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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

 

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 — December 20, 2016 — 

 

 People News

 

We were saddened to learn of the death of Linda Bilheimer, assistant director for health, retirement, and long-term analysis in the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), on November 11, 2016, at age 71 in Silver Spring, MD.  Before returning to CBO in 2011, she served as associate director for analysis and epidemiology at the National Center for Health Statistics; senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; deputy assistant director for health at CBO; senior researcher at Mathematica Policy Research Inc.; and director of health statistics and epidemiology in the Arkansas Department of Health, where she also served on the faculty of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.  She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University and her B.A. in economics and economic statistics from the University of York in the United Kingdom.

 

We mourn the death of Stephen E. Fienberg, university professor of statistics and social science at Carnegie Mellon University, member of the National Academy of Sciences, former member of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education Advisory Committee, former chair of CNSTAT, and principal investigator for the Carnegie Mellon node of the NSF-Census Research Network. Steve died on December 14, 2016, at age 74 in Pittsburgh, PA. An obituary on the Carnegie Mellon News web site that details his many accomplishments is available here.

Steve cared deeply about the health of federal statistics and the federal statistical system throughout his entire career.  He played a key role in the development of CNSTAT and led and contributed to many CNSTAT studies. He also cared deeply about standards of evidence and, as co-chair for many years of the National Academies’ Report Review Committee, worked hard to ensure the quality of National Academies’ reports, often enlisting CNSTAT members and staff in this effort.

Steve began his long-standing involvement with CNSTAT when he became its third chair in 1981, serving as chair from 1981-1984 and 1985-1987. He chaired or served on 10 CNSTAT studies, plus half a dozen studies in other areas of the Academies. For CNSTAT, he chaired the Subcommittee on Data Sharing (1981-1984), which produced the path-breaking Sharing Research Data; co-chaired the Panel on Statistical Assessments as Evidence in the Courts (1982-1987, joint with the Committee on Law and Justice); served ex officio on the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology (1985-1986); chaired the Panel to Review Evaluation Studies of Bilingual Education (1991); served on the Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond; chaired the Panel to Review the Scientific Evidence on the Polygraph (2001-2003, joint with the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences); served on the Panel on Methods for Assessing Discrimination (2001-2004); was vice chair of the Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention and Other National Goals (2005-2009, joint with the Committee on Law and Justice and Computer Science and Telecommunications Board); and served on the Panel on Survey Options for Estimating the Illegal Alien Flow at the Southwest Border (2011-2013).  At his death he was a member of the Standing Committee for the American Opportunity Study, Phase 1 (2015-2016). 

According to CNSTAT chair Larry Brown (University of Pennsylvania), “Steve was a literally tireless champion for precise and principled use of statistics and statistical analysis in all areas of science and modern life. Among all in our profession he had the broadest appreciation of the range of valid contemporary uses of statistics in applications. His view of the central importance of discerning statistical activity was evident in all of his professional life, and was in particular of seminal importance in the activities of CNSTAT over the past decades.” Speaking personally, I (Connie Citro) owe my having had the opportunity to join the CNSTAT staff to a meeting over dinner in late 1983, when Steve looked me over and decided I could do the job as study director for the panel that produced The Bicentennial Census: New Directions for Methodology in 1990.  CNSTAT and federal statistics owe much to Steve Fienberg. We will miss him greatly.

 

We congratulate John Eltinge on his new position as assistant director for research and methodology at the U.S. Census Bureau, effective December 12, 2016. John will be working with associate director (and former CNSTAT member) John Abowd. He will also assume the chair of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology, taking over from Jonaki Bose of the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality at SAMHSA, who has been chair since May 2015. John Eltinge was previously associate commissioner for the Office of Survey Methods Research at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a position he had held since January 2004. From June 1999 to January 2004, he served as the senior mathematical statistician in the BLS Office of Survey Methods Research. Before joining BLS, John was an associate professor in the Department of Statistics at Texas A&M University, specializing in sample design, survey nonresponse, measurement error, small domain estimation, quantile estimation, and time series analysis. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an associate editor for Survey Methodology and Journal of Official Statistics, and a former associate editor for Journal of the American Statistical Association and The American Statistician. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University, an M.S. in statistics from Purdue University, and a B.S. in mathematics from Vanderbilt University.

 

We congratulate Lawrence Bobo, W.E.B. Du Bois professor of the social sciences at Harvard University, and Timothy Smeeding, Lee Rainwater distinguished professor of public affairs and economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, on their election as fellows of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Larry, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, served on the CNSTAT panel that produced Measuring Poverty: A New Approach and the panel that produced Measuring Racial Discrimination. Tim served on the CNSTAT Panel on Retirement Income Modeling and is currently serving on the Standing Committee for the American Opportunity Study, Phase 1.

 

We thank the following distinguished public servants, who will be retiring at the end of 2016, for their many years of hard and dedicated work in the service of federal statistics:

·        William G. Bostic, Jr., senior advisor to the deputy director, U.S. Census Bureau—Bill joined the Census Bureau in 1976 and from August 2010 to October 2016 was the associate director for economic programs, responsible for more than 100 monthly, quarterly, and annual surveys covering various sectors of the economy, including 13 economic indicators and an economic census and census of governments every 5 years in years ending in 2 and 7.

·        Paul Bugg, economist with the Statistical and Science Policy (SSP) staff in OMB—Paul worked as an economist in the Department of the Interior from 1976 to 1984, when he joined SSP. He is the desk officer for the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the economic and decennial censuses and the SSP lead for many of its standards and initiatives, including those related to the principal federal economic indicators, dissemination of statistical products and electronic dissemination; the “Strengthening Federal Statistics” chapter of the Analytical Perspectives volume of the President’s Budget; the North American Industry Classification System; the North American Product Classification System; the Standard Occupational Classification; the definition of poverty; and cybersecurity and statistical confidentiality protection. 

·        Brent Moulton, associate director for national economic accounts, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA)— Prior to joining BEA in 1997, Brent served as chief of the Price and Index Number Research Division at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). He received the 2015 Julius Shiskin Memorial Award for Economic Statistics in recognition of “his leadership in implementing major innovations into the U.S. national accounts, international standards for national accounts, and expanded integration of U.S. statistical programs. He also is recognized for his work at [BLS] . . . in developing innovations that improved the reliability of the Consumer Price Index (CPI).”

·        James Scanlon, deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation (ASPE), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)—Jim served 48 years in the federal government, including with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, the U.S. Public Health Service Office of Planning and Evaluation and Office of Health Research, Statistics and Technology, and the National Center for Health Statistics, before coming to ASPE. At ASPE, among other responsibilities, he served as chair of the HHS Data Council, which celebrated its 20th anniversary this fall, and as executive director of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics.

 

 Report News

 

Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop, released in prepublication format, December 16, 2016, summarizes the presentations and discussions at a workshop held in March 2016 for the Office of Minority Health and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In the U.S. criminal justice system in 2014, an estimated 2.2 million people were incarcerated or under correctional supervision on any given day, and another 4.7 million were under community supervision, such as probation or parole. Among all U.S. adults, 1 in 31 is involved with the criminal justice system, many of them having had recurring encounters. The ability to measure the effects of criminal justice involvement and incarceration on health and health disparities has been a challenge, due largely to limited and inconsistent measures and lack of data. The presence of a myriad of confounding factors, such as socioeconomic status and childhood disadvantage, also makes it hard to isolate and identify a causal relationship between criminal justice involvement and health. The Bureau of Justice Statistics collects periodic health data on the people who are incarcerated at any given time, but few national-level surveys have captured criminal justice system involvement for people previously involved in the system or those under community supervision—nor have they collected systematic data on the effects that go beyond the incarcerated individuals themselves. Participants in the March 2016 workshop investigated the feasibility of collecting criminal justice experience data in national household-based health surveys. The workshop proceedings, prepared by Jordyn White and Esha Sinha, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly. 


Evaluation of Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress
, released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016, is the final report of the Committee on the Evaluation of NAEP Mathematics and Reading Levels, chaired by Christopher Edley, Jr. (UC Berkeley), and sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics. The report, edited by Christopher Edley, Jr., and Judith Koenig, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

        Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has been providing policymakers, educators, and the public with reports on academic performance and progress of the nation’s students. The assessment is given periodically in a variety of subjects: mathematics, reading, writing, science, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and technology and engineering literacy. NAEP is given to representative samples of students across the United States to assess the educational progress of the nation as a whole. Since 1992, NAEP results have been reported in relation to three achievement levels: basic, proficient, and advanced. However, the use of achievement levels has provoked controversy and disagreement, and evaluators have identified numerous concerns. This publication evaluates the NAEP student achievement levels in reading and mathematics in grades 4, 8, and 12 to determine whether the achievement levels are reasonable, reliable, valid, and informative to the public, and recommends ways that the setting and use of achievement levels can be improved.


The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, released in prepublication format, September 21, 2016, is the final report of the Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, chaired by Francine Blau (Cornell University) and sponsored by the John T. and Catherine D. MacArthur Foundation and the Independent Funds of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report, edited by Francine Blau and Christopher Mackie, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly. 
        More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, the first generation (foreign-born) and second generation (children of the foreign-born) comprise almost one in four Americans. It comes as little surprise, then, that many U.S. residents view immigration as a major policy issue facing the nation. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts with nearly every policy area of concern, from jobs and the economy, education, and health care, to federal, state, and local government budgets. The changing patterns of immigration and the evolving consequences for American society, institutions, and the economy continue to fuel public policy debate that plays out at the national, state, and local levels. The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration assesses the impact of dynamic immigration processes on economic and fiscal outcomes for the United States.

Advancing Concepts and Models for Measuring Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop, released in prepublication format, September 16, 2016, summarizes the presentations and discussion from a workshop held in May 2016 for the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, organized by a steering committee chaired by Scott Stern (MIT). Because of the role of innovation as a driver of economic productivity and growth and as a mechanism for improving people's well-being in other ways, understanding the nature, determinants, and impacts of innovation has become increasingly important to policy makers. To be effective, investment in innovation requires this understanding, which, in turn, requires measurement of the underlying inputs and subsequent outcomes of innovation processes. The workshop brought together academic researchers, private and public sector experts, and representatives from public policy agencies to develop strategies for broadening and modernizing innovation information systems. The workshop proceedings, prepared by Christopher Mackie, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

 REPORTS RELEASED IN 2016 NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINTED FORM (& as free PDFs)

Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop (first released as a prepublication, September 19, 2016)

Measuring Recovery from Substance Use or Mental Disorders: Workshop Summary
 (first released as a prepublication, August 12, 2016)

 

Using Linked Census, Survey, and Administrative Data to Assess Longer-Term Effects of Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief  (released July 19, 2016)


Measuring Trauma: Workshop Summary (first released as a prepublication, June 3, 2016)

 

Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime (first released as a prepublication, May 16, 2016)

 

Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs (first released as a prepublication, March 10, 2016)

 

Measuring Specific Mental Illness Diagnoses with Functional Impairment (first released as a prepublication, February 12, 2016)


Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT public seminars and symposia page. Presentations from the October 2016 CNSTAT meeting public seminar, "Taking Surveys to People's Technology: Implications for Federal Statistics and Social Science Research," are available here.

Slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. This page also includes a section on “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.

  

 
Event Other News

Abstract submissions are open through December 30, 2016, for the 2017 Federal Computer Assisted Survey Information Collection (FedCASIC) Workshops. The meetings will be held April 11-12, 2017, at U.S. Census Bureau headquarters in Suitland, MD, and cover topics related to the use of technology in government surveys. John Abowd, associate director for research and methodology at the Census Bureau, is the keynote speaker. General registration and participation submission information are available here.
 

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 

 

CNSTAT’s 132nd meeting will be held February 9-10, 2017, at the National Academies Keck Center in Washington, DC. It will be in retreat format; it will not have a public seminar or agency head luncheon.

CNSTAT’s 133rd meeting will be held May 11-12, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 12th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm. We expect the seminar to be on a topic of interest to Katherine Wallman, chief statistician of the United States, and to include well-chosen and well-merited remarks in her honor.

CNSTAT’s 134th meeting will be held October 19-20, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 20th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

   

 

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[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Panel on Methods for Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Improve Crop Estimates
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2014–September 2017
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Mary Ellen Bock (Purdue University)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fourth in-person meeting scheduled for January 26-27, 2017, in Washington, DC

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Second meeting scheduled for February 10-11, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty [on hold]
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD


Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Publication: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth meeting scheduled for February 2-3, 2017, in Washington, DC

Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2013–November 2016
Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin; research assistant: Adrienne Bradford
Chair: John Czajka (Mathematica Policy Research)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and last meeting held October 10-11, 2016, in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: Eighth meeting scheduled for January 23-25, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2015–November 2016
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Co-chairs: Linda Gage (California Department of Finance, retired) and Joseph Salvo (NYC Department of City Planning)
Publication planned: Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop was released in prepublication format, September 19, 2016 and is now available in print (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held March 8-9, 2016, in Washington, DC


Department of Education
  

Committee on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Achievement Levels Evaluation (joint with the Board on Testing and Assessment, which has the lead)
Sponsor: National Center for Education Statistics
Duration: September 2014–July 2016
Study director: Judith Koenig (BOTA); program officer: Jordyn White (CNSTAT); project assistant: Kelly Arrington (BOTA)
Chair: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley)
Publication planned: Final report, Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, cleared review and was released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Eighth and last meeting (closed) held November 16-17, 2015, in Irvine, CA


Department of Health and Human Services
 
Workshop on Improving Data on Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Collections
Sponsor: Office of Minority Health
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Wendy Manning (Bowling Green University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings released in prepublication format December 16, 2016 (see "Publication News" above)
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held March 29-30, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation
Sponsors: Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services); U.S. Department of Labor; Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education); and U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: Grover (Russ) Whitehurst, Brookings Institution
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held October 27, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Research Agenda for Longitudinal Studies
Sponsor: National Institute on Aging, Division of Behavioral and Social Research
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: James Jackson (University of Michigan and Russell Sage Foundation)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief
Upcoming meetings: Workshop scheduled for June 5-6, 2017 in Washington, DC

                

Department of Justice
 

Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Publications planned: First report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, was released in prepublication format, May 16, 2016; printed copies and free PDFs are available; second report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Final in-person meeting scheduled for January 13-14 2017, in Coral Gables, FL

 


Department of Transportation

Panel to Review the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (joint with the Transportation Research Board)
Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
Duration: March 2016–September 2017
Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Richard Pain; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Stephen Godwin; project assistant: Michael Siri; summer intern: Andrew Yarger; off-site research associate: Jacob Spertus (Harvard)
Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting to be held in February 2017, date TBD

 
National Science Foundation
 
Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting scheduled for January 26-27, 2017; fifth meeting scheduled for April 24-25, 2017; sixth meeting scheduled for July 6-7, 2017; all in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on the Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys

Sponsor: National Science Foundation

Duration: March 2015–June 2017

Study director: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Eileen LeFurgy

Chair: Barbara Entwisle (University of North Carolina)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they may also stand up workshops or consensus panels. A website is maintained for the committee.

Upcoming meetings: Fourth and last in-person meeting held December 1-2, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Prioritizing and Implementing Improvements to Innovation Indicators
Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Scott Stern (MIT)
Publication: Advancing Concepts and Models for Measuring Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop was released in prepublication format, September 16, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held May 19-20, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: Planning meeting held October 4, 2016 in Washington, DC; workshop being scheduled
 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Standing Committee on Creating the American Opportunity Study, First Phase

Sponsor: The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Duration: April 2015–March 2017

Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin

Chair: Michael Hout (NYU)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee facilitated a workshop, May 9, 2016, on research uses of the American Opportunity Study (AOS), which is being developed to measure intergenerational mobility by linking 1990 census records (after capturing the necessary information) with subsequent census records, American Community Survey records, and administrative records that become available. The result will be a facility for researchers to obtain extracts of linked files for analysis within the Federal Statistical Research Data Center network (formerly the Census Bureau RDC network). The First-Phase AOS is to address the challenges of capturing linking information for the 1990 census short-form and long-form records, to evaluate the likely quality of matches with other records, and to propose the next phase of work.  A “workshop in brief” proceedings of the May workshop was released July 19, 2016, and is available for download as a free PDF. Presentation slides from the May workshop are also available.

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting TBD 

 

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration
Sponsor: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Duration: May 2013–October 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Francine Blau (Cornell University)
Publication: Final report, The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, cleared review and was released as a prepublication, September 21, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held September 11-12, 2015, in Washington, DC


The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

  

Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods
Sponsor: The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Duration: April 2015–December 2017
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; research assistant: George Schoeffel; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Robert Groves (Georgetown University)
Publication planned: Two reports; first report is in response to review; a website is maintained for the panel.  
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting scheduled for March 16-17, 2017, in Washington, DC

 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News November 2016
CNSTAT News October 2016

CNSTAT News September 2016
CNSTAT News August 2016
CNSTAT News June 2016
CNSTAT News May 2016
CNSTAT News March 2016
CNSTAT News February 2016

CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 



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