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book coverAssessment of Corrosion Education   (NMAB)
Released 2009-02-12

The threat from the degradation of materials in engineered products has been well documented over the years. And yet little effort appears to have been made to developing a better understanding of corrosion and the mitigation of its effects. Assessment of Corrosion Education makes a number of short- and long-term recommendations to industry and government agencies, educational institutions, and communities to increase education and awareness.

book coverEvaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Options for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant   (BICE)
Released 2009-08-12

The U.S. Capitol Complex in Washington, D.C., comprises some of the most historic and symbolic buildings in the nation. The steam and chilled water required to heat and cool these buildings and related equipment is generated and distributed by the Capitol Power Plant (CPP) district energy system. Portions of the CPP system are now 50 to 100 years old and require renewal so that reliable utility services can be provided to the U.S. Capitol Complex for the foreseeable future. Evaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Options for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant provides comments on an interim set of publicly available consultant-generated options for the delivery of utility services to the U.S. Capitol Complex. The report provides recommendations to bring the interim options to completion, including suggestions for additional analyses, so that the CPP can be best positioned to meet the future strategic and energy efficiency requirements of the U.S. Capitol Complex.

book coverAdvancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry   (BICE)
Released 2009-11-09

Construction productivity--how well, how quickly, and at what cost buildings and infrastructure can be constructed--directly affects prices for homes and consumer goods and the robustness of the national economy. Industry analysts differ on whether construction industry productivity is improving or declining. Still, advances in available and emerging technologies offer significant opportunities to improve construction efficiency substantially in the 21st century and to help meet other national challenges, such as environmental sustainability. Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry identifies five interrelated activities that could significantly improve the quality, timeliness, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of construction projects. These activities include widespread deployment and use of interoperable technology applications; improved job-site efficiency through more effective interfacing of people, processes, materials, equipment, and information; greater use of prefabrication, preassembly, modularization, and off-site fabrication techniques and processes; innovative, widespread use of demonstration installations; and effective performance measurement to drive efficiency and support innovation. The book recommends that the National Institute of Standards and Technology work with industry leaders to develop a collaborative strategy to fully implement and deploy the five activities

book coverReview of the Bureau of Reclamation's Corrosion Prevention Standards for Ductile Iron Pipe   (NMAB)
Released 2009-11-19

Ductile iron pipe (DIP) was introduced about 50 years ago as a more economical and better-performing product for water transmission and distribution. As with iron or steel pipes, DIP is subject to corrosion, the rate of which depends on the environment in which the pipe is placed. Corrosion mitigation protocols are employed to slow the corrosion process to an acceptable rate for the application. When to use corrosion mitigation systems, and which system, depends on the corrosivity of the soils in which the pipeline is buried. The Bureau of Reclamation's specification for DIP in highly corrosive soil has been contested by some as an overly stringent requirement, necessitating the pipe to be modified from its as-manufactured state and thereby addin unnecessary cost to a pipeline system. This report evaluates the specifications in question and presents findings and recommendations. Specifically, the authoring committee answers the following questions: Does polyethylene encasement with cathodic protection work on ductile iron pipe installed in highly corrosive soils? Will polyethylene encasement and cathodic protection reliably provide a minimum service life of 50 years? What possible alternative corrosion mitigation methods for DIP would provide a service life of 50 years?