Skip to Main Content
 
  
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

 

New CNSTAT Logo
 

 — July 7, 2017 — 

 

 People News 


We note with sadness the death of Eleanor Singer, academic survey researcher and research professor emerita of the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR), June 3, 2017, at age 87. She was a respected authority on American public opinion and the ethical practice of academic survey research, who had a prolific research career. She was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1930. In 1938, her family fled the rise of Nazi Germany in Europe and settled in Astoria, NY. She completed a B.A. in English at Queens College in 1951. In her early career, she worked as a book editor at various publishing houses and increasingly specialized in books about social science. She developed an interest in survey research and earned a Ph.D.in sociology from Columbia University in 1966. She went on to conduct research at Columbia University and the University of Chicago and worked as a social science analyst at the U.S. Bureau of the Census. She edited Public Opinion Quarterly from 1976-1987, a role that elevated survey methodology as an academic discipline. In 1994, she was recruited as a research professor at the ISR/SRC where she was the first woman to serve as the associate director of the SRC. She was active in the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR), including as president, and, in 1996, she received the AAPOR Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 2016, she received the Monroe G. Sirken Award in Interdisciplinary Survey Methods Research for “significant contributions in our understanding of survey participation, sources of nonresponse bias, and factors affecting survey responses; for pioneering research on the use and effects of incentives; and for leadership in developing awareness and understanding of ethical issues in survey research.” We at CNSTAT highly valued Eleanor’s contributions as chair and member of several study panels, including those that produced Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics (1993), Protecting Participants and Facilitating Social and Behavioral Sciences Research (2003), and Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities (2005).

We note with sadness that Monroe Sirken died May 24, 2017, at age 96, a week after being honored at a luncheon of the Senior Statisticians Society of the Washington DC metropolitan area, May 16, 2017. After earning his Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Washington and beginning his career at the U.S. Census Bureau, he moved to the National Office of Vital Statistics in 1953, which became part of the National Center for Health Statistics, where he held a variety of positions, including associate director, research and methodology, and director, Office of Research and Methodology. Monroe was a charter member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology, a fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI). He received the Public Health Service Superior Service Award and the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics. In 2014 he endowed the Monroe G. Sirken Award in Interdisciplinary Survey Methods Research. See the May CNSTAT newsletter for more details.

We congratulate CNSTAT member Francine Blau, Frances Perkins professor of industrial and labor relations and professor of economics at Cornell University, and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, on receiving the 2017 Jacob Mincer Career Achievement Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics from the Society of Labor Economists. She has written extensively on gender issues, wage inequality, immigration, and international comparisons of labor market outcomes. (She chaired the CNSTAT study that produced The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration (2017).) According to the award announcement, Fran’s first publication in 1972 while still a graduate student at Harvard, titled “Women’s Place in the Labor Market,” foreshadowed major themes of her research career and of labor economics more generally. She identified persistent occupational segregation of males and females as a major obstacle to women’s progress and showed that there had been little change in the degree of segregation despite rapid growth in female labor force participation after World War II. In addition, the ratio of female to male wages seemed stuck at three-fifths, a ratio that Victor Fuchs had traced back to biblical times. She identified important feedback effects on both the supply and demand side that resulted in a persistent equilibrium that relegated women to low wage female jobs. See the award announcement for how she continued to produce insightful analysis of women’s changing roles in the U.S. economy and related topics.

We congratulate Ron Jarmin and Enrique Lamas on their appointments by Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, effective June 30, 2017, to carry out the duties of the director and deputy director, respectively, of the U.S. Census Bureau. They are serving as interim leadership under the provisions of the Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, following John Thompson’s retirement as director on June 30 (there has been no deputy director since Nancy Potok became chief statistician in OMB in January 2017). Ron currently serves as the associate director for economic programs, having first joined the Bureau in 1992 and holding positions as chief of the Center for Economic Studies and assistant director for research and methodology. Enrique currently serves as the associate director for demographic programs. Beginning his career in 1980 in the Population Division, he has served as chief of the Population Division, assistant division chief in the Demographic Surveys Division, chief of the Poverty and Wealth Statistics Branch, and chief of the Labor Force and Transfer Programs Statistics Branch.

We congratulate former CNSTAT member Karen Kafadar, chair and Commonwealth professor in the Department of Statistics at the University of Virginia (UVA), on her election as the 114th president of the American Statistical Association. She will serve a 1-year term as president-elect beginning January 1, 2018; her term as president becomes effective January 1, 2019. Her research focuses on robust methods; exploratory data analysis; characterization of uncertainty in the physical, chemical, biological, and engineering sciences; and methodology for the analysis of screening trials, for which she has received numerous awards. Prior to her faculty appointment at UVA, Karen was a mathematical statistician at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); member of the technical staff at Hewlett Packard’s RF/Microwave R&D Department; fellow in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute; professor and Chancellor’s Scholar at the University of Colorado-Denver; and Rudy professor of statistics at Indiana University. She chairs the ASA’s Committee on Statistics in Forensic Science, serves on NIST’s Forensic Science Standards Board, and served as chair of CNSTAT’s sister Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics (CATS) and on many National Academies’ study committees. She is a fellow of the ASA and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the ISI. She has a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in statistics from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in statistics from Princeton University.

We congratulate Peter Miller, senior researcher for survey measurement at the U.S. Census Bureau and chief scientist in the Bureau’s Center for Adaptive Design, on receiving the 2017 AAPOR Award for Exceptionally Distinguished Achievement. From the award announcement: “Few people have contributed so much to the field in so many different ways as Peter Miller. His scholarly work, his work as a faculty member and administrator at Northwestern University, his more recent work at the Bureau of the Census, and his years of service to AAPOR have all left indelible marks on the field and on AAPOR. His commitment to quality and to transparency in research embody AAPOR’s highest ideals.” His service to AAPOR includes the posts of editor-in-chief of Public Opinion Quarterly from 2001 to 2008 and president in 2009-2010. He received the Harry W. O’Neill Award for Outstanding Achievement from the New York AAPOR Chapter and was named a fellow of the Midwest AAPOR Chapter in 2012. As AAPOR president, one of his major accomplishments was launching the Transparency Initiative, which has proven to be a particularly long-lasting and influential achievement. He also headed up the AAPOR committee that developed the proposal for the AAPOR-ASA Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology. He is presently co-chairing an AAPOR-ASA Survey Climate Task Force with Cynthia Clark, former administrator of the National Agricultural Statistics Service.

We congratulate Amy O’Hara who is joining the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, July 17, 2017. From 2014 until June 30, 2017, she was chief of the Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications (CARRA) in the research and methodology directorate at the U.S. Census Bureau. She began her career at the Bureau in 2004 as an economist/statistician in the Social, Economic, and Housing Statistics Division before moving to CARRA in 2008. Among other accomplishments in her efforts to integrate administrative records data into the full suite of Census Bureau processes, she led the 2010 Census Match Study—an unprecedented complete match/linkage of the full set of returns from the 2010 decennial census to a composite of administrative records data from eight federal agencies, used to examine differences in coverage and possible sources of error in both sources. She received an Arthur S. Flemming Award, recognizing outstanding achievement and leadership in federal government service, from the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, George Washington University, in 2012. She is a member of the CNSTAT study panel that produced Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime (2016) and is working on its final report. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Notre Dame.

We congratulate the following members of the Washington statistical community who have been elected as 2017 American Statistical Association Fellows. They will be recognized at the Joint Statistical Meetings in Baltimore, MD, August 1, 2017. [Note: This is an update from the May 2017 newsletter, in which we inadvertently omitted several new fellows.]
Michelle Dunn, senior adviser for data science training, diversity, and outreach, National Institutes of Health
Joe Fred Gonzalez, mathematical statistician, National Center for Health Statistics
Ron S. Jarmin, associate director for economic programs who, as noted above, is performing the duties of the director, U.S. Census Bureau
Thomas R. Krenzke, senior statistician, Westat
Jennifer D. Parker, senior statistician, National Center for Health Statistics
Katherine J. Thompson, mathematical statistician, U.S. Census Bureau
Daniell S. Toth, senior research mathematical statistician, Bureau of Labor Statistics

We thank John Thompson for his years of government service, most recently as director of the U.S. Census Bureau, from which position he retired June 30, 2017. John is an acknowledged expert in the field of social science research, with a special emphasis on large and complex surveys. Previously, he served as president and executive vice president for survey operations at NORC at the University of Chicago. He started at NORC in 2002 after a 27-year career at the U.S. Census Bureau, serving as one of the Bureau’s most senior career officers, with responsibility for many aspects of the 2000 census, including management, operations, and methodology. He served on CNSTAT from 2011-2013 and on panels that produced Envisioning the 2020 Census (2010) and Change and the 2020 Census: Not Whether But How (2011). He is a fellow of ASA and past chair of the association's Social Statistics Section and Committee on Fellows. He will be very much missed.

It is at this time of year that we thank outgoing members of CNSTAT for their service, welcome new members, and acknowledge continuing members. CNSTAT members, who serve pro bono to oversee CNSTAT’s portfolio, develop new project ideas, and stimulate conversations on improved statistical methods and information across the statistical and research communities, are appointed by the president of the National Academy of Sciences. They serve for 3-year terms, beginning July 1, with the opportunity for reappointment for a second term.

  • We thank profusely for their service outgoing members, Lawrence (Larry) Brown, Department of Statistics, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and Ruth Peterson, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice Research Center (emerita), Ohio State University. Larry, having previously served as a member of CNSTAT from 1999-2005, just stepped down as CNSTAT chair, having served in that capacity since 2010. Among his many other activities for CNSTAT and the National Academies, he served on the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) Advisory Committee, the Board on Mathematical Sciences, and the Report Review Committee, and chaired or served on the study panels that produced The 2000 Census: Counting Under Adversity (2004), Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Economy (2005), Coverage Measurement in the 2010 Census (2008), and Envisioning the 2020 Census (2010). Ruth served as a member from 2011-2017. Among her many other activities for CNSTAT and the National Academies, she serves as vice-chair of the Committee and Law and Justice (CLAJ) and served on the CNSTAT-CLAJ panels that produced Ensuring the Quality, Credibility, and Relevance of U.S. Justice Statistics (2009) and Estimating the Incidence of Rape and Sexual Assault (2014).

 

  • We welcome as incoming chair, Robert Groves, provost and Gerard Campbell professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics and Sociology, Georgetown University. Bob’s research has focused on the impact of mode of data collection on responses in sample surveys, the social and political influences on survey participation, the use of adaptive research designs to improve the cost and error properties of statistics, and public concerns about privacy affecting attitudes toward statistical agencies. Prior to joining Georgetown, he was director of the U.S. Census Bureau, and before that director of the University of Michigan Survey Research Center, professor of sociology, and research professor at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the ISI, and an elected fellow of the ASA. His 1989 book, Survey Errors and Survey Costs, was named one of the 50 most influential books in survey research by AAPOR. His service to CNSTAT and the National Academies has included membership on CNSTAT from 2000-2006, membership on the DBASSE Advisory Committee, and service as chair or member of study panels that produced The Bureau of Transportation Statistics: Priorities for the Future (1997), The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs (2002), and Ensuring the Quality, Credibility, and Relevance of U.S. Justice Statistics (2009), He is currently chairing the panel that produced Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Data Sources While Protecting Privacy (2017) and is preparing its final report. He has a B.A. from Dartmouth College and M.A.s in statistics and sociology and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

We welcome as incoming members, Anne Case, Department of Economics, Princeton University; Jerome Reiter, Department of Statistics, Duke University; and Judith Seltzer, Department of Sociology, UCLA:

  • Anne Case is the Alexander Stewart 1886 professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University. She is also the director of the Research Program in Development Studies and a faculty fellow in the Center for Health and Wellbeing and the Office of Population Research. Her main research interests are in microeconomic foundations of development, health, and economics of the family. She currently serves on the Advisory Council for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the President's Committee on the National Medal of Science. She is a research associate of the NBER, a fellow of the Econometric Society, and an affiliate of the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit at the University of Cape Town. She served on the National Academies’ Committee on Population. She has received the Kenneth J. Arrow Prize in Health Economics from the International Health Economics Association for her work on the links between economic status and health status in childhood, and the Cozzarelli Prize from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences for her research on midlife morbidity and mortality. She has a B.A. from the State University of New York at Albany and an M.P.A. and Ph.D. in economics from Princeton. 


  • Jerry Reiter is professor of statistical science at Duke University. He previously held positions with the University of California, Santa Barbara, Williams College, the Triangle Research Data Center, and the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. His methodological research focuses mainly on data confidentiality, missing data, and survey methodology. He currently serves on the CNSTAT Standing Committee for the American Opportunity Study-Phase 1. He previously served on CNSTAT study panels that produced Reengineering the Survey of Income and Program Participation (2009), Conducting Biosocial Surveys: Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biological Specimens and Biodata (2010), and Realizing the Potential of the American Community Survey (2015). He is a fellow of the ASA, an elected member of the ISI, principal investigator of the Triangle Census Research Network (funded by the National Science Foundation to improve the practice of data dissemination among federal statistical agencies), and deputy director of the Information Initiative at Duke, an institute dedicated to research and applications in the analysis of large-scale (and not large-scale) data. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Duke University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University. 


  • Judy Seltzer is professor of sociology and director of the California Center for Population Research at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. Her research interests include kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonresident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other policies affect family change. She also explores ways to improve the quality of survey data on families. She currently serves on the CNSTAT Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations and previously served on the study panels that produced Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census (2006), Envisioning the 2020 Census (2010), and Change and the 2020 Census: Not Whether But How (2011). She is a past president of the Population Association of America and previously served on the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey. She has a B.A. in sociology from Princeton University and both an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.


We acknowledge with gratitude the continuing service of the following CNSTAT members:

  • Francine Blau, Department of Economics, Cornell University
  • Mary Ellen Bock, Department of Statistics, Purdue University (emerita)
  • Michael Chernew, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School
  • Janet Currie, Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs, Princeton University
  • Don Dillman, Center for Survey Research, Washington State University
  • Constantine Gatsonis, Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University
  • James House, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan (emeritus)
  • Thomas Mesenbourg, Deputy Director (retired), U.S. Census Bureau
  • Susan Murphy, Department of Statistics, University of Michigan
  • Sarah Nusser, Vice President for Research and Department of Statistics, Iowa State University
  • Colm O’Muircheartaigh, Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago
  • Roberto Rigobon, Sloan School of Management, MIT
  • Edward Shortliffe, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Arizona State University and Columbia University


We announce with pride that Brian Harris-Kojetin will be the sixth director of the Committee on National Statistics, effective July 8, 2017. He joined CNSTAT in spring 2015 as deputy director and study director for the panel that produced Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Data Sources While Protecting Privacy (2017) and is working on its final report. He was previously senior statistician in the OMB Statistical and Science Policy Office, where he chaired the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology and was the lead on issues related to standards for statistical surveys, survey nonresponse, survey respondent incentives, and the Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (CIPSEA). He also served as the desk officer for the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the demographic programs of the U.S. Census Bureau. Prior to joining OMB in 2001, he was the senior project leader of Research Standards and Practices at the Arbitron Company. He also served as a research psychologist in the Office of Survey Methods Research in the Bureau of Labor Statistics. He is a fellow of the ASA. He has a B.A. from the University of Denver and a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Minnesota. 

Constance Citro is stepping down as director, effective July 8, having served in that position since 2004. She will continue with CNSTAT in a part-time capacity as senior scholar. She has greatly appreciated the opportunity to lead CNSTAT’s outstanding staff and work with its outstanding volunteers on behalf of federal statistics and is looking forward to continuing to be of service in her new role. She began her career with CNSTAT in 1984 as study director for the panel that produced The Bicentennial Census: New Directions for Methodology in 1990 (1985; reissued in 2015 in a 30th anniversary edition). Prior to joining CNSTAT, she held positions as vice president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and Data Use and Access Laboratories, Inc. She was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation/Census research fellow in 1985-1986, and is a fellow of the ASA and an elected member of the ISI. She received the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics in 1997 and the Waksberg Award in Survey Methodology in 2014. For CNSTAT, she directed evaluations of the 2000 census, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, microsimulation models for social welfare programs, and the NSF science and engineering personnel data system, in addition to studies on institutional review boards and social science research, estimates of poverty for small geographic areas, data and methods for retirement income modeling, and a new approach for measuring poverty. She co-edited the 2nd–5th editions and edited the 6th edition of Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency, and contributed to studies on measuring racial discrimination, expanding access to research data, the usability of estimates from the American Community Survey, the National Children’s Study research plan, and the Census Bureau’s 2010 census program of experiments and evaluations. She received her B.A. in political science from the University of Rochester and her M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from Yale University. 

 

 

 Publication News Header 


Improving Motor Carrier Safety Measurement, released in prepublication format, June 20, 2017, is the final report of the Panel on the Review of the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), co-chaired by Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon University) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School). The report is available in PDF and will be available in print shortly. The study was congressionally mandated and carried out jointly with the Transportation Research Board.
Every year roughly 100,000 fatal and injury crashes occur in the United States involving large trucks and buses. FMCSA, in the U.S. Department of Transportation, works to reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. FMCSA uses information that is collected on the frequency of approximately 900 different violations of safety regulations discovered during (mainly) roadside inspections to assess motor carriers’ compliance with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations, as well as to evaluate their compliance in comparison with their peers. Through use of this information, FMCSA’s Safety Measurement System (SMS) identifies carriers to receive its available interventions in order to reduce the risk of crashes across all carriers. Improving Motor Carrier Safety Measurement examines the effectiveness of SMS, finding that its conceptual approach for assessing motor carrier safety culture is sound but recommending that its ad hoc model be replaced with a statistically principled item response theory (IRT) model. IRT models are used to evaluate safety and quality in other settings (e.g., health care). The report also recommends improvements in data for input to an improved model.

Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition, released on-line, July 6, 2017, is a report of CNSTAT acting as a committee of the whole. The first edition of P&P, also known as the “purple book,” was released in 1992, and, beginning in 2001, new editions have been prepared every 4 years to be available to new appointees and others at the beginning of a presidential term. CNSTAT director Connie Citro edited this edition, which is dedicated to CNSTAT’s 3rd director, Miron Straf. The 6th edition has been reformatted for ease of access; the on-line version, available as a PDF, contains the body plus appendixes on legislation and regulations that govern federal statistics and the organization of the federal statistical system, with links to sections of the report and references. Printed copies will be available in a few weeks; the printed version contains the body only. Summing up P&P’s message:

Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency...is intended to support the invaluable role of widely available, trustworthy, relevant, accurate, and timely government statistics. Such statistics are essential not only for policy makers and program administrators at all government levels, but also for individuals, households, businesses, and other organizations to make informed decisions, and for scientists to add to knowledge. Even more broadly, the effective operation of a democratic system of government depends on the unhindered flow of impartial, scientifically based statistical information to its citizens on a wide range of issues...In the United States, federal statistical agencies...are the entities whose principal function is to compile, analyze, and disseminate information for such statistical uses as monitoring key economic indicators, allocating representation and funds, deciding on the location of services, evaluating programs, and conducting scientific research. Statistical uses encompass only descriptions of groups; they exclude interest in or identification of any individual person, institution, or economic unit. To facilitate understanding, statistical agencies may analyze their data to describe trends, make comparisons, and evaluate data quality, but never to advocate policies or take partisan positions. The work of these agencies is coordinated by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget...Statistical agency decisions—managerial, programmatic, and technical—are guided by four well-established and fundamental principles: relevance to policy issues, credibility among data users, trust among data providers, and independence from political and other undue external influence.


Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation: Proceedings of a Workshop, issued in prepublication format, July 7, 2017, summarizes the presentations and discussions at a workshop, October 27, 2016, chaired by Grover (Russ) Whitehurst (Brookings Institution) for the Administration for Children and Families and Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Institute of Education Sciences; U.S. Department of Labor; and OMB. It is available as a PDF; printed copies will be available shortly. The scope of the workshop included evaluations of interventions, programs, and practices intended to affect human behavior, carried out by the federal government or its contractual agents and leading to public reports intended to provide information on impacts, cost, and implementation. Workshop participants commented on existing agency policies, which reference such principles as rigor, relevance, transparency, independence, and ethics, as well as objectivity, clarity, reproducibility, and usefulness. Participants also considered ways to strengthen existing practices and institutionalize the principles. The goal would be to bolster the integrity and protect the objectivity of the evaluation function in federal agencies—which is essential for evidence-based policy making. A proceedings in brief was issued for the workshop in March 2017.


 Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT public seminars and symposia page. Presentations from the October 2016 CNSTAT meeting public seminar, "Taking Surveys to People's Technology: Implications for Federal Statistics and Social Science Research," are available here.

Slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. This page also includes a section on “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.

  

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 

 
CNSTAT’s 134th meeting will be held October 19-20, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 20th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

CNSTAT’s 135th meeting will be held February 9-10, 2018, at the National Academies Beckman Center in Irvine, CA. It will be in retreat format; it will not have a public seminar or agency head luncheon.

CNSTAT’s 136th meeting will be held May 10-11, 2018, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 11th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.
               

 

 AP Header


[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Panel on Methods for Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Improve Crop Estimates
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2014–September 2017
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Mary Ellen Bock (Purdue University)
Publication planned: Final report is in review
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and final in-person (closed) scheduled for May 30-31, 2017, in Irvine, CA

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting scheduled for September 11-12, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty [on hold]
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Publication: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Sixth and final meeting held June 8-9, 2017

Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2013–November 2016
Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin; research assistant: Adrienne Bradford
Chair: John Czajka (Mathematica Policy Research)
Publication planned: Final report is in review
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and last meeting held October 10-11, 2016, in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: Ninth meeting scheduled for August 24-25, 2017, in Washington DC

 

Department of Education
 

 Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity (see listing under "The Atlantic Philanthropies et al." below)


 

Department of Health and Human Services

 
Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years
(joint with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, which has the lead)
Sponsors: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Foundation for Child Development
Duration: October 2016–April 2019
Study director: Suzanne Le Menestrel (BCYF); senior program officer: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Rebekah Hutton (BCYF); project assistant: Pamella Atayi (BCYF)
Chair: Greg Duncan (UC Irvine)
Publication: Final report
Meetings: Third meeting scheduled for August 17-18, 2017 in Washington, DC

Workshop on Improving Health Research on Small Subpopulations
(joint with the Health and Medicine Division)
Sponsor: National Cancer Institute
Duration: March 2017–July 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Workshop on a Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation
Sponsors: Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services); U.S. Department of Labor; Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education); and U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: Grover (Russ) Whitehurst, Brookings Institution
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief was released March 20, 2017, and is available as a PDF and in print; full proceedings was released in prepublication format, July 7, 2017, and is available as a PDF; printed copies will be available shortly
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held October 27, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Research Agenda for Longitudinal Studies
Sponsor: National Institute on Aging, Division of Behavioral and Social Research
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: James Jackson (University of Michigan and Russell Sage Foundation)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief is being drafted; presentation slides from the workshop are available here
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held June 5-6, 2017 in Washington, DC
                            
 

Department of Justice
 

Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Publications planned: First report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, was released in prepublication format, May 16, 2016; printed copies and free PDFs are available; second report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Final in-person meeting (closed) held January 13-14 2017, in Coral Gables, FL

 
 

Department of Transportation


Panel to Review the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (joint with the Transportation Research Board)
Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
Duration: March 2016–September 2017
Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Richard Pain; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Stephen Godwin; project assistant: Michael Siri; summer intern: Andrew Yarger; off-site research associate: Jacob Spertus (Harvard)
Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School)
Publication planned: Final report, Improving Motor Carrier Safety Measurement, was released in prepublication format, June 20, 2017, and is available in PDF; printed copies will be available shortly
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting held February 16-17, 2017: fifth meeting TBD
 
 

National Science Foundation

 
Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Sixth and final meeting held July 6-7, 2017, in Washington, DC


Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held June 21-22, 2017


The Atlantic Philanthropies, the Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the U.S.
Department of Education, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the W.T. Grant Foundation

Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity
Sponsors: See above list
Duration: December 2016–December 2018
Study director: Judith Koenig; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistants: Kelly Arrington (beginning April 2017) and Agnes Gaskin (January–April 2017)
Co-chairs: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley); Lorraine McDonnell (UC Santa Barbara)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Second in-person meeting scheduled for October 2-3, 2017, in Washington, DC


The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Standing Committee on Creating the American Opportunity Study, First Phase

Sponsor: The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Duration: April 2015–March 2017

Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin

Chair: Michael Hout (NYU)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee facilitated a workshop, May 9, 2016, on research uses of the American Opportunity Study (AOS), which is being developed to measure intergenerational mobility by linking 1990 census records (after capturing the necessary information) with subsequent census records, American Community Survey records, and administrative records that become available. The result will be a facility for researchers to obtain extracts of linked files for analysis within the Federal Statistical Research Data Center network (formerly the Census Bureau RDC network). The First-Phase AOS is to address the challenges of capturing linking information for the 1990 census short-form and long-form records, to evaluate the likely quality of matches with other records, and to propose the next phase of work.  A “workshop in brief” proceedings of the May workshop was released July 19, 2016, and is available for download as a free PDF. Presentation slides from the May workshop are also available.

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting TBD  

 
 

 
 The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

  

Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods
Sponsor: The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Duration: April 2015–December 2017
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; research assistant: George Schoeffel; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Robert Groves (Georgetown University)
Publication planned: Two reports; first report, Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Information While Protecting Privacy, was released in prepublication format, January 12, 2017 (see “Publication News” above); second report is being drafted; a website is maintained for the panel.  
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held for March 16-17, 2017, in Washington, DC
 

 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News May 2017

CNSTAT News April 2017
CNSTAT News March 2017

CNSTAT News 2016
CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 


Home BOHSI Home Home BOSE Home C-CAB Home BECS Home BCYF Home TAC Home Home BOTA Home CPOP Home CNSTAT Home CLAJ Home BBCSS Home About BOSE BOSE Mission BOSE Members BOSE Staff Our Sponsors Visiting our Buildings About BBCSS BBCSS History BBCSS Members BBCSS Staff Our Sponsors About CPOP CPOP Mission CPOP Members CPOP Staff About TAC TAC History TAC Members TAC Associates by State TAC Staff About CNSTAT CNSTAT Members CNSTAT Staff CNSTAT Mission Other Sites of Interest TEstTAc2 About BOTA BOTA Mission BOTA Members BOTA Staff Visiting Our Buildings About CLAJ CLAJ Mission CLAJ Members CLAJ Staff Other Sites of Interest About BECS BECS in Brief BECS Brochure BECS Statement of Task BECS Members BECS Staff About BCYF BCYF History BCYF Graphic Illustration BCYF Members BCYF Staff About BOHSI BOHSI History BOHSI Members BOHSI Staff Our Sponsors