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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
CNSTAT - TOPICS

 

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 — June 28, 2016 — 

 

 People News

 

We note with sadness the death of Lawrence (Larry) Cox, June 1, 2016. Larry most recently was assistant director of official statistics at the National Institute of Statistical Sciences (NISS). Prior to joining NISS, he was associate director for research and methodology at the National Center for Health Statistics. His other former positions included senior mathematical statistician for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, senior mathematical statistician for the U.S. Census Bureau, and director, Board on Mathematical Sciences, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He taught for several universities and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology. He received a Ph.D. in mathematics from Brown University. He was a fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI), who served on both the ASA Board of Directors and the ISI Council. He received several awards, including a Department of Commerce Medal for Superior Federal Service. His primary research contributions were on mathematical and computational theory, methods, and optimization algorithms applied to problems in statistical science and surveys. He also developed many statistical data protection methods in current use. 

 

We congratulate John Haaga on his recent appointment as director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Research, National Institute on Aging (BSR/NIA). John joined NIA in October 2004 as deputy director of BSR/NIA, where he helped lead its extramural program funding research in economics, demography, epidemiology, cognitive science and social neurosciences, behavioral genetics, and health services related to aging. This program includes major data collection and dissemination in the United States and cross-national comparative research on global health and aging. Before joining NIA, John was director of domestic programs at the Population Reference Bureau and director of its NIH-funded Center for Public Information on Population Research and its USAID-funded projects. His previous positions included staff director for the Committee on Population of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine; director of extension research in family planning and maternal and child health at the International Centre for Disease Research, Bangladesh; policy analyst for RAND; and research associate for the Cornell University International Nutrition program. John has served as president of the Association of Population Centers and secretary-treasurer and elected member of the Board of Directors of the Population Association of America.  He has lived and worked in Bangladesh, Malaysia and Kenya, and worked for shorter periods in Indonesia, India, and several African countries. He received a B.A. in modern history from Oxford University, an M.A. in international relations from Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in public policy from the RAND Graduate School.

 

We congratulate Hubert Hamer, Jr., on his appointment as administrator of the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), effective June 12, 2016, succeeding Joe Reilly, who retired earlier in the month. Hubert previously served as director of NASS’s Statistics Division, in which capacity he led NASS’s efforts to produce and release more than 450 national statistical reports each year; as chair of the Agriculture Statistics Board; and as associate deputy administrator for field operations, overseeing the agency’s 24 eastern field offices as well as the Training and Career Development Office. Hubert also served NASS in the Louisiana, Illinois, and Missouri field offices. As part of executive training, he completed the program for senior managers in government at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and served as a fellow with the Senate Budget Committee and on the staff of the Secretary of Agriculture. He was born on a small livestock and row crop farm in Benton County, Mississippi. He is a graduate of Tennessee State University.

 

We congratulate Rebecca Maynard, University Trustee professor of education and social policy, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania, on her appointment to the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She served on the CNSTAT panel that produced the 2001 report, Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition, and the 2002 report, Studies of Welfare Populations: Data Collection and Research Issues.

 

We congratulate the following individuals who have been named distinguished fellows of the American Economic Association (AEA) and who have been active in Academies’ studies (noting a highlight or two thereof):

 

  • Richard Freeman, Department of Economics, Harvard University. He served on the CNSTAT panel (with the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy) that produced the 2013 report, Capturing Change in Science, Innovation, and Technology: Improving Indicators to Inform Policy, and is currently serving on the CNSTAT Panel to Evaluate the NCSES approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce;
  • Glenn Loury, Department of Economics, Brown University. He served on the CNSTAT panel that produced the 2004 report, Measuring Racial Discrimination; and
  • Isabel Sawhill, Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution. She served on the Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy.

 

We thank Kathleen (Kathy) Short for her more than 30 years of service to federal statistics at the U.S. Census Bureau and wish her all the best as she begins her retirement, which took effect May 31, 2016. Following receipt of her Ph.D.in economics from the University of Michigan, she joined the Census Bureau in 1984 as a member of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) research staff in the Population Division. She went on to work in the Center for International Research before joining the Income Statistics Branch in what is now the Social, Economic, and Housing Statistics Division. She served as chief of the Poverty and Health Statistics Branch from 1991–1999 and most recently was the lead analyst for improving statistical measures of poverty, continuing her work on experimental poverty measures that began at the time of the release of the 1995 CNSTAT report, Measuring Poverty: A New Approach. Together with Thesia Garner, senior research economist with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Kathy led the effort to kick the tires on the report’s recommendations for developing thresholds for a new measure and redefining resources to which the thresholds would be compared to determine poverty status: a series of experimental poverty measures that varied one or more elements of the recommended new measure resulted from their work. Kathy and Thesia served on the Interagency Technical Working Group on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM), which led to the publication of the first SPM—based on the CNSTAT report’s recommendations—in 2011.

 

It is at this time of year that we thank outgoing members of CNSTAT for their service, welcome new members, and acknowledge continuing members. CNSTAT members, who serve pro bono to oversee CNSTAT’s portfolio, develop new project ideas, and stimulate conversations on improved statistical methods and information across the statistical and research communities, are appointed by the president of the National Academy of Sciences. They serve for 3-year terms, beginning July 1, with the opportunity for reappointment for a second term.

 

  • Outgoing members:  We thank profusely for their 6 years of service Michael (Mike) Hout, Department of Sociology, New York University, and John Abowd, on leave from the Cornell School of Industrial and Labor Relations while serving as associate director for research and methodology at the U.S. Census Bureau. Among his many activities for CNSTAT, Mike served on the panel that produced the 2012 report, Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education, for the Lumina Foundation and is currently chairing the Standing Committee on the American Opportunity Study–Phase 1. John chaired the panel that produced the 2013 report, Collecting Compensation Data from Employers, for the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission. 

  • We welcome as incoming members Janet Currie, Department of Economics, Princeton University, and Lars Peter Hansen, Department of Economics, University of Chicago. Brief bios for Janet and Lars follow:

 

Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Well Being. Her research focuses on the impact of government policies and poverty on the health and well-being of children over their life cycle. She has written about early intervention programs and expansions of the Medicaid program, public housing, and food and nutrition programs. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in child health and environmental threats to children's health. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine in the Social Sciences, Humanities and Law Section, a position she was elected to in 2013. She served on the Board on Children, Youth and Families and the Committee on Population, and has served on several Academies committees on the promotion of well-being of children and families. She is currently on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science magazine and the editorial board of the Quarterly Journal of Economics. She has been elected to membership positions in numerous professional associations, including member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; member of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences; and fellow of the Econometric Society. She served as both president and vice president of the Society of Labor Economists and served as vice president of the American Economic Association.  She has a B.A. and M.A. in economics from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

 

o  Lars P. Hansen is the David Rockefeller distinguished service professor in economics and professor of statistics at the University of Chicago. He also serves as research director of the Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at the University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include time series econometrics, quantitative analysis of dynamic equilibrium models, and asset pricing. He developed original econometric methods that now constitute the framework for modern empirical research on intertemporal economics, including consumption and asset pricing. In 1999, he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in the Economic Sciences Section. He has received many awards throughout his career, including the 2013 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for his early research, an honor he shares with Eugene Fama and Robert Shiller; the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Economics, Finance and Management; the CME Group-MSRI Prize in Innovative Quantitative Applications; and a Nemmers Prizes in economics and mathematics. He has been elected to membership positions in various professional organizations, including fellow of the Econometric Society and member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served as president of the Econometric Society.  He has a B.S. in mathematics and political science from Utah State University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

We acknowledge with gratitude the continuing service of the following CNSTAT members:

 

o   Lawrence Brown (chair), Department of Statistics, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

o   Francine Blau, Department of Economics, Cornell University

o   Mary Ellen Bock, Department of Statistics, Purdue University (emerita)

o   Michael Chernew, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

o   Don Dillman, Center for Survey Research, Washington State University

o   Constantine Gatsonis, Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University

o   James House, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan (emeritus)

o   Thomas Mesenbourg, Deputy Director (retired), U.S. Census Bureau

o   Susan Murphy, Department of Statistics, University of Michigan

o   Sarah Nusser, Vice President for Research and Department of Statistics, Iowa State University

o   Colm O’Muircheartaigh, Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago

o   Ruth Peterson, Criminal Justice Research Center (emerita), Ohio State University

o   Roberto Rigobon, Sloan School of Management, MIT 

o   Edward Shortliffe, Departments of Biomedical Informatics, Arizona State University and Columbia University

 

 

 Report News

 

Measuring Trauma: Workshop Summary was released in prepublication format, June 3, 2016 (free PDFs are available; printed copies will be available shortly). The summary reports on a workshop on Integrating New Measures of Trauma into the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Data Collection Programs, held in Washington, DC, in December 2015. The workshop was organized as part of an effort to assist SAMHSA and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in their responsibilities to expand the collection of behavioral health data to include measures of trauma. The main goals of the workshop were to discuss options for collecting data and producing estimates on exposure to traumatic events and PTSD, including available measures and associated possible data collection mechanisms.

Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime
, the first report of a CNSTAT panel with input from the Committee on Law and Justice, was released in prepublication format on May 16, 2016 (free
PDFs are available; printed copies will be available shortly). The panel is chaired by Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St Louis) and is sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) and the FBI. The rationale for the first report is that to derive statistics about crime—to estimate its levels and trends, assess its costs to and impacts on society, and inform law enforcement approaches to prevent it—a conceptual framework for defining and thinking about crime is a prerequisite. Developing and maintaining such a framework is no easy task, because the mechanics of crime are ever evolving and shifting, tied to shifts and development in technology, society, and legislation. After some decades of preliminary work (notably, prisoners’ offenses being tallied in the 1850–1890 decennial censuses), the collection of nationwide crime statistics began in earnest in the 1920s. A committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police issued a manual on the collection of “uniform” crime records in 1929, focusing attention on the crimes that were deemed to be most consistently defined across state laws as well as most publicly visible. That 1929 manual was subsequently used by the FBI in establishing its Uniform Crime Reporting program, based on voluntary submissions from local law enforcement. It also marks the last time that the whole enterprise of U.S. crime statistics collection was assessed and its conceptual backdrop reviewed; many of the same concepts and definitions outlined in 1929 carried over to BJS’s National Crime Victimization Survey in the 1970s and to other collections, and remain in place today. The key distinction between the rigorous classification proposed in this report and the “classifications” that have come before in U.S. crime statistics is that it is not a simple exercise in labeling. It is a conceptual framework intended for statistical purposes, partitioning the entirety of behaviors that could be considered criminal offenses into mutually exclusive categories. Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1 considers a wide variety of data user and stakeholder perspectives, and examples of historical and international classification systems, in suggesting a taxonomy and an accompanying set of attributes to be collected on crime incidents. Report 2, to be completed next year, will address priorities for implementation and operational considerations.

Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs
, the final report of a CNSTAT panel with input from the Board on Human-Systems Integration and the Transportation Research Board, was released in prepublication format, March 10, 2016 (free PDFs are available here; printed copies will be available shortly). The panel was co-chaired by Matthew Rizzo (University of Nebraska Medical Center) and Hal Stern (University of California, Irvine) for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The motivation for the report is the approximately 4,000 fatalities in crashes involving trucks and buses in the United States each year. Though estimates are wide-ranging, possibly 10 to 20 percent of these crashes might have involved fatigued drivers. The stresses associated with their particular jobs (irregular schedules, etc.) and the lifestyle that many truck and bus drivers lead, put them at substantial risk for insufficient sleep and for developing short- and long-term health problems. The report assesses the state of knowledge about the relationship of such factors as hours of driving, hours on duty, and periods of rest to the fatigue experienced by truck and bus drivers while driving and the implications for the safe operation of their vehicles. The report evaluates the relationship of these factors to drivers’ health over the longer term, and identifies improvements in data and research methods that can lead to better understanding in both areas.

Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT
public seminars and symposia page; slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. The most recent addition to the presentations section is “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from recent workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.
  

 
Event Other News

We provide the following notice from the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) to those readers who followed the rise and demise of the National Children’s Study (see the 2014 CNSTAT report, The National Children’s Study 2014: An Assessment):

A New NAM Perspective Series


We know that the well-being of adults has roots in early life. In order to increase our understanding of these processes, we need to study how our nation’s children learn and develop across the life course from before they are born until adulthood. Many leading U.S. scientists believe that a nationally representative birth cohort study that begins in pregnancy has unique value for major advancements in our understanding of how children in this nation grow into healthy, successful, and happy adults.


In a two-part Perspectives series, Lifelong Impact: Why the United States Needs a National Birth Cohort Study, authors discuss the reasons why a national birth cohort study is important for the future of health in the United States and how such a study could be designed in a way that is multidisciplinary, focuses on the main drivers of health, engages communities, employs a diverse set of data sources, and includes innovative techniques in data analysis.

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 


CNSTAT’s 131st meeting will be held October 20-21, 2016, in the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 21st, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads, followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 2 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

CNSTAT’s 132nd meeting will be held February 10-11, 2017, at the Beckman Center on the University of California, Irvine, campus. It will be in retreat format.

CNSTAT’s 133rd meeting will be held May 11-12, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 12th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 2 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

 

NOTE: Presentations from the May 6, 2016, CNSTAT public seminar on “Combining Information from Survey and Non-Survey Data Sources for Policy Research: Challenges and Opportunities” are available on the CNSTAT website. Presentations from the October 23, 2015, CNSTAT public seminar on “Reengineering the 2020 Census” are available on the CNSTAT web site under News and Events/Public Seminars and Other Symposia. Presentations from the joint CNSTAT/NSF-Census Research Network (NCRN) set of workshops and public seminar at the May 8, 2015, CNSTAT meeting are available on the NCRN site.
 

 

 AP Header


[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Panel on Methods for Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Improve Crop Estimates
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2014–September 2017
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Mary Ellen Bock (Purdue University)
Report planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Third meeting scheduled for October 6-7, 2016, in Washington, DC.

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Report planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Report planned: Workshop summary
Upcoming meetings: TBD


Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair-designate: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Report planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting scheduled for October 27-28, 2016, in Washington, DC

Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2013–November 2016
Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin; research assistant: Adrienne Bradford
Chair: John Czajka (Mathematica Policy Research)
Report planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fifth meeting scheduled for October 10-11, 2016, in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Reports: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: Seventh meeting scheduled for September 7-9, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on the Census Bureau's Concept of Operations for Reengineering the 2020 Census
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: TBD
Report planned: Workshop summary
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Workshop on Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2015–November 2016
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Co-chairs: Linda Gage (California Department of Finance, retired) and Joseph Salvo (NYC Department of City Planning)
Report planned: Workshop summary
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held March 8-9, 2016, in Washington, DC


Department of Education
  

Committee on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Achievement Levels Evaluation (joint with the Board on Testing and Assessment, which has the lead)
Sponsor: National Center for Education Statistics
Duration: September 2014–July 2016
Study director: Judith Koenig (BOTA); program officer: Jordyn White (CNSTAT); project assistant: Kelly Arrington (BOTA)
Chair: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley)
Report planned: Final report, Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, has cleared review and is being prepared for release
Upcoming meetings: Eighth (last) meeting (closed) held November 16-17, 2015, in Irvine, CA


Department of Health and Human Services

Standing Committee on Integrating New Behavioral Health Measures into SAMHSA’s Data Collection Programs (joint with the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences and the Board on Health Sciences Policy)
Sponsors: Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Duration: August 2014–July 2016
Study director: Krisztina Marton; senior program officer: Jeanne Rivard (BBCSS); senior program officer: Adrienne Stith Butler (BHSP); project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: James Jackson (University of Michigan)
Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee is facilitating workshops on the topics of measuring serious emotional disturbance in children (workshop summary released in prepublication format on November 23, 2015, printed copies along with free PDFs are now available); specific mental illness diagnoses with any functional impairment (workshop summary released in prepublication format, February 12, 2016, printed copies along with free PDFs are now available); trauma (workshop summary released in prepublication format, June 3, 2016 - see "Report News" above)); and recovery (workshop summary is in review). A website is maintained for the committee. 

Upcoming meetings: Final meeting held May 26-27, 2016, in Washington, DC
 
Workshop on Improving Data on Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Collections
Sponsor: Office of Minority Health
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Wendy Manning (Bowling Green University)
Report planned: Workshop summary is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held March 29-30, 2016, in Washington, DC

                

Department of Justice
 

Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Seth Hauser; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Reports planned: First report was released May 16, 2016 (see "Report News" above); second report is being planned

Upcoming meetings: 12th meeting scheduled for June 29-30, 2016, in Washington, DC; 13th meeting scheduled for September 14-15, 2016, in Washington, DC
 


Department of Transportation

Panel to Review the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (joint with the Transportation Research Board)
Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
Duration: March 2016–September 2017
Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Richard Pain; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Stephen Godwin; project assistant: Michael Siri; summer intern: Andrew Yarger
Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School)
Report planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: First meeting scheduled for June 29-30, 2016, in Washington, DC

 
National Science Foundation
 
Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Report planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Second meeting scheduled for August 4-5, 2016 in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on the Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys

Sponsor: National Science Foundation

Duration: March 2015–June 2017

Study director: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Eileen LeFurgy

Chair: Barbara Entwisle (University of North Carolina)

Reports: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they may also stand up workshops or consensus panels. A website is maintained for the committee.

Upcoming meetings: Third in-person meeting scheduled for October 6-7, 2016 in Washington, DC (by invitation)

Workshop on Prioritizing and Implementing Improvements to Innovation Indicators
Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Scott Stern (MIT)
Report planned: Workshop summaryis being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held May 19-20, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Report: Workshop summary 
Upcoming meetings: TBD
 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Standing Committee on Creating the American Opportunity Study, First Phase

Sponsor: The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Duration: April 2015–March 2017

Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin

Chair: Michael Hout (NYU)

Reports: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee facilitated a workshop, May 9, 2016, on research uses of the American Opportunity Study (AOS), which is being developed to measure intergenerational mobility by linking 1990 census records (after capturing the necessary information) with subsequent census records, American Community Survey records, and administrative records that become available. The result will be a facility for researchers to obtain extracts of linked files for analysis within the Federal Statistical Research Data Center network (formerly the Census Bureau RDC network). The First-Phase AOS is to address the challenges of capturing linking information for the 1990 census short- and long-form records, to evaluate the likely quality of matches with other records, and to propose the next phase of work. A “workshop in brief” summary has been prepared for the May workshop and is in review; it will be followed by a full workshop summary. A website is maintained for the committee, which includes presentation slides from the May workshop.

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting TBD 



The Laura and John Arnold Foundation
  

Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods
Sponsor: The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Duration: April 2015–December 2017
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; research assistant: George Schoeffel; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Robert Groves (Georgetown University)
Report planned: Final report. A website is maintained for the project, which includes links to presentations from panel meetings. 
Upcoming meetings: Fifth meeting (closed) scheduled for September 23-24, 2016, in Woods Hole, MA


The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration
Sponsor: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Duration: May 2013–October 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Francine Blau (Cornell University)
Report planned: Final report is in response to review
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held September 11-12, 2015, in Washington, DC

 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News May 2016
CNSTAT News March 2016
CNSTAT News February 2016

CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 


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