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book coverApplication of Lightweighting Technology to Military Vehicles, Vessels, and Aircraft   (NMMB)
Released 2012-03-27

Application of Lightweighting Technology to Military Vehicles, Vessels, and Aircraft assesses the current state of, and recommendations for, lightweighting design and development in land, sea, and air vehicles-primarily those developed or used by the military. In addition to reducing the weight of materials, the report outlines other, more systematic considerations, including innovative architectural design; lighter, more durable materials development; and research on preventing manufacturing defects and improving the multifunctionality of parts and devices. That is, a more comprehensive design and acquisition process could increase attributes such as the maneuverability, durability, range, payload capacity, performance, fuel consumption and survivability, while reducing excess weight.

book coverPredicting Outcomes from Investments in Maintenance and Repair for Federal Facilities   (BICE)
Released 2012-01-30

The deteriorating condition of federal facilities poses economic, safety, operational, and environmental risks to the federal government, to the achievement of the missions of federal agencies, and to the achievement of public policy goals. Primary factors underlying this deterioration are the age of federal facilities--about half are at least 50 years old--and decades of inadequate investment for their maintenance and repair. These issues are not new and there are no quick fixes. However, the current operating environment provides both the impetus and the opportunity to place investments in federal facilities' maintenance and repair on a new, more sustainable course for the 21st Century. Despite the magnitude of investments, funding for the maintenance and repair of federal facilities has been inadequate for many years, and myriad projects have been deferred. Predicting Outcomes of Investments in Maintenance and Repair of Federal Facilities identifies processes and practices for transforming the current portfolio of federal facilities into one that is more economically, physically, and environmentally sustainable. This report addresses ways to predict or quantify the outcomes that can be expected from a given level of maintenance and repair investments in federal facilities or facilities' systems, and what strategies, measures, and data should be in place to determine the actual outcomes of facilities maintenance and repair investments.

book coverAchieving High-Performance Federal Facilities: Strategies and Approaches for Transformational Change   (BICE)
Released 2011-11-07

The design, construction, operation, and retrofit of buildings is evolving in response to ever-increasing knowledge about the impact of indoor environments on people and the impact of buildings on the environment. Research has shown that the quality of indoor environments can affect the health, safety, and productivity of the people who occupy them. Buildings are also resource intensive, accounting for 40 percent of primary energy use in the United States, 12 percent of water consumption, and 60 percent of all non-industrial waste. The processes for producing electricity at power plants and delivering it for use in buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. federal government manages approximately 429,000 buildings of many types with a total square footage of 3.34 billion worldwide, of which about 80 percent is owned space. More than 30 individual departments and agencies are responsible for managing these buildings. The characteristics of each agency's portfolio of facilities are determined by its mission and its programs. In 2010, GSA's Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings asked the National Academies to appoint an ad hoc committee of experts to conduct a public workshop and prepare a report that identified strategies and approaches for achieving a range of objectives associated with high-performance green federal buildings. Achieving High-Performance Federal Facilities identifies examples of important initiatives taking place and available resources. The report explores how these examples could be used to help make sustainability the preferred choice at all levels of decision making. Achieving High-Performance Federal Facilities can serve as a valuable guide federal agencies with differing missions, types of facilities, and operating procedures.

book coverEngineering Aviation Security Environments--False Alarm Reduction: Interim Report (Letter Report)   (NMMB)
Released 2011-03-29