can attest to the depth of her devotion to improving federal statistics and the metadata for same and her active involvement in ASA, GSS, the Association of Public Data Users (APDU), and the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST). I know she would be pleased that GSS established an award in her honor.


The American Statistical Association (ASA) invites nominations for the first Links Lecture Award, announced on January 17, 2018. The award is intended to contribute to advancement of work in official statistics through the statistical use of administrative records and alternative data sources, record linkage, statistical methods for creating blended estimates, and issues associated with these activities such as privacy, confidentiality, researcher access, and reproducibility of results. Nominations are due May 1, 2018—click here for information. 

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 

 
CNSTAT’s 136th meeting will be held May 10-11, 2018, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 11th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, ICSP), followed by a “Big Data Day” featuring posters and demos, beginning with a plenary panel at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 5:00 pm. Stayed tuned for more information. We hope to see you there.

CNSTAT’s 137th meeting will be held October 18-19, 2018, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 19th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm. 

CNSTAT’s 138th meeting will be held February 7-8, 2019, at the National Academies’ Beckman Center in Irvine, CA. It will be in retreat format; it will not have a public seminar or agency head lunch.

               

 

 AP Header


[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Improving Consumer Data for Food and Nutrition Policy Research for the Economic Research Service, USDA

Sponsor: Economic Research Service

Duration: October 2017–December 2019

Study director: Christopher Mackie; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Anthony Mann

Chair-designate: Marianne Bitler (UC-Davis)

Publication planned: Final report

Upcoming meetings: First meeting scheduled for April 16-17, 2018, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC. April 16th is a public meeting, which will be webcast. Register and see the agenda here.
Charge to the study panel: The expert panel will critically assess the value of each of the various ERS investments in food and nutrition data, including proprietary data, various linked and integrated data sources, and the widely used Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) to provide directions for the next 10 years of the CDNR Program. A wide range of data collection strategies, including use of supplements to existing federal surveys, exploitation of administrative and commercial data, and improvements in database linkages will be considered. A second public meeting will take place in mid-June.

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Sixth and final meeting (closed) held March 26-27, 2018, at NORC in Chicago, IL

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty 
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Publication: Final report is in response to review
Meetings: Sixth and final meeting held June 8-9, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Conceptualizing the 2030 Census
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: October 2017–September 2018
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Joseph Salvo (NYC Department of City Planning)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meeting: Workshop TBD

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations 
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Workshop on the Census Bureau’s 2018 End-to-End Test and Concept of Operations for Reengineering the 2020 Census [postponed]

Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau

Duration: October 2017 – September 2018

Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Daniel Cork; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann

Chair-designate: Joseph Salvo (NYC Department of City Planning)

Publication planned: Workshop proceedings

Upcoming meetings: TBD

 

Department of Education
 

Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity (see listing under "The Atlantic Philanthropies et al." below)

 

 Department of Health and Human Services

 
Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years
(joint with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, which has the lead)
Sponsors: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Foundation for Child Development
Duration: October 2016–April 2019
Study director: Suzanne Le Menestrel (BCYF); senior program officer: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Rebekah Hutton (BCYF); project assistant: Pamella Atayi (BCYF)
Chair: Greg Duncan (UC Irvine)
Publication: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Seventh in-person meeting scheduled for May 14-15, 2018, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Improving Health Research on Small Subpopulations
(joint with the Health and Medicine Division)
Sponsor: National Cancer Institute
Duration: March 2017–July 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Graham Colditz (Washington University, St. Louis Medical School)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held January 18-19, 2018, in Washington, DC, information on the workshop is available here.
                   
 

   Department of Justice


Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Publications planned: First report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, was released in prepublication format, May 16, 2016; printed copies and free PDFs are available; second report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime, released in prepublication format, March 21, 2018. Free PDFs are available here; printed copies will be available shortly.
Meetings: Final in-person meeting (closed) held January 13-14, 2017, in Coral Gables, FL 
 

Department of Transportation


Standing Committee for Improving Motor Carrier Safety Measurement (joint with the Transportation Research Board)

Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

Duration: October 2017–September 2020

Study director: Michael Cohen; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Tom Menzies; project assistant: Michael Siri

Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon Lise-Normand (Harvard Medical School)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels.

Upcoming meetings: The standing committee is initially meeting by teleconference, the first of which is scheduled for April 13, 2018

 

 National Science Foundation


Committee on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science
(led by the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, with the Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics, CNSTAT, and the Division of Earth and Life Sciences)

Sponsor: NSF director’s office (congressionally mandated)

Duration: August 2017 – March 2019

Study director:  Jennifer Heimberg (DELS); board director: Michelle Schwalbe (BMSA); senior program officer: Adrienne Stith Butler (BBCSS); senior program officer: Michael Cohen (CNSTAT)

Chair: Harvey Fineberg (Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation)

Publication planned: Final report

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting scheduled for April 18-19, 2018, in Washington, DC

Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Publication planned:  Final report, Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs, released in prepublication format, January 9, 2018. Free PDFs are available here; printed copies will be available shortly.
Meetings: Sixth and final meeting held July 6-7, 2017, in Washington, DC


Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings is being drafted
Meetings: Workshop held June 21-22, 2017

The American Educational Research Association, the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the W.T. Grant Foundation

Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity
Sponsors: See above list
Duration: December 2016–December 2018
Study director: Judith Koenig; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistants: Kelly Arrington (beginning April 2017) and Agnes Gaskin (January–April 2017)
Co-chairs: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley); Lorraine McDonnell (UC Santa Barbara)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fourth in-person meeting (closed) scheduled for May 21-22, 2018, in Washington, DC
 

 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News February 2018
CNSTAT News January 2018

CNSTAT News 2017
CNSTAT News 2016
CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 



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