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Biographical Information on CNSTAT Chairs and Directors

 

WILLIAM H. KRUSKAL (deceased) was the first chair of the Committee on National Statistics, holding that position from 1972–1978. He had previously served as a member of the President’s Commission on Federal Statistics, which recommended the establishment of an independent body at the National Academies to review the nation’s decentralized statistical system. Dr. Kruskal received a B.A. in mathematics and philosophy and an M.A. in mathematics from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from Columbia University.
     Dr. Kruskal joined the faculty of the University of Chicago as an instructor in statistics in 1950 and became professor emeritus in 1990. He founded the Chicago statistics department and served as department chair, dean of the social sciences, and interim dean of the newly established Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies. He was an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Along with W. Allen Wallis, who chaired the President’s Commission on Federal Statistics, he devised the widely used Kruskal-Wallis test.
     Dr. Kruskal worked diligently to establish CNSTAT and recruited its first director, Margaret Martin. 
 
CONRAD TAEUBER (deceased) served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics from 1978–1981 and as a member beginning in 1973. He received a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Taeuber had a long career in federal service (1934–1973), holding positions as economic analyst in the Federal Emergency Relief agency, head economist in the Department of Agriculture, economist at the UN Food and Agricultural Organization, and, beginning in 1951, as an executive at the U.S. Census Bureau. From 1973 until 1985 he was senior professor of demography at the Kennedy Institute of Georgetown University. He was a fellow of the American Statistical Association.
 
STEPHEN E. FIENBERG is Maurice Falk university professor of statistics and social science at Carnegie Mellon University, holding appointments in the Department of Statistics, the Heinz College, the Machine Learning Department, and Cylab. He served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics from 1981–1984 and from 1985– 1987 following a sabbatical year at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He was a member of the committee beginning in 1978. Dr. Fienberg received a B.Sc. in mathematics and statistics from the University of Toronto and an A.M. and Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University. He previously served as vice president of York University, Toronto, and was on the faculty of the University of Minnesota. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and served on the advisory committee of the National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, the Royal Society of Canada, and the Royal Statistical Society, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute.
     Dr. Fienberg has chaired and served on numerous National Research Council panels on such topics as sharing research data, statistical assessments as evidence in the courts, decennial census methodology, evaluation of bilingual education studies, measuring racial discrimination, the polygraph and lie detection, and the technical and privacy dimensions of information on terrorism. He currently serves on the NAS Council and as co-chair of the National Academies’ Report Review Committee.
 
LINCOLN E. MOSES (deceased), formerly a professor emeritus of statistics at Stanford University, served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics in 1985 and was a member in 1976–1977 and 1981–1986. Dr. Moses received an A.B. degree in social sciences and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Stanford University. He was on the faculty of the Stanford statistics department from 1952–1992, serving as head of the department, associate dean of humanities and sciences, and dean of graduate studies. He was the first administrator of the Energy Information Administration from 1978–1980. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Academy of Arts and Sciences, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute.
     Dr. Moses served on numerous Institute of Medicine study committees on such topics as AIDS research and the social, behavioral, and statistical sciences, needle exchange and bleach distribution programs, oral contraceptives and breast cancer, risk assessment of hazardous air pollutants, energy demand analysis, and assessment of research doctorate programs in the United States.
 
BURTON E. SINGER is an adjunct professor at the Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida. He recently retired from Princeton University as the Charles and Marie Robertson professor of public and international affairs. He served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics from 1987–1993 and was a member of the committee from 1981–1985. Dr. Singer received a B.S. in engineering science from the Case Institute of Technology, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Case Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. He previously held faculty positions at the Columbia University Department of Statistics and the Laboratory of Populations at Rockefeller University and at Yale University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and served on the advisory committee of the National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and on the NRC’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
     Dr. Singer has chaired and served on several National Research Council panels on such topics as immigration statistics, assessing studies of bilingual education, future research directions for the social and behavioral sciences at NIH, and modeling the spread of HIV and the demographic effects of AIDS. He is currently a member of the Research Board for the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.
 
NORMAN M. BRADBURN is senior fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago, served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics from 1993–1998 and as vice chair and member beginning in 1987. Dr. Bradburn received a B.A. from the University of Chicago, a B.A. in philosophy, politics, and economics from the University of Oxford, and an M.A. in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University. Most recently, he was the assistant director for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate at the National Science Foundation. He is Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor emeritus at the University of Chicago and former vice president and director of research at NORC. He was provost of the University of Chicago from 1984-1989. He chaired the National Research Council’s Board on International Comparative Studies in Education and was a member of its Advisory Committee for Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute.
     Dr. Bradburn has chaired and served on several National Research Council panels on such topics as alternative methods for the census, the performance of the 2000 census, standards of evidence in the social and behavioral sciences, confidentiality protection and data access, and mandatory retirement in higher education. Most recently, he served as a member of the Committee on an Assessment of Research Doctorate Programs.
 

JOHN E. ROLPH is professor emeritus of statistics in the Department of Data Sciences and Operations at the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California. He currently is proprietor of Rolph Family Vineyards on the California's Central Coast. He served as chair of the Committee on National Statistics from 1998–2004 and as vice chair and member beginning in 1990. He was also a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Law and Justice. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the University of California at Berkeley. He previously was on the research staff of the RAND Corporation. He has also held faculty positions at University College London, Columbia University, the RAND Graduate School for Policy Studies, and the Health Policy Center of RAND/UCLA. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. 
     Dr. Rolph has chaired and served on several National Research Council panels on such topics as methodology for the decennial census, statistical methods for testing and evaluating defense systems, measuring racial discrimination, and evaluating studies of bilingual education. Most recently, chaired the Committee on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database and served on the Panel on Developing Science, Technology, and Innovation Indicators for the Future.

 

WILLIAM F. EDDY is John C. Warner professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University (emeritus), where he also holds appointments in the Machine Learning Department, the Department of Biological Sciences, and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition. He served two terms as chair of the Committee on National Statistics (2004–2010) and previously was a member of the committee from 1996–2000. He received a B.A. in statistics from Princeton University and M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Yale University. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He previously chaired the National Research Council’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics.
     Dr. Eddy has served on numerous National Research Council panels on such topics as transportation surveys and priorities for transportation statistics, natural gas statistics, improving data to analyze food and nutrition policies, statistics and oceanography, guidelines for statistical software, computing and communications research to improve government use of technology, and statistical methods for software engineering for defense systems. Recently, he was a member of the Committee on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database. Most recently he chaired the Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys.


LAWRENCE D. BROWN is Miers Bush professor in the Department of Statistics of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow and past president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a past member of both the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education Advisory Committee and the Committee on National Statistics (1999-2005), and became CNSTAT chair in 2010.
     Most recently, he chaired the Panel to Review the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments; previously, he served on the Panel to Review the 2000 Census and chaired the Panel to Review Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation. He also served on the NRC’s Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and its Board on Mathematical Sciences. He currently serves on the National Academies’ Report Review Committee. He was a critic of the Census Bureau’s plans to incorporate sampling in the census. He has a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University.
 


 
MARGARET E. MARTIN (deceased) was the first director of the Committee on National Statistics (1972–1978). She received a B.A. degree in economics from Barnard College and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Columbia University. Prior to joining CNSTAT, Dr. Martin had a 30-year career in the U.S. Bureau of the Budget’s Division of Statistical Standards, retiring as assistant chief of the Statistical Policy Division in charge of labor and income statistics. She was a fellow of the American Statistical Association and served as its president, and was an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. Dr. Martin continued to contribute to CNSTAT projects after her retirement, including studies of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, sharing research data, and principles and practices for a federal statistical agency.


EDWIN D. GOLDFIELD (deceased) was director of the Committee on National Statistics from 1978 until 1987. He joined CNSTAT in 1975 as study director for the panel that produced Privacy and Confidentiality as Factors in Survey Response. Mr. Goldfield received an M.A. in statistics from Columbia University and did graduate work at American University. He began his career at the U.S. Census Bureau with a temporary appointment in 1940 to work on the processing of the decennial census. That temporary appointment stretched out to a 35-year government career, during which his assignments included program coordinator of the 1950 Decennial Census, chief of the Statistical Reports Division, assistant director of the Bureau, and chief of the International Statistics Program Center. Mr. Goldfield was a fellow of the American Statistical Association and served as president of the Washington Statistical Society. After his retirement from CNSTAT, he remained active as a senior associate.

 

MIRON L. STRAF is deputy director for special projects in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) at the National Academies. He served as director of the Committee on National Statistics (1987–1999) and, prior to that, as research director for the committee. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University and his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and served as its president; he is also a fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. Between his service as CNSTAT director and his appointment as DBASSE deputy director, Dr. Straf worked at the National Science Foundation helping to develop the research priority area for the social, behavioral, and economic sciences. He has taught on the faculties of the University of California, Berkeley, and the London School of Economics and Political Science.
     For CNSTAT, Dr. Straf contributed to studies on environmental monitoring, sharing research data, cognitive aspects of survey methodology (for which he received the Innovators Award of the American Association of Public Opinion Research), and statistical assessments as evidence in the courts. He was the prime mover behind CNSTAT’s influential white paper, Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency. During his time with CNSTAT, he developed over 50 major studies and over 40 conferences on the application of statistics to public policy. His recent projects for DBASSE include studies leading to the reports Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy and Furthering America’s Research Enterprise.

 

ANDREW A. WHITE is senior research statistician at the National Center for Education Statistics at the U.S. Department of Education. He served as director of the Committee on National Statistics from 2000 through 2003. He served as deputy director (1997–1999) and as senior study director (1996–1997) on an intergovernmental personnel agreement with the National Center for Health Statistics. He received a B.A. in political science and an M.P.H. and Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining CNSTAT, Dr. White was a survey designer, research staff chief, and executive staff member of the National Center for Health Statistics and a consulting statistician with the Michigan Department of Public Health. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Educational Research Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and a past president of the Washington Statistical Society.

     For CNSTAT, he directed a study on methods for the 2000 census, and contributed to studies on methods for accounting for environmental costs and benefits in the national income and product accounts, and the research programs of the Economic Research Service at USDA.

 

CONSTANCE F. CITRO became director of the Committee on National Statistics in 2004. She began her career with CNSTAT in 1984 as study director for the panel that produced The Bicentennial Census: New Directions for Methodology in 1990. Dr. Citro received her B.A. in political science from the University of Rochester, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. Prior to joining CNSTAT, she held positions as vice president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and Data Use and Access Laboratories, Inc. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. 
     For CNSTAT, she directed evaluations of the 2000 census, the U.S. poverty measure, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, microsimulation models for social welfare programs, and the NSF science and engineering personnel data system, in addition to studies on institutional review boards and social science research, estimates of poverty for small geographic areas, data and methods for retirement income modeling, and 1990 census methodology. She contributed to studies on research needs for evaluation of changes in welfare programs, principles and practices for a federal statistical agency, measuring racial discrimination, and the American Community Survey.
 

 

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