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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations

Biosketches

THOMAS M. COOK (chair) (NAE) is cofounder of Decision Analytics International, a firm created to apply advanced analytics to problems in the airline industry. Previously, he was president of SABRE Decision Technologies, where he was responsible for a 2,700-person consulting and software development company specializing in providing solutions to the travel and transportation industry. He has served as chairman and CEO of CALEB Technologies Corporation, president of T.C.I. Consulting, and senior counselor at McKinsey and Company. In his career at AMR Corporation, he was director of operations research for American Airlines, from which SABRE emerged as a separate entity. Dr. Cook has also held positions at the University of Tulsa and Arthur Young and Company. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1995 for leadership in advancing operations research within the transportation industry and has served as president of the Institute of Management Sciences and the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). He served as co-chair of the Panel to Review the 2010 Census until May 1, 2011, when he became full chair upon Janet Norwood’s decision to revert to placement on the general panel roster. He holds an MBA in quantitative analysis from Southern Methodist University, and a Ph.D. degree in operations research from the University of Texas.

JACK BAKER is senior research scientist in the Geospatial and Population Studies Program at the University of New Mexico. Since 2006, he has represented New Mexico in the Federal-State Cooperative Programs on Population Estimates (FSCPE) and Population Projections (FSCPP). He participated extensively in preparations for the 2010 census, with an emphasis on Master Address File improvement efforts including the 2010 Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) program and the 2010 Count Review Program (chairing the FSCPE committee that focused on redesigning this process and as a consultant to the Bureau on use of GIS technology to perform the review). Dr. Baker continues to serve on numerous FSCPE committees. His scientific research focuses primarily on methods for modeling small area populations using incomplete data, geospatial demographic methods, historical demography, and biodemography. At the National Research Council, he served on the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He has a B.A. degree from the University of North Dakota, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of New Mexico, all in anthropology.

BRADFORD J. BOSTON became president and chief executive officer of NetNumber, Inc., in July 2013. He joined NetNumber—a leading provider of signal routing and database services to the communications industry—after retiring from Cisco in 2012. He began at Cisco in August 2001 as chief information officer and most recently served as senior vice president for the company’s Global Government Solutions Group and Corporate Security Programs Organization. Prior to joining Cisco, he was executive vice president of operations at Corio, an Internet application services provider. During his earlier tenure as executive vice president of product development and delivery and president of Sabre Computer Services at the Sabre Group, he led the largest systems conversion in the airline industry when US Airways converted to Sabre and guided the early development and operations of Travelocity.com; he also architected a technology plan to modernize Sabre's system infrastructure and applications. He has also held executive positions at American Express, Visa, United Airlines/Covia, American National Bank, and Trust Company of Chicago. He is also a member of the board of directors of Koolspan, a mobile security product company, and Vectrus, a defense-focused services company. He holds a B.S. degree in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

WARREN A. BROWN is senior research associate at the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research at Cornell University, where he also directs the Cornell Secure Data Service. Previously, at Cornell, he was director of the Program on Applied Demographics, in which capacity he was responsible for producing population estimates and projections for the state of New York. He has also held appointment as public service associate and director of the applied demography program at the Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the University of Georgia (the program charged with providing population estimates and projections for Georgia, in partnership with the state Office of Planning and Budget). Dr. Brown has represented New York in the Census Bureau’s Federal-State Cooperative Programs for Population Estimates and Population Projections, serving as chair of the population estimates group. He also served on the Population Association of America’s Committee on Challenges to Population Estimates, Advisory Committee on the Demographic Full Count Review, and Committee on Applied Demography. At Cornell, he also served as research director of the university’s Census Research Data Center. In 2014, he is president of the Association of Public Data Users. At the National Research Council, he served on the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He has a B.A. degree in religious studies from the University of Virginia, an M.A. degree in sociology from the New School for Social Research, and a Ph.D. in development sociology from Cornell University.

DONALD F. COOKE was community maps project manager at Esri in Redlands, California, a position he left in early 2015. He was a member of the 1967 Census Bureau team that developed the Dual Independent Map Encoding (DIME) topological approach to a spatial database as part of the New Haven Census Use Project. The DIME methodology was a key predecessor to the Census Bureau’s Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) system and of the modern geographic information systems industry. In 1980, Dr. Cooke founded Geographic Data Technology, Inc. (GDT), with which the Census Bureau contracted to digitize the original TIGER data files. GDT was acquired by Tele Atlas in 2004, and he was chief scientist at Tele Atlas North America through February 2010. He received the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association’s Horwood award in 2004 and Esri’s lifetime achievement award in 2007. At the National Research Council, he has served on the Mapping Science Committee and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He is a graduate of Yale University with a B.S. degree in administrative services, and studied civil engineering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

IVAN P. FELLEGI is chief statistician of Canada emeritus. He joined Statistics Canada in 1957, serving as director of sampling research and consultation and director general of methodology and systems, assistant chief statistician, and deputy chief statistician before his appointment as chief statistician. He has published extensively in the areas of census and survey methodology, in particular on consistent editing rules and record linkage. A past chair of the Conference of European Statisticians of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Dr. Fellegi is an honorary member and past president of the International Statistical Institute, an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, past president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians, and past president and Gold Medal recipient of the Statistical Society of Canada. He was made Member of the Order of Canada in 1992, promoted to Officer in 1998, and has received the nation’s Outstanding Achievement Award. He has also provided advice on statistical matters to his native Hungary following its transition to democracy, and in 2004 he was awarded the Order of Merit of the Republic of Hungary. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Privacy and Confidentiality as Factors in Survey Response, the Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond, the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology, the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments, and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He has a B.Sc. degree from the University of Budapest, and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in survey methodology from Carleton University.

SUSAN HANSON (NAS) is distinguished university professor emerita in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. She is an urban geographer with interests in gender and economy, transportation, local labor markets, and sustainability. Her research has examined the relationship between the urban built environment and people’s everyday mobility within cities; within this context, questions of access to opportunity, and how gender affects access, have been paramount. Dr. Hanson has led the School of Geography at Clark, and is a past president of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a former Guggenheim fellow, a former fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Social and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and a recipient of the Honors Award and of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the AAG and of the Van Cleef Medal from the American Geographic Society. In 2000, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her current activities include serving as division chair of the Transportation Research Board of the National Research Council (NRC), member of the advisory board of the NRC’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and member of the editorial board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She has a B.A. degree in geography from Middlebury College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Northwestern University.

VINCENT L. HUTCHINGS is professor of political science at the University of Michigan, where he also holds appointment at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research (ISR). At ISR, he served as the University of Michigan's principal investigator for the American National Election Study for the 2012 and (along with Ted Brader) the 2016 election cycles. His general research interests include public opinion, elections, voting behavior, and African American politics. He is the author of Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability: How Citizens Learn About Politics (2003), that examines how citizens monitor (and influence) their elected representative’s voting behavior. He serves on the board of overseers for the General Social Survey. In 2012, he was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Scholar from 2000-2002. He holds a B.A. in political science from San Jose State University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science, both from the University of California, Los Angeles.

MICHAEL D. LARSEN is associate professor in the Department of Statistics and faculty member of the Biostatistics Center at George Washington University. He has been elected to four positions in the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association, including program chair for 2012 and chair-elect for 2015. He has served as executive editor of CHANCE magazine, associate editor for a number of journals, and on the Census Advisory Committee of the American Statistical Association. At the National Research Council, he served on the Panel to Review the 2010 Census and the Steering Committee for a Workshop on Surveying Nonprofit Organizations about research and development. Dr. Larsen received his B.A. degree in mathematics and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Harvard University. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and elected member of the International Statistical Institute.

GEORGE T. LIGLER is a private consultant operating his own firm, GTL Associates, in Fuquay Varina, North Carolina. He has extensive experience in information management and software and computer system engineering, as is evident from his work at Burroughs Corporation (1980–1982), Computer Sciences Corporation (1984–1988), and at GTL Associates, a private company that he founded that provides consulting services in computer and telecommunications systems engineering as well as systems integration and product management. At the National Research Council, he served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board’s Committee to Review the Tax Systems Modernization of the Internal Revenue Service. Dr. Ligler also served as a member of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods (2010 census planning), and was a member of the expert committee separately formed by U.S. Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez to advise on options for the Census Bureau’s replan of its Field Data Collection Automation Contract in early 2008. He served on the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. A Rhodes Scholar, he received his B.S. degree in mathematics from Furman University, and his M.Sc. and D.Phil. degrees from the University of Oxford.

LOUIS A. MARTIN-VEGA is dean of engineering at North Carolina State University, whose faculty he joined in 2006 after five years as dean of engineering at the University of South Florida. Previously, he served as acting head of the engineering directorate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and director of NSF's Division of Design, Manufacture, and Industrial Innovation. He has also served as chair of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering at Lehigh University and Lockheed professor of engineering at the Florida Institute of Technology, and held tenured faculty positions at the University of Florida and the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. Dr. Martin-Vega’s primary research interests are in production and manufacturing systems, logistics and distribution, operations management, and engineering education. He is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE), was awarded IIE's highest honor (the Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Industrial Engineering Award) in 2012, and is a recipient of IIE's Albert Holzman Distinguished Educator Award and UPS Award for Minority Advancement in Industrial Engineering. He is also a fellow of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and member of the Pan American Academy of Engineering. He received a B.S. degree in industrial engineering from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, an M.S. degree in operations research from New York University, and M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Florida.

NICOLAS N. NAGLE is associate professor of geographic information science at the University of Tennessee–Knoxville, where he also serves as a joint faculty affiliate with the Geographic Information Science and Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. From 2009–2012, he was research assistant professor in the University of Tennessee's Center for Business and Economic Research, in which capacity he worked with the Census Bureau's Federal-State Cooperative Program on Population Estimates. With Seth Spielman (University of Colorado at Boulder), he is co-principal investigator of a node of the National Science Foundation-Census Research Network (NCRN), focused on bridging the spatial and survey sciences and improving the utility of small-area estimates based on data from the federal statistical system, particularly those from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey. Prior to joining the Tennessee faculty, he held appointment on the geography faculty of the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has a B.A. degree in public policy from the University of Chicago, M.A. degrees in both geography and economics, and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

H. DONALD RATLIFF (NAE) is Regents professor emeritus and executive director of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute at the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering of the Georgia Institute of Technology. In 1979, he co-founded and subsequently served as chief executive officer of CAPS Logistics, which became a leading developer and marketer of planning and scheduling optimization software for supply chain and transportation planning. His research and development interests include intermodal network design, real-time routing, shipment planning, and logistics performance measurement. Dr. Ratliff is a fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and a recipient of its outstanding research award, and is a fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. In May 2014, he was named chair of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on the Future of Logistics and Supply Chains. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1998 for his work in interactive network optimization methods for logistics systems, and chaired an NAE Panel on Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Services. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in industrial engineering from the University of Alabama, and a Ph.D. in operations research from Johns Hopkins University.

NATHANIEL SCHENKER is deputy director of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prior to this he was associate director for research and methodology and senior scientist, both at NCHS. He is also adjunct professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology administered by the University of Maryland, University of Michigan, and Westat. Prior to this he was associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles, and mathematical statistician at the Bureau of the Census. His research interests include handling incomplete data, census and survey methods, survival analysis, statistical computation, and applications of statistics to the health and social sciences. Dr. Schenker served as president of the American Statistical Association in 2014, and as program chair of the Joint Statistical meetings. He was also editor of a special section of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies, and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. Recently, Dr. Schenker received the Owen Thornberry Excellence in Leadership Award from the NCHS. Other awards include the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics from the American Statistical Association, and the Founders Award for Distinguished Service from the ASA. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University, and S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the University of Chicago.

JUDITH A. SELTZER is professor of sociology and director of the California Center for Population Research, both at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. Her research interests include kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonresident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other policies affect family change. She recently collaborated with an interdisciplinary team to add a new module on intergenerational transfers to the 2013 Panel Study of Income Dynamics. She currently serves on the steering committee for a project to assess the need for data on U.S. families and households. She also is a member of the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey. In 2015, Dr. Seltzer will serve as president-elect of the Population Association of America, and she will serve as president in 2016. At the National Research Council, she has served on the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments, and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan.

C. MATTHEW SNIPP is Burnet C. and Milfred Finley Wohlford professor of sociology at Stanford University. At Stanford, he currently serves as director of the Secure Data Center, deputy director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, and chair of the Native American Studies program. He is the former director of the Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity. Dr. Snipp has written extensively on American Indians and specifically on the interaction of American Indians and the U.S. census. He has served on the Census Bureau’s Technical Advisory Committee on Racial and Ethnic Statistics and the Native American Population Advisory Committee. Prior to moving to Stanford, he was associate professor and professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he held affiliate appointments with several other units, and assistant and associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland. At the National Research Council, Dr. Snipp was a member of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods (2010 Census planning), the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He has an A.B. in sociology from the University of California, Davis, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

MARVIN WHITE returned as chief technology officer at Sportvision in May 2015, a position he previously held for nearly 12 years prior to a 5-year run as vice president and distinguished engineer at ESPN. At Sportvision, as at ESPN, he is responsible for discovering and developing new technologies to better serve sports fans through broadcast, internet, and mobile platforms. During his first run at Sportvision, he helped introduce the “1st and Ten” system for displaying a virtual first-down line in American football broadcasts, the PITCHf/x system to track and display every pitch in Major League Baseball broadcasts, and other virtual effects. He moved to Sportvision after 14 years as general manager of Etak, an early developer of vehicle navigation and mapping systems, where he was responsible for automated, commercial mapping. During his earlier tenure with the Statistical Research Division of the U.S. Census Bureau, his work in demonstrating a topologically-structured approach for managing large, complex map databases led directly to the formation of the first version of the Census Bureau’s TIGER geographic database. He has a B.S. degree in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and undertook some graduate work in physics at the University of California, Los Angeles.



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