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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

 

New CNSTAT Logo
 

 — March 16, 2017 — 

 

 People News 


We were saddened to learn of the death of Sir Anthony B. Atkinson, fellow, Nuffield College, Oxford, and centennial professor, London School of Economics, on January 1, 2017, at age 72. He was one of the earliest and foremost scholars of inequality in income and wealth, using tax and other data to develop historical records for the United Kingdom and United States. His final book, Inequality: What Can Be Done? (2015), summed up decades of findings and offered 15 proposals for tackling inequality worldwide. He was known to CNSTAT as a very constructive member of the panel that produced Measuring Poverty: A New Approach in 1995. See obituaries for him in the New York Times; the Economist; and Le Blog of Thomas Piketty, who studied and collaborated with him.

We were also saddened to learn of the recent death of Dorothy Rice, professor emerita of health economics, UC San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing, on February 25, 2017, in Oakland, CA, at age 94. Dorothy was a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a member of CNSTAT from 1988-1994; she chaired the IOM-CNSTAT Committee to Review the Social Security Administration’s Disability Decision Process Research and was a member of the CNSTAT Panel on Statistics for an Aging Population, the Committee to Identify Strategies to Raise the Profile of Research on Substance Abuse and Alcoholism, and the Committee on a National Agenda for the Prevention of Disabilities, among other Academies’ studies.

She had a truly remarkable career, first in government service, and then in academia. (See obituaries for her in the New York Times and the UCSF School of Nursing on-line news.) Her last government position was as the first (and only) woman director of the National Center for Health Statistics from 1976-1982 (frustrated by budget cuts, she resigned during the Reagan Administration). She is celebrated for her work at the Social Security Administration during the 1960s that made the case for a program like Medicare to serve the elderly, particularly women, many of whom had no health insurance at the time, and for her later work on the costs of illness and the economic costs of smoking. The current NCHS director, Charlie Rothwell, recalled in a recent e-mail:

I had the pleasure of knowing Dorothy when she became Director of NCHS in 1976 while I was in North Carolina Health Department working in the area of health statistics and was stunned by her energy and enthusiasm. . . . Among the many achievements during her work as Director of NCHS was approving the launch of the National Death Index (NDI) which has served health researchers throughout the United States so well over these many years. If I remember correctly she began her Federal service as a clerical worker in the Social Security Administration before WWII and worked her way up to being in the Senior Executive Service. She served as an example to everyone and especially women that anything is possible if you have the intelligence, commitment, knowledge and persistence to succeed.

We congratulate Nancy Potok on her new position, which she assumed January 17, 2017, as chief statistician of the United States and head of the Statistical and Science Policy Office, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Nancy, who succeeds Katherine Wallman (see below), brings an outstanding combination of expertise and experience to the position, which is critical for the effective operation of the decentralized federal statistical system, particularly in an era of budget stringencies. She was previously deputy director and chief operating officer of the U.S. Census Bureau, associate director for demographic programs, and principal associate director and chief financial officer in charge of field operations, information technology, and administration during the 2000 Census. She has more than 30 years of public, private, and nonprofit senior management experience, serving at the U.S. Department of Transportation, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, and the U.S. Department of Commerce as deputy undersecretary for economic affairs. She has also served as senior vice president and director of the Economic, Labor and Population Studies Department at NORC at the University of Chicago, and as chief operating officer of the management consulting firm McManis & Monsalve Associates. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA), and a recipient of numerous awards, including the George Washington University Trachtenberg School Distinguished Alumni Award, the Secretary of Commerce’s Silver Medal, and the Arthur S. Flemming Award. She has a B.A. from Sonoma State University, an M.A.S. from the University of Alabama, and a Ph.D. from George Washington University. We wish her all the best.

We congratulate Kitty Smith Evans on her new part-time position, beginning March 1, 2017, as Washington representative for the American Economic Association. In this capacity, she works with the AEA Committee on Government Operations and Committee on Economic Statistics. She succeeds Dan Newlon, who did an outstanding job in this role. Kitty is continuing part-time as executive director of the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics (COPAFS), until the organization finds her replacement. Before assuming her position at COPAFS in October 2012, Kitty was administrator of the USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) and previously held other leadership positions and conducted research at ERS. Her principal areas of expertise have been policy analysis, particularly agricultural and resource policies, and the empirical relationships among agricultural production and environmental quality. She is a fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and, while with ERS, received the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Executives. Kitty has a B.S. and a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Maryland.

We thank profusely and wish all the best to Katherine Wallman, who retired as chief statistician of the United States, January 3, 2017, after 24 years of service in that position. During her tenure as chief statistician, she increased collaboration among the agencies of the U.S. statistical system, fostered improvements in the scope and quality of the nation’s official statistics, strengthened the protections for confidential statistical information, and initiated changes that made the products of the system more accessible and usable. Prior to assuming the position of chief statistician in 1992, she served for more than a decade as the first executive director of COPAFS, a coalition of organizations concerned with fostering communication among users and producers of federal statistics and improving the utility and accessibility of the nation’s statistical resources. Before that, she served with various incarnations of the Statistical Policy Office and with the National Center for Education Statistics. Katherine—twice honored as a Presidential Meritorious Executive—is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI), a fellow of both the American Statistical Association (ASA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and a founding member of the International Association for Official Statistics (IAOS). In 1992, she served as president of ASA, and, in 2007, she was honored with the association’s Founders Award. She has also been honored with the Robert G. Damus Award for significant, sustained contributions to the integrity and excellence of OMB (2009) and the Population Association of America’s Excellence in Public Service Award (2011). At the international level, she served as chair of the U.N. Statistical Commission, chair of the Conference of European Statisticians for the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe, and vice chair of OECD’s Statistics Committee.

CNSTAT has long treasured its special relationship with Katherine over the past 30+ years. As COPAFS executive director, she regularly briefed CNSTAT on developments in and concerns for federal statistics. As chief statistician, she helped CNSTAT organize useful luncheon discussion topics at its May and October meetings with the heads of the members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, which she chaired. At CNSTAT’s public seminars at those meetings, she always led off with 10-15 minutes on “recent developments in federal statistics” for the benefit of the large audience that regularly attends. At its May 12, 2017, meeting, CNSTAT will honor Katherine with a seminar devoted to a topic that represents one of her signal achievements, namely, the 2002 Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act (CIPSEA), which for the first time provided strong legal protection to all federal information collected under a pledge of confidentiality for statistical purposes. Please join us (information will be forthcoming soon on registration).

For more information on Katherine’s background and career, see an interview in the February 1, 2016, issue of Amstat News, and a conversation with Katherine in the October 29, 2015, issue of International Statistical Review (should you have access to that publication). The ISR interview closes with the true statement that “Katherine is a national and world treasure.” The statistical community and the research and policy analysis communities that use statistical data are in her debt.

We thank the following heads of principal federal statistical agencies who stepped down early in 2017:

Erica Groshen completed her four-year term as Bureau of Labor Statistics commissioner on January 27, 2017. Bill Wiatrowski, BLS deputy commissioner, is acting until Erica’s replacement is nominated by the president and confirmed by the U.S. Senate for a four-year fixed term. Prior to her confirmation as commissioner in January 2013, Erica was vice president of the Research and Statistics Group at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Before joining the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in 1994, she was a visiting assistant professor of economics at Barnard College at Columbia University and an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She was a visiting economist at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, from 1999 to 2000. She has served on advisory boards for BLS and the U.S. Census Bureau. Her research focuses on labor markets over the business cycle, regional economics, wage rigidity and dispersion, the male-female wage differential, and the role of employers in labor market outcomes. Her last posting on the BLS commissioner’s blog, “Innovating for the Future,” January 30, 2017, highlighted initiatives during her tenure to use alternative data sources and in other ways make BLS programs more cost-effective and relevant for users.
Adam Sieminski served for over four and a half years as administrator of the Energy Information Administration, having been confirmed by the U.S. Senate in May 2012 and stepping down when the new administration took office. Howard Gruenspecht, EIA deputy administrator, is acting until Adam’s replacement is nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate. Adam is currently James R. Schlesinger chair for energy and geopolitics, Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. From March to May 2012, while awaiting confirmation as EIA administrator, he served as a senior director on the staff of the National Security Council. From 2005 to March 2012, he was the chief energy economist for Deutsche Bank, and from 1998 to 2005, he served as the director and energy strategist for Deutsche Bank’s global oil and gas equity team. Prior to that, he was the senior energy analyst for NatWest Securities in the United States, covering the major U.S. international integrated oil companies. His initiatives while at EIA included encouraging the agency to use “big data” to improve the relevance and timeliness of key statistics and to expand state-level information, including publication beginning in late 2016 of near real-time hourly electricity operating characteristics as an experimental (beta) series.

We thank the following distinguished public servants, who retired at the end of 2016, for their many years of hard and dedicated work in the service of federal statistics, evidence-based policy, and social science research:

Howard Iams, who retired after 40 years of government service, all but two with the Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics (ORES) (and its predecessors) in the Social Security Administration. At the time of his retirement, Howard was acting director of the Office of Policy Evaluation and Modeling. Howard conducted extensive research with SSA’s microsimulation models, in particular, MINT (Modeling Income in the Near Term), which simulates the effects of policy alternatives and economic scenarios on individual and family income by linking longitudinal survey data from the Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to Social Security earnings records.
Patricia White, who retired after 30 years with the National Science Foundation. She was program director, sociology, Division of Social and Economic Sciences, Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences directorate. Several years ago, she spent a detail with CNSTAT’s sister Committee on Population Statistics. The Sociology Program oversaw, among other research, the General Social Survey (GSS), which since 1972 has collected topical data on American social behaviors and attitudes.

We note that Brent Moulton, who retired last fall as associate director for national economic accounts at the Bureau of Economic Analysis (see the December 2016 “News from CNSTAT”), has a blog, “Political Arithmetick,” with the first entry appearing on January 17, 2017. He posts about issues concerning federal statistics, including principles, concepts, and measurement. We encourage readers to check it out.

We note that John Thompson’s term as U.S. Census Bureau director expired at the end of 2016 but are delighted to report that he was asked to and did accept another year of appointment (through the end of 2017), as provided for in the Presidential Appointment Efficiency and Streamlining Act of 2011 (which became effective August 2012). He is eligible to serve a second term extending through December 2021, should he be nominated by the president and confirmed by the U.S. Senate. John is an acknowledged expert in the field of social science research, with a special emphasis on large and complex surveys. Previously, he served as president and executive vice president for survey operations at NORC at the University of Chicago. He started at NORC in 2002 after a 27-year career at the U.S. Census Bureau, serving as one of the Bureau’s most senior career officers, with responsibility for many aspects of the 2000 Census, including management, operations, and methodology. He served on CNSTAT from 2011-2013 and on the Panel to Review the 2010 Census, the Committee on Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Fifth Edition, and the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and past chair of the association's Social Statistics Section and Committee on Fellows.

Personal Note from Connie: As long-term readers of this newsletter may remember, about two years ago, I expressed great satisfaction at having been able to hire Brian Harris-Kojetin from the OMB Statistical Policy Office to become deputy director of CNSTAT with an immediate assignment as study director of our project on using multiple data sources and state-of-the-art methods for federal statistics. Funded by the Arnold Foundation, the study panel has issued a great (if I do say so) first report (see “Publication News” below) and is working hard to complete its final report. I indicated at the time that I planned to step down as CNSTAT director in June 2017 when I would turn 75. I plan to carry through on that intention. On or about June 30, Brian will become CNSTAT director. I know he will do a fantastic job. For myself, I am honored to have been asked to continue in a part-time capacity with CNSTAT.

The time is right for this transition. My devotion to the cause of federal statistics remains undiminished, but my energy is not what it was. Also, my husband and I need to make some improvements to our 100+-year-old townhouse on Capitol Hill, and we are dealing with the health care system more often than we would like. As some of you are aware (and we have very much appreciated your expressions of support), my husband was diagnosed with lymphoma in June 2016 and underwent 6 rounds of chemotherapy. His scans at the end of December were clear, and we hope that his cancer will stay at bay. That said, he was warned that it could be 6 months before he felt “normal.” I, too, have been recovering (from the intensity of caregiving) and am almost there, so newsletters should be back on a regular schedule, particularly now that the 6th edition of P&P is in review (see below)!

 

 Publication News Header 


CNSTAT first issued Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency (P&P, or “the purple book”) in 1992. Beginning with the second edition in 2001, CNSTAT determined that it would be useful to issue a new edition every 4 years to coincide with a new administration or second term. The fifth edition was issued in 2013. The 6th edition, which has been redesigned to be as Internet-friendly as possible, with hot links throughout the document and with each of the four principles and 13 practices having its own chapter, was sent to the Academies’ rigorous independent review process on March 9, 2017, with reviewer comments due back no later than the end of March. CNSTAT will prepare a formal response to the comments, and once the response is deemed satisfactory, will release the 6th edition as a prepublication so that it is available as soon as possible to statistical agencies and new political appointees who oversee the agencies.

In regard to important publications for federal statistics, the Statistical and Science Policy Office issued Statistical Programs of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2017 on January 10, 2017. Known as “the blue book,” this publication is a must-have resource for information on the programs, not only of the principal statistical agencies, but also of the 115 or so agencies that conduct statistical programs of $500K or more. Note that the URL for the blue book is not part of the White House web site; rather, the entire Obama White House web site (including OMB, OIRA, and SSP) has been put into an “archived” location, with a notice that the site is not being maintained. To reach archived SSP materials, you need to go to https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/, and then click on “the administration,” “Office of Management and Budget,” “regulation and information,” and “statistical programs and standards.” It is to be hoped that portions of the Obama White House archived site of continuing value, such as the statistical policy and standards documents, will be restored to the main White House site.

Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Data Sources While Protecting Privacy, released in prepublication format, January 12, 2017, is the first report of the Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods, chaired by Robert M. Groves (Georgetown University), and sponsored by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. The report, edited, by Robert Groves and Brian Harris-Kojetin, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

Federal government statistics provide critical information to the country and serve a key role in a democracy. For decades, sample surveys with instruments carefully designed for particular data needs have been one of the primary methods for collecting data for federal statistics. However, the costs of conducting such surveys have been increasing while response rates have been declining, and many surveys are not able to fulfill growing demands for more timely information and for more detailed information at state and local levels. Innovations in Federal Statistics examines the opportunities and risks of using government administrative and private sector data sources to foster a paradigm shift in federal statistical programs that would combine diverse data sources in a secure manner to enhance federal statistics. This first publication of a two-part series discusses the challenges faced by the federal statistical system and the foundational elements needed for a new paradigm.

Evaluation of Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016, is the final report of the Committee on the Evaluation of NAEP Mathematics and Reading Levels, chaired by Christopher Edley, Jr. (UC Berkeley), and sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics. The report, edited by Christopher Edley, Jr., and Judith Koenig, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has been providing policymakers, educators, and the public with reports on academic performance and progress of the nation’s students. The assessment is given periodically in a variety of subjects: mathematics, reading, writing, science, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and technology and engineering literacy. NAEP is given to representative samples of students across the United States to assess the educational progress of the nation as a whole. Since 1992, NAEP results have been reported in relation to three achievement levels: basic, proficient, and advanced. However, the use of achievement levels has provoked controversy and disagreement, and evaluators have identified numerous concerns. This publication evaluates the NAEP student achievement levels in reading and mathematics in grades 4, 8, and 12 to determine whether the achievement levels are reasonable, reliable, valid, and informative to the public, and recommends ways that the setting and use of achievement levels can be improved.

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, released in prepublication format, September 21, 2016, is the final report of the Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, chaired by Francine Blau (Cornell University) and sponsored by the John T. and Catherine D. MacArthur Foundation and the Independent Funds of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report, edited by Francine Blau and Christopher Mackie, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly. The report has been covered in at least 148 media articles, and has been downloaded almost 10,000 times by people in at least 22 countries.

More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, the first generation (foreign-born) and second generation (children of the foreign-born) comprise almost one in four Americans. It comes as little surprise, then, that many U.S. residents view immigration as a major policy issue facing the nation. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts with nearly every policy area of concern, from jobs and the economy, education, and health care, to federal, state, and local government budgets. The changing patterns of immigration and the evolving consequences for American society, institutions, and the economy continue to fuel public policy debate that plays out at the national, state, and local levels. The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration assesses the impact of dynamic immigration processes on economic and fiscal outcomes for the United States.

 


REPORTS RELEASED IN FALL 2016 NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINTED FORM (& as free PDFs)

Advancing Concepts and Models for Measuring Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop (first released as a prepublication, September 16, 2016)

Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop (first released as a prepublication, December 16, 2016)

Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop (first released as a prepublication, September 19, 2016)


Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT public seminars and symposia page. Presentations from the October 2016 CNSTAT meeting public seminar, "Taking Surveys to People's Technology: Implications for Federal Statistics and Social Science Research," are available here.

Slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. This page also includes a section on “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.

  

 
Event Other News

It is not too late to submit nominations for the 2017 Julius Shiskin Memorial Award for Economic Statistics—the due date is March 21, 2017. Please see the announcement at the end of this newsletter.

The 2017 Federal Computer Assisted Survey Information Collection (FedCASIC) Workshops will be held April 11-12, 2017, at U.S. Census Bureau headquarters in Suitland, MD, and cover topics related to the use of technology in government surveys. John Abowd, associate director for research and methodology at the Census Bureau, is the keynote speaker. General registration and participation submission information are available here.

The spring 2017 meeting of the NSF-Census Research Network (NCRN) will be held April 24, 2017, at the Census Bureau’s headquarters in Suitland, MD. Topics will include: linkage and geography, privacy and confidentiality, 2020 census cost-benefit analysis, and the 2017 economic census. Registration and program information are available here.

The Population Association of America (PAA) annual meeting will feature a session, 10:15–11:45 am, April 28, 2017, on the CNSTAT report, The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration. The PAA meeting is being held at the Hilton Chicago. The session will be chaired by Francine Blau (who chaired the study panel) and include presentations by several panel members. Registration and program information are available here.
 

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 

 
CNSTAT’s 133rd meeting will be held May 11-12, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 12th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm. The seminar will honor an important achievement of Katherine Wallman, former chief statistician of the United States, and will be titled Fifteen Years of CIPSEA (Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002): Benefits and Future Needs.

CNSTAT’s 134th meeting will be held October 19-20, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 20th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

CNSTAT’s 135th meeting will be held February 9-10, 2018, at the National Academies Beckman Center in Irvine, CA. It will be in retreat format; it will not have a public seminar or agency head luncheon.
               

 

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[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Panel on Methods for Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Improve Crop Estimates
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2014–September 2017
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Mary Ellen Bock (Purdue University)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and final in-person (closed) scheduled for May 30-31, 2017, in Irvine, CA

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Third meeting scheduled for May 24-25, 2017 at UC Davis (CA)

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty [on hold]
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Publication: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Sixth and final meeting (closed) scheduled for June 8-9, 2017

Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2013–November 2016
Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin; research assistant: Adrienne Bradford
Chair: John Czajka (Mathematica Policy Research)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and last meeting held October 10-11, 2016, in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: Ninth meeting TBD

 

Department of Education
 

Committee on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Achievement Levels Evaluation (joint with the Board on Testing and Assessment, which has the lead)
Sponsor: National Center for Education Statistics
Duration: September 2014–July 2016
Study director: Judith Koenig (BOTA); program officer: Jordyn White (CNSTAT); project assistant: Kelly Arrington (BOTA)
Chair: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley)
Publication planned: Final report, Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, was released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Eighth and last meeting (closed) held November 16-17, 2015, in Irvine, CA

Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity (see listing under "The Atlantic Philanthropies et al." below)

 

Department of Health and Human Services

 
Workshop on Improving Health Research on Small Subpopulations
(joint with the Health and Medicine Division)
Sponsor: National Cancer Institute
Duration: March 2017–July 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD

Workshop on a Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation
Sponsors: Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services); U.S. Department of Labor; Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education); and U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: Grover (Russ) Whitehurst, Brookings Institution
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief has cleared review and will be released shortly; a full proceedings is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held October 27, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Research Agenda for Longitudinal Studies
Sponsor: National Institute on Aging, Division of Behavioral and Social Research
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: James Jackson (University of Michigan and Russell Sage Foundation)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief
Upcoming meetings: Workshop scheduled for June 5-6, 2017 in Washington, DC
                            
 

Department of Justice
 

Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Publications planned: First report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, was released in prepublication format, May 16, 2016; printed copies and free PDFs are available; second report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Final in-person meeting (closed) held January 13-14 2017, in Coral Gables, FL

 
 

Department of Transportation


Panel to Review the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (joint with the Transportation Research Board)
Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
Duration: March 2016–September 2017
Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Richard Pain; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Stephen Godwin; project assistant: Michael Siri; summer intern: Andrew Yarger; off-site research associate: Jacob Spertus (Harvard)
Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting held February 16-17, 2017: fifth meeting TBD
 
 

National Science Foundation

 
Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fifth meeting scheduled for April 24-25, 2017; sixth meeting scheduled for July 6-7, 2017; both in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on the Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys

Sponsor: National Science Foundation

Duration: March 2015–June 2017

Study director: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Eileen LeFurgy

Chair: Barbara Entwisle (University of North Carolina)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they may also stand up workshops or consensus panels. A website is maintained for the committee.

Upcoming meetings: Fourth and last in-person meeting held December 1-2, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: Planning meeting held October 4, 2016 in Washington, DC; workshop scheduled for June 21-22, 2017


The Atlantic Philanthropies, the Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the U.S.
Department of Education, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the W.T. Grant Foundation

Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity
Sponsors: See above list
Duration: December 2016–December 2018
Study director: Judith Koenig; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistants: Kelly Arrington (beginning April 2017) and Agnes Gaskin (January–April 2017)
Co-chairs: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley); Lorraine McDonnell (UC Santa Barbara)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: First meeting scheduled for April 20-21, 2017, in Washington, DC


The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Standing Committee on Creating the American Opportunity Study, First Phase

Sponsor: The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Duration: April 2015–March 2017

Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin

Chair: Michael Hout (NYU)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee facilitated a workshop, May 9, 2016, on research uses of the American Opportunity Study (AOS), which is being developed to measure intergenerational mobility by linking 1990 census records (after capturing the necessary information) with subsequent census records, American Community Survey records, and administrative records that become available. The result will be a facility for researchers to obtain extracts of linked files for analysis within the Federal Statistical Research Data Center network (formerly the Census Bureau RDC network). The First-Phase AOS is to address the challenges of capturing linking information for the 1990 census short-form and long-form records, to evaluate the likely quality of matches with other records, and to propose the next phase of work.  A “workshop in brief” proceedings of the May workshop was released July 19, 2016, and is available for download as a free PDF. Presentation slides from the May workshop are also available.

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting TBD  

 
 

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
 

Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration
Sponsor: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Duration: May 2013–October 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Francine Blau (Cornell University)
Publication: Final report, The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, cleared review and was released as a prepublication, September 21, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held September 11-12, 2015, in Washington, DC
 
 

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

  

Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods
Sponsor: The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Duration: April 2015–December 2017
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; research assistant: George Schoeffel; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Robert Groves (Georgetown University)
Publication planned: Two reports; first report, Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Information While Protecting Privacy, was released in prepublication format, January 12, 2017 (see “Publication News” above); second report is being drafted; a website is maintained for the panel.  
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held for March 16-17, 2017, in Washington, DC
 


 

Nominations Sought for Julius Shiskin Award


Nominations are invited for the 2017 Julius Shiskin Memorial Award for Economic Statistics. This annual award, sponsored by the Washington Statistical Society, the National Association for Business Economics, and the Business and Economics Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association, is given in recognition of unusually original and important contributions in the development of economic statistics or in the use of statistics in interpreting the economy. Contributions can be in development of new statistical measures, statistical research, use of economic statistics to analyze and interpret economic activity, development of statistical tools, management of statistical programs, or application of data production techniques.

The 2016 award recipient was John Abowd, Edmund Ezra Day Professor at Cornell University and currently Associate Director for Research and Methodology and Chief Scientist at the Census Bureau, for designing and implementing disclosure avoidance techniques that enable federal statistical agencies to greatly expand the availability of their data while preserving respondents’ confidentiality and for his leadership at Cornell providing access to these data over the Internet.

This award was established in 1979 to honor Julius Shiskin who at the time of his death in 1978 was Commissioner of BLS. He earlier had served as Chief Statistician at the Office of Management and Budget and as Assistant Director at the U.S. Census Bureau. At Census he was instrumental in developing an electronic computer method for seasonal adjustment. At OMB he developed the policies that still govern the release of key economic indicators. At BLS he directed the comprehensive revision of the CPI, which included a new CPI for all urban consumers.

Nominations for the 2017 award are now being accepted. Individuals in the public or private sector from any country can be nominated. Completed nominations must be received by March 21, 2017. The award will be presented with an honorarium of $1000. A nomination form and a list of previous recipients are available from http://community.amstat.org/businessandeconomicstatisticssection/new-item/new-item.

For more information, please contact Thomas Evans, Julius Shiskin Award Committee Secretary, via e-mail at evans.thomas@bls.gov or call (202) 691-6354.
 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News 2016
CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 



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