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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

 

New CNSTAT Logo
 

 — November 22, 2016 — 

 

 People News

 

We note with sorrow the death of Ralph J. Cicerone, who died at age 73 in Short Hills, NJ. Dr. Cicerone was president of the National Academy of Sciences and chair of the National Research Council from 2005 to June 2016. During his presidency, the National Academies renovated its historic headquarters on the National Mall in Washington and established a $500 million Gulf Research Program after the disastrous Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. He also came to know and appreciate the work of CNSTAT and helped secure funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York for the American Opportunity Study (AOS).
        Dr. Cicerone was born in New Castle, PA, the grandson of Italian immigrants. The first in his family to attend college, he was inspired by the space race with the Soviet Union to pursue an engineering career. He graduated with a B.S. degree in electrical engineering in 1965 from MIT and earned his master’s and doctorate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was an atmospheric chemist on the faculty of the University of Michigan from 1971 to 1978. After conducting research at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, part of the University of California, San Diego, he was named senior scientist and director of the atmospheric chemistry division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO. He became a professor at the University of California, Irvine, in 1989. There he founded the Earth System Science Department, served as dean of physical sciences, and was chancellor from 1998 to 2005.
        As a scientist, he was best known for issuing an early warning about the risks of climate change, and his tenure as president saw the National Academies issue reports that advocated reducing greenhouse gas emissions while identifying strategies for adapting to a changing climate. In 2001 he headed an NAS panel, commissioned by President George W. Bush, which concluded unequivocally that human activities were causing the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere, causing surface air and subsurface ocean temperatures to rise. The panel’s conclusion was based in part on research reported in 1974 by Dr. Cicerone and two colleagues from the University of Michigan. They were among the first to warn that the atmosphere’s ozone layer, which protects the planet from potentially lethal ultraviolet radiation, was being dissipated by chlorine gases. He will be very much missed by the scientific community and the National Academies.

We honor Robert M. Hauser, who retired after 6 years of service as executive director of the National Academies’ Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE, the unit that houses CNSTAT) on November 11, 2016, and wish him all the best in his future endeavors. Bob is Vilas research professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he directed the Center for Demography and Ecology and the Institute for Research on Poverty. He worked on the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study from 1969 to just a few years ago. His research interests include trends in educational progression and social mobility in the United States among racial and ethnic groups, the uses of educational assessment as a policy tool, the effects of families on social and economic inequality, and changes in socioeconomic standing, health, and well-being across the life course. He has contributed to statistical methods for discrete multivariate analysis and structural equation models and to methods for the measurement of social and economic standing. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Statistical Association. At the National Academies, he served on the Committee on National Statistics, the DBASSE Advisory Committee, the Board on Testing and Assessment, and numerous study panels. For CNSTAT he served on panels that produced the reports The Future of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (1993), Measuring Poverty—A New Approach (1995), Protecting Participants and Facilitating Social and Behavioral Sciences Research (2003), The 2000 Census—Counting Under Adversity (2004), and Conducting Biosocial Surveys: Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biospecimens, and Biodata (2010). He has a B.A. in economics from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan.


We congratulate Alicia Carriquiry, distinguished professor, Department of Statistics, Iowa State University, on her election as a member of the National Academy of Medicine, October 17, 2016. She was appointed at the same time as a member of the National Academies’ Report Review Committee, which ensures an independent review process for all Academies’ reports. She served on CNSTAT from 2008–2014 and has chaired or served as a member of many study panels throughout the National Academies. Her research interests are in Bayesian statistics and general methods. Her recent work focuses on nutrition and dietary assessment, as well as on problems in genomics, forensic sciences, and traffic safety. She is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has served on the executive committee of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, and the American Statistical Association and was a member of the board of trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. She holds an M.Sc. in animal science from the University of Illinois, an M.Sc. in statistics, and a Ph.D. in statistics and animal genetics from Iowa State University.

We congratulate Ron Jarmin on his new position as associate director for economic programs at the U.S. Census Bureau, effective October 2, 2016. He replaces Bill Bostic, who is remaining at the Census Bureau as senior advisor to the deputy director until his retirement in early 2017. Ron brings a wealth of experience to the Economic Directorate, which includes the quinquennial Economic Census and a host of annual, quarterly, and monthly business surveys in its portfolio. For the past six years, he served as assistant director for research and methodology. In that role, he led efforts to transform and modernize economic measurement, collaborating with partners from across the federal statistical system, academia, and the private sector. He worked especially closely with the Economic Directorate and the Bureau of Economic Analysis to identify new data and methods to reduce respondent burden and ensure that the Census Bureau served data users’ needs. He found innovative ways to tackle declining response rates and to use administrative records and non-survey data to provide the granular economic data business and community leaders want. Before that, Ron was the Census Bureau’s chief economist, chief of the Center for Economic Studies, and a research economist in the Center. Ron has a B.A. in economics from Central Washington University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oregon.

We congratulate Alan Krueger, Bendheim professor of economics and public policy and director, Survey Research Center, Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, Princeton University, on being named the winner of the 2017 Daniel Patrick Moynihan Prize by the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He will formally accept the prize on Capitol Hill on May 18, 2017, when he will give a lecture on the economics of alternative work arrangements and what public policy-makers can do to support that significant and growing section of the workforce. Alan has held several government positions, including chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor during the Clinton Administration and assistant secretary for economic policy and chief economist of the U.S. Department of the Treasury and chair of the Council of Economic Advisers under the Obama Administration. He is a Sloan Fellow in Economics, an NBER Olin Fellow, and a fellow of the Econometric Society, the Society of Labor Economists, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He was awarded the IZA Prize in Labor Economics with David Card in 2006. He received his B.S. degree from Cornell University and his M.A. and Ph.D., both in economics, from Harvard University. He has published widely on the economics of education, terrorism, unemployment, labor demand, income distribution, social insurance, labor market regulation and environmental economics. From 2000 to 2006 he was a regular contributor to the "Economic Scene" column in the New York Times. He served on the CNSTAT panel that produced Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States (2005).

We congratulate Mary Ellen O’Connell on her appointment as executive director of the National Academies’ Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, effective November 14, 2016. She succeeds Bob Hauser in the post, her selection coming after an extensive national search. She brings to her new role 15 years of experience at the National Academies, including as deputy executive director of DBASSE since 2012, providing valuable leadership in program management and in program and policy development. She also served as acting director of the Board on Environmental Change and Society, deputy director of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences and the Board on Human-Systems Integration, and senior program officer with the Board on Children, Youth and Families. She has led studies on a wide range of topics including an evaluation of disability and rehabilitation program outcomes; home healthcare; prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders; ethical considerations for research; and an evaluation of international education programs. Prior to joining the National Academies, Mary Ellen developed and led a variety of policy and program initiatives at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare. She received a B.A. from Cornell University and an M.S. in the management of human services from the Heller Graduate School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University.


We congratulate the following members of the CNSTAT community on their election in October 2016 as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in recognition of their contributions to innovation, education, and scientific leadership (note that AAAS has been electing fellows each year since 1874):

  • Alicia Carriquiry, Distinguished professor, Department of Statistics, Iowa State University
  • Kaye Husbands Fealing, Chair, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology  
  • John S. Gardenier, National Center for Health Statistics (retired)
  • Stanley Presser, Distinguished university professor, and professor, Sociology Department and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Francisco Samaniego, Distinguished research professor, Department of Statistics, University of California, Davis
  • Hal Stern, Ted and Janice Smith Family Foundation dean and professor of statistics, Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences, University of California, Irvine


We congratulate CNSTAT senior program officers Daniel Cork and Christopher Mackie on receiving DBASSE staff awards in October 2016:

  • Dan, who joined CNSTAT in 2000, was nominated for “impact”—in particular the direction of two projects over the past 7 years (preceded by several related projects) to inform the Census Bureau’s ongoing work to reduce per-household census cost while maintaining quality. The first of these projects was a consensus panel, which comprehensively observed the methods and conduct of the 2010 census as it happened. The panel’s report, Change and the 2020 Census: Not Whether but How (2011), recommended that the Census Bureau focus its efforts on four priority objectives in the redesign for 2020 and laid out a path to follow; those four priority areas were adopted by the Census Bureau as the core of its reengineered 2020 census design. The panel’s experience suggested that—as the Census Bureau moved forward on unfamiliar terrain in overhauling census procedures—the Bureau would benefit from a source of trustworthy but informal technical feedback on ideas before they became set in stone. This was accomplished through the Standing Committee on Census Reengineering, formed in 2014. Dan continued as the study director for the committee and was able to recruit nearly all of the previous panel members (plus some new members) to join this effort. Standing committee members have since worked with Census staff to build and strengthen elements of the redesign and to design informative pretests as proofs of concept.
  • Chris, who joined CNSTAT in 1998, was nominated for “sustained achievement”. He was study director for the massive and well-received report on The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, released in September, the latest oeuvre in a career of path-breaking reports on economic measurement, including: At What Price? Conceptualizing and Measuring Cost-of-Living and Price Indexes (2002), which was influential in assisting the Bureau of Labor Statistics to make judicious improvements to the CPI and deemed the “best business book of the year” by the New York Times business editor; Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States (2005), which examined measurement of home production, human capital investment, and other nonmarket goods and services; Accounting for Health Care and Health Care: Approaches to Measuring the Sources and Costs of Their Improvement (2010), which addressed the need to measure health as an outcome of various inputs, just one of which is health care; Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education (2012), which provided practical advice about measuring productivity in state universities and colleges—a difficult topic because academics notoriously resist measuring their own productivity; Subjective Well Being: Measuring Happiness, Suffering, and Other Dimensions of Experience (2013), which evaluated methods for assessing how people feel about their well-being and identified areas for systematic data gathering by the federal statistical system to inform policy (e.g., reducing commuting time would make a major improvement in well-being!); and Civic Engagement and Social Cohesion: Measuring Dimensions of Social Capital to Inform Policy (2014), which tackled another important but difficult area of social measurement.
     

 

 Report News

 

Evaluation of Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016, is the final report of the Committee on the Evaluation of NAEP Mathematics and Reading Levels, chaired by Christopher Edley, Jr. (UC Berkeley), and sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics. The report, edited by Christopher Edley, Jr., and Judith Koenig, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

        Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has been providing policymakers, educators, and the public with reports on academic performance and progress of the nation’s students. The assessment is given periodically in a variety of subjects: mathematics, reading, writing, science, the arts, civics, economics, geography, U.S. history, and technology and engineering literacy. NAEP is given to representative samples of students across the United States to assess the educational progress of the nation as a whole. Since 1992, NAEP results have been reported in relation to three achievement levels: basic, proficient, and advanced. However, the use of achievement levels has provoked controversy and disagreement, and evaluators have identified numerous concerns. This publication evaluates the NAEP student achievement levels in reading and mathematics in grades 4, 8, and 12 to determine whether the achievement levels are reasonable, reliable, valid, and informative to the public, and recommends ways that the setting and use of achievement levels can be improved.


The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, released in prepublication format, September 21, 2016, is the final report of the Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, chaired by Francine Blau (Cornell University) and sponsored by the John T. and Catherine D. MacArthur Foundation and the Independent Funds of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report, edited by Francine Blau and Christopher Mackie, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly. 
        More than 40 million people living in the United States were born in other countries, and almost an equal number have at least one foreign-born parent. Together, the first generation (foreign-born) and second generation (children of the foreign-born) comprise almost one in four Americans. It comes as little surprise, then, that many U.S. residents view immigration as a major policy issue facing the nation. Not only does immigration affect the environment in which everyone lives, learns, and works, but it also interacts with nearly every policy area of concern, from jobs and the economy, education, and health care, to federal, state, and local government budgets. The changing patterns of immigration and the evolving consequences for American society, institutions, and the economy continue to fuel public policy debate that plays out at the national, state, and local levels. The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration assesses the impact of dynamic immigration processes on economic and fiscal outcomes for the United States.

Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop, released in prepublication format, September 19, 2016, summarizes the presentations and discussion from a workshop held in March 2016, sponsored by the U.S. Census Bureau and organized by a steering committee chaired by Linda Gage (California Department of Finance, retired) and Joseph Salvo (NYC Department of City Planning). Although people in the United States have historically been reasonably supportive of federal censuses and surveys, they are increasingly unavailable or not willing to respond to interview requests from federal—as well as private—sources. Moreover, even when people agree to respond to a survey, they increasingly decline to complete all questions. The workshop considered approaches to reducing respondent burden in the ACS, such as building respondent support through effective communication, using administrative records to substitute for questions, using improved sampling, and tailoring data collection for people in group quarters. The workshop proceedings, prepared by Thomas Plewes, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

Advancing Concepts and Models for Measuring Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop, released in prepublication format, September 16, 2016, summarizes the presentations and discussion from a workshop held in May 2016 for the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, organized by a steering committee chaired by Scott Stern (MIT). Because of the role of innovation as a driver of economic productivity and growth and as a mechanism for improving people's well-being in other ways, understanding the nature, determinants, and impacts of innovation has become increasingly important to policy makers. To be effective, investment in innovation requires this understanding, which, in turn, requires measurement of the underlying inputs and subsequent outcomes of innovation processes. The workshop brought together academic researchers, private and public sector experts, and representatives from public policy agencies to develop strategies for broadening and modernizing innovation information systems. The workshop proceedings, prepared by Christopher Mackie, is available as a free PDF and will be in print shortly.

 REPORTS RELEASED IN 2016 NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINTED FORM (& as free PDFs)

Measuring Recovery from Substance Use or Mental Disorders: Workshop Summary (first released as a prepublication, August 12, 2016)

 

Using Linked Census, Survey, and Administrative Data to Assess Longer-Term Effects of Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief  (released July 19, 2016)


Measuring Trauma: Workshop Summary (first released as a prepublication, June 3, 2016)

 

Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime (first released as a prepublication, May 16, 2016)

 

Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Fatigue, Long-Term Health, and Highway Safety: Research Needs (first released as a prepublication, March 10, 2016)

 

Measuring Specific Mental Illness Diagnoses with Functional Impairment (first released as a prepublication, February 12, 2016)


Reminder: PDF versions of CNSTAT and NAS reports are available for free download at The National Academies Press website, http://www.nap.edu, NOTE: The download site asks for your e-mail and a password.  If you don’t have an NAP account and don’t want to have one, then provide your e-mail and click “I don’t have an account;” on the next page click “accept NAP policies” and “log in as guest”.  

Reminder: Slides from previous CNSTAT public seminars are available on the CNSTAT public seminars and symposia page. Presentations from the October 2016 CNSTAT meeting public seminar, "Taking Surveys to People's Technology: Implications for Federal Statistics and Social Science Research," are available here.

Slides from several major workshops are available on the presentations page on the CNSTAT website. This page also includes a section on “Multiple Data Sources Presentations,” which links to presentations from workshops and meetings for CNSTAT’s Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods.

  

 
Event Other News

We take this opportunity to thank the many agencies that contribute core support each year to the Committee on National Statistics. Core funds enable CNSTAT to maintain a small executive staff who, among other things, organize the CNSTAT meetings, prepare the newsletter, are active in the Washington statistical community, develop new projects of interest to the entire statistical system, and every 4 years prepare a new edition of CNSTAT’s flagship publication, Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency, now in its 5th edition (2013) and scheduled to be released in a 6th edition in early 2017. Agencies contributing core support during fiscal 2016 include:

  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
  • Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, DHHS
  • Bureau of Economic Analysis
  • Bureau of Justice Statistics
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Bureau of Transportation Statistics
  • Economic Research Service, USDA
  • Energy Information Administration
  • Food and Nutrition Service, USDA
  • Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics Program, NSF
  • National Agricultural Statistics Service
  • National Center for Education Statistics
  • National Center for Health Statistics
  • National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
  • National Institute on Aging
  • Office of Policy Development and Research, HUD
  • Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics, Social Security Administration
  • Research Evaluation Division, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Sociology Program NSF
  • Statistics of Income Division, IRS
  • U.S. Census Bureau


We call your attention to the 26th Annual Morris Hansen Lecture, “Hard-to-Survey Populations and the U.S. Decennial Census,” to be held Tuesday, November 29, 2016, 3:30 – 5:30 pm, Jefferson Auditorium, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Independence Avenue (between 12th and 14th Streets SW). The speaker is Nancy Bates, senior researcher for survey methodology, U.S. Census Bureau. Discussants are Brad Edwards, vice president, Westat, Rockville, MD, and Linda Jacobsen, vice president, U.S. Programs, Population Reference Bureau, Washington, DC. To register, visit this site. (Note: registration closes on November 23 at 5:00 pm.)

Abstract: This presentation will profile historically hard-to-survey populations in the U.S. Decennial Census. The talk will emphasize methods for locating these populations and the emergence of social marketing campaigns as a means to encourage participation. Drawing upon experience from the 1990, 2000, and 2010 censuses, I will discuss why a population may be hard to survey using the framework set forth by Tourangeau (2014), i.e., hard to identify, locate, persuade, or interview. The lecture will describe methods used in previous Censuses to define and locate hard-to-count segments of the population and describe techniques the agency has employed to overcome the challenges. The talk will include results from a recent test of a new response platform planned for the 2020 Census (digital advertising). The presentation will also discuss the Low Response Score (LRS), a new metric to identify Census tracts and block groups containing a high proportion of hard-to-survey households. The presentation will also demonstrate a prototype LRS mapping application designed to help field staff, Census managers, partnership specialists, local officials, and other community stakeholders locate, map, and more easily describe hard-to-survey areas under their jurisdiction.  
 

We call your attention to the Washington Statistical Society/Government Statistics Section/Social Statistics Section (of the ASA) seminar, 2016 Herriot Award Presentation on Supplemental Poverty Measures, to be held December 5, 2016, from 10:00-11:30 am, at the Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, Room 1.

The 2016 recipients of the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics, Kathleen S. Short and Thesia I. Garner, have been recognized for their important and extensive work in developing and refining alternative measures of poverty used to better understand the nature and scope of poverty in America that has now resulted in the annual release of the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). The presentation will begin with Connie Citro (CNSTAT) discussing and recognizing the historical context and importance of Dr. Short’s and Dr. Garner’s work in the development of alternative poverty measures and the SPM within the federal statistical system. Dr. Short (Census Bureau, retired) and Dr. Garner (BLS) will discuss their joint work over the past 20 years to define and calculate improved poverty measurements leading to the annual release of the SPM jointly with the official U.S. poverty measure. Current ongoing work, especially on the setting of poverty thresholds, will also be discussed.

To be placed on the seminar attendance list at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, e-mail your name, affiliation, and seminar name to wss_seminar@bls.gov (underscore after ‘wss’) by noon at least 2 days in advance of the seminar or call 202-691-7524 and leave a message. Bring a photo ID to the seminar. BLS is located at 2 Massachusetts Avenue, NE. Use the Red Line to Union Station. For a video conferencing option, see the November 2016 WSS newsletter, at www.washstat.org.

CNSTAT’s sister Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics (CATS) is hosting two public events as follows:
 

Symposium and Webcast on Data-Driven City Planning and Policy, December 5, 2016, 2-5 pm, National Academy of Sciences Building, Lecture Room, 2101 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC—City and local governments must make complex policy and planning decisions while simultaneously facing pressure to become more economically efficient, environmentally friendly, and socially responsive. The abundance of data generated and collected by cities has tremendous potential to ground these decisions in empirical evidence; however, practical, institutional, and methodological challenges make widespread adoption of data-driven governance difficult. We invite you to join us for a panel discussion featuring innovative research and critical challenges in data driven policy and planning for cities. For more information, download the preliminary program. To register, visit the event page.
 

Webcast of Roundtable on Data Science Post-Secondary Education, December 14, 2016, 10-5 pm, National Academies’ Keck Center, Room 208, 500 5th St, NW, Washington, DC. We invite you to participate in a one-day webcast on data science post-secondary education. This meeting will bring together data scientists and educators to discuss how to define and strengthen existing data science programs and how to best engage and retain data science students. For more information, download the preliminary program. To register, visit the event website. (Note that in-person registration is limited.) 


It is not too late to register for the 2016 Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (FCSM) Statistical Policy Seminar, the thirteenth in a series of biennial conferences hosted by the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics (COPAFS). The statistical policy seminar alternates with the FCSM research seminar. The seminar will be held December 6-7, 2016, at the Washington Convention Center, Washington, DC. Here are links to the Program and Registration.
  

 

 CNSTAT Meetings

CNSTAT holds three regular meetings each year, with its spring and fall meeting dates following a set formula; our May meetings are always the Thursday–Friday preceding Mother’s Day and our October meetings are always the second-to-last Thursday–Friday of the month. Here are the next three meetings: 

 

CNSTAT’s 132nd meeting will be held February 9-10, 2017, at the National Academies Keck Center in Washington, DC. It will be in retreat format; it will not have a public seminar or agency head luncheon.

CNSTAT’s 133rd meeting will be held May 11-12, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 12th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm. We expect the seminar to be on a topic of interest to Katherine Wallman, chief statistician of the United States, and to include well-chosen and well-merited remarks in her honor.

CNSTAT’s 134th meeting will be held October 19-20, 2017, at the National Academy of Sciences Building at 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. On the 20th, the meeting will feature a luncheon with statistical agency heads (members of the ICSP), followed by a public seminar, beginning with light refreshments at 1:30 pm and ending with a reception at 4:30 pm.

   

 

 AP Header


[Listed by sponsor agency, beginning with federal departments. Unless otherwise noted, meetings are in Washington, DC, and include open sessions. For further information, contact the person listed as the study director or project assistant (e-mail addresses follow the formula of first initial plus last name as oneword@nas.edu). Also see the CNSTAT web site under “Our Work.”]

Department of Agriculture

  

Panel on Methods for Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Improve Crop Estimates
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2014–September 2017
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Mary Ellen Bock (Purdue University)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fourth in-person meeting scheduled for January 26-27, 2017, in Washington, DC

Panel on Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service
Duration: September 2015–September 2018
Study directors: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: Catherine Kling (Iowa State University)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Second meeting scheduled for February 10-11, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Model-Based Methods for Producing Estimates of Livestock with Appropriate Measures of Uncertainty [on hold]
Sponsor: National Agricultural Statistics Service
Duration: September 2015– September 2018
Study director: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: TBD


Department of Commerce
  

Panel to Reengineer the Census Bureau’s Annual Economic Surveys
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: May 2015–May 2018
Study director: Glenn White; senior program officer: Nancy Kirkendall; project assistant: Mary Ann Kasper
Chair: Katharine Abraham (University of Maryland)
Publication: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth meeting scheduled for February 2-3, 2017, in Washington, DC

Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2013–November 2016
Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin; research assistant: Adrienne Bradford
Chair: John Czajka (Mathematica Policy Research)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Fifth and last meeting held October 10-11, 2016, in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2014–September 2019
Study director: Daniel Cork; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; program officer: Jordyn White; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Thomas Cook (Decision Analytics International)
Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee has facilitated a consensus panel on reengineering the Census Bureau’s annual economic surveys (see above) and will spin off workshops on central topics for 2020 census planning. A website is maintained for the committee.
Upcoming meetings: Eighth meeting scheduled for January 23-25, 2017, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey
Sponsor: U.S. Census Bureau
Duration: September 2015–November 2016
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Co-chairs: Linda Gage (California Department of Finance, retired) and Joseph Salvo (NYC Department of City Planning)
Publication planned: Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop was released in prepublication format, September 19, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held March 8-9, 2016, in Washington, DC


Department of Education
  

Committee on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Achievement Levels Evaluation (joint with the Board on Testing and Assessment, which has the lead)
Sponsor: National Center for Education Statistics
Duration: September 2014–July 2016
Study director: Judith Koenig (BOTA); program officer: Jordyn White (CNSTAT); project assistant: Kelly Arrington (BOTA)
Chair: Christopher Edley, Jr. (University of California, Berkeley)
Publication planned: Final report, Evaluation of the Achievement Levels for Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, cleared review and was released in prepublication format, November 17, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Eighth and last meeting (closed) held November 16-17, 2015, in Irvine, CA


Department of Health and Human Services
 
Workshop on Improving Data on Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Collections
Sponsor: Office of Minority Health
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Wendy Manning (Bowling Green University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings has cleared review and is being prepared for release
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held March 29-30, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation
Sponsors: Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services); U.S. Department of Labor; Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education); and U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Jordyn White; senior program officer: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair: Grover (Russ) Whitehurst, Brookings Institution
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held October 27, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on a Research Agenda for Longitudinal Studies
Sponsor: National Institute on Aging, Division of Behavioral and Social Research
Duration: September 2016–September 2017
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: TBD
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings in brief
Upcoming meetings: TBD

                

Department of Justice
 

Panel on Modernizing the Nation’s Crime Statistics (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice)

Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Duration: September 2013–December 2016

Study director: Daniel Cork; project assistant: Michael Siri

Chair: Janet Lauritsen (University of Missouri–St. Louis)

Publications planned: First report, Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime, was released in prepublication format, May 16, 2016; printed copies and free PDFs are available; second report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Final in-person meeting scheduled for January 13-14 2017, in Coral Gables, FL

 


Department of Transportation

Panel to Review the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability Program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (joint with the Transportation Research Board)
Sponsor: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
Duration: March 2016–September 2017
Study director: Michael Cohen; senior program officer: Richard Pain; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; TRB Studies and Special Programs Division director: Stephen Godwin; project assistant: Michael Siri; summer intern: Andrew Yarger; off-site research associate: Jacob Spertus (Harvard)
Co-chairs: Joel Greenhouse (Carnegie Mellon) and Sharon-Lise Normand (Harvard Medical School)
Publication planned: Final report is being drafted
Upcoming meetings: Third meeting scheduled for December 15-16, 2016, in Washington, DC

 
National Science Foundation
 
Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce

Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–March 2018
Study director: Krisztina Marton; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Co-chair-designates: Rita Colwell (University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University) and James House (University of Michigan)
Publication planned: Final report
Upcoming meetings: Fourth meeting scheduled for January 26-27, 2017; fifth meeting scheduled for April 24-25, 2017; sixth meeting scheduled for July 6-7, 2017; all in Washington, DC

Standing Committee on the Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys

Sponsor: National Science Foundation

Duration: March 2015–June 2017

Study director: Cynthia Thomas; project assistant: Eileen LeFurgy

Chair: Barbara Entwisle (University of North Carolina)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they may also stand up workshops or consensus panels. A website is maintained for the committee.

Upcoming meetings: Fourth and last in-person meeting scheduled for December 1-2, 2016, in Washington, DC (by invitation)

Workshop on Prioritizing and Implementing Improvements to Innovation Indicators
Sponsor: National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Duration: September 2015–September 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Scott Stern (MIT)
Publication: Advancing Concepts and Models for Measuring Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop was released in prepublication format, September 16, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Workshop held May 19-20, 2016, in Washington, DC

Workshop on Transparency and Reproducibility in Federal Statistics

Sponsor: National Science Foundation 
Duration: March 2016–March 2017
Study director: Hermann Habermann; senior program officer: Michael Cohen; project assistant: Michael Siri
Chair-designate: William Eddy (Carnegie Mellon University)
Publication planned: Workshop proceedings
Upcoming meetings: Planning meeting held October 4, 2016 in Washington, DC; workshop being scheduled
 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Standing Committee on Creating the American Opportunity Study, First Phase

Sponsor: The Carnegie Corporation of New York

Duration: April 2015–March 2017

Study director: Carol House; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin

Chair: Michael Hout (NYU)

Publications: Standing committees do not issue reports; they meet for discussion; they also identify topics for separate workshops or consensus panels; this committee facilitated a workshop, May 9, 2016, on research uses of the American Opportunity Study (AOS), which is being developed to measure intergenerational mobility by linking 1990 census records (after capturing the necessary information) with subsequent census records, American Community Survey records, and administrative records that become available. The result will be a facility for researchers to obtain extracts of linked files for analysis within the Federal Statistical Research Data Center network (formerly the Census Bureau RDC network). The First-Phase AOS is to address the challenges of capturing linking information for the 1990 census short-form and long-form records, to evaluate the likely quality of matches with other records, and to propose the next phase of work.  A “workshop in brief” proceedings of the May workshop was released July 19, 2016, and is available for download as a free PDF. Presentation slides from the May workshop are also available.

Upcoming meetings: Third meeting TBD 

 

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Panel on the Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration
Sponsor: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Duration: May 2013–October 2016
Study director: Christopher Mackie; associate program officer: Esha Sinha; project assistant: Anthony Mann
Chair: Francine Blau (Cornell University)
Publication: Final report, The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration, cleared review and was released as a prepublication, September 21, 2016 (see “Publication News” above)
Upcoming meetings: Seventh and final meeting (closed) held September 11-12, 2015, in Washington, DC


The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

  

Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods
Sponsor: The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Duration: April 2015–December 2017
Study director: Brian Harris-Kojetin; research assistant: George Schoeffel; project assistant: Agnes Gaskin
Chair: Robert Groves (Georgetown University)
Publication planned: Two reports; first report is in review; a website is maintained for the panel.  
Upcoming meetings: Sixth meeting scheduled for December 14-15, 2016, in Washington, DC

 

NEWS ARCHIVES

CNSTAT News October 2016
CNSTAT News September 2016
CNSTAT News August 2016
CNSTAT News June 2016
CNSTAT News May 2016
CNSTAT News March 2016
CNSTAT News February 2016

CNSTAT News 2015

CNSTAT News 2014

CNSTAT News 2013

CNSTAT News 2012

CNSTAT News 2011

CNSTAT News 2010

CNSTAT News 2009

CNSTAT News 2008

CNSTAT News 2007

 

 

 


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