Skip to Main Content
 
  
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
Workshop on Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey
March 8-9, 2016

The U.S. Census Bureau desires to continually improve the American Community Survey (ACS) and, in particular, to respond to concerns of the public and Congress about the actual and perceived burden of the questionnaire and the communication and follow-up procedures with respondents. The Census Bureau has requested the assistance of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) in moving
toward reduction of burden for the ACS by convening an expert steering committee to conduct a public workshop. The workshop is intended to shed light on ACS burden concerns and challenges and opportunities for addressing them through public discussion among a wide range of stakeholders. It will result in a written summary of the proceedings.

The workshop focused on four main topics: 1) matrix sampling -- to reduce the number of individuals that various questions are posed to; 2) direct substitution of information from administrative records and therefore elimination of some questions on the ACS (at least for some respondents); 3) having a separate, reduced-size questionnaire that eliminates unreasonable questions for respondents living in group quarters; and 4) a communication and education strategy that focuses both on the respondent materials and request sequencing as well as materials for stakeholders, all with the goal to increase cooperation with the request to participate.

This workshop was held as part of the project Improving the American Community Survey (ACS) through a Workshop and Expert Meetings.


AGENDA


Tuesday, March 8

Session I: Understanding Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey

ACS Successes and Challenges Regarding Respondent Burden
Deborah Stempowski, U.S. Census Bureau

Defining, Measuring, and Mitigating Respondent Burden
Scott Fricker, Bureau of Labor Statistics


Session II: Communicating with Respondents: Materials and the Sequencing of those Materials

American Community Survey Mail Contact Strategy and Research
Elizabeth Poehler, U.S. Census Bureau

Improving Response to the American Community Survey (ACS)

Don Dillman, Washington State University

ACS Respondent Materials and Sequencing: Application of a Responsive and Adaptive Survey Design Framework

Andy Peytchev, University of Michigan

Communicating with Respondents: Material and Sequencing in the ACS (Discussion)
Nancy Mathiowetz, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Communicating the American Community Survey’s Value to Respondents
Andrew Reamer, George Washington University


Session III: The American Community Survey: Communicating the Importance to the American Public

Branding the American Community Survey: Communicating the Importance to the American Public

Sandra Bauman, Bauman Research and Consulting

Communicating the Importance to the American Public
George Terhanian, NPD Group


Session IV: Tailoring the Group Quarters Questionnaire

The Feasibility of Tailoring Group Quarters (GQ) Specific Questionnaires in the American Community Survey (ACS)

Judy Belton, U.S. Census Bureau

Comments for Session IV: Tailoring the Group Quarters Questionnaire

Barbara Anderson, University of Michigan

ACS Group Quarters: Removing Questions from the Paper Questionnaire
Andy Peytchev, University of Michigan


Session V: Use of Administrative Records to Reduce Burden and Improve Quality

Use of Administrative Records to Reduce Burden and Improve Quality
Amy O’Hara, U.S. Census Bureau

Comments on Presentation by Amy O’Hara
Paul Biemer, RTI International and University of North Carolina

Use of Administrative Records to Reduce Burden and Improve Quality: A Discussion
Mike Davern, NORC


Wednesday, March 9

Session VII: Matrix Sampling and Multi-Phase Sampling

Overview of Feasibility Assessment of Using Matrix Sampling and Other Methods to Reduce Respondent Burden
Mark Asiala, U.S. Census Bureau

Utilizing Matrix Sampling to Reduce Respondent Burden
Jeffrey Gonzalez, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Planned “Missingness” Designs and the American Community Survey (ACS)
Steven Heeringa, University of Michigan

A Full Information Maximum Likelihood (FIML) Approach to Compensating for Missing Data in Matrix Sampling
Paul Biemer, RTI International and University of North Carolina


Session VIII: Modeling and Imputation


Modeling and Imputation Discussion
Michael Brick, Westat


Session IX: Administrative Records and the ACS: Future Directions

Administrative Records and the ACS: Future Directions
Frauke Kreuter, University of Maryland

Administrative Records and the ACS: Future Directions
Julia Lane, New York University




Home BOHSI Home Home BOSE Home C-CAB Home BECS Home BCYF Home TAC Home Home BOTA Home CPOP Home CNSTAT Home CLAJ Home BBCSS Home About BOSE BOSE Mission BOSE Members BOSE Staff Our Sponsors Visiting our Buildings About BBCSS BBCSS History BBCSS Members BBCSS Staff Our Sponsors About CPOP CPOP Mission CPOP Members CPOP Staff About TAC TAC History TAC Members TAC Associates by State TAC Staff About CNSTAT CNSTAT Members CNSTAT Staff CNSTAT Mission Other Sites of Interest TEstTAc2 About BOTA BOTA Mission BOTA Members BOTA Staff Visiting Our Buildings About CLAJ CLAJ Mission CLAJ Members CLAJ Staff Other Sites of Interest About BECS BECS in Brief BECS Brochure BECS Statement of Task BECS Members BECS Staff About BCYF BCYF History BCYF Graphic Illustration BCYF Members BCYF Staff About BOHSI BOHSI History BOHSI Members BOHSI Staff Our Sponsors