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PROJECTS  
 

Globalization of S&T: Opportunities and Challenges for DOD (GSTOC)

 
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Background: International collaboration in science and technology (S&T) has expanded exponentially over the past two decades and is now considered the norm within the open scientific community.  Today, many countries no longer have monopolies in areas where there was no competition as recently as a decade ago. Even for fields in which technological dominance still exists, the gap between leader and established followers (and increasingly new players) is shrinking. This shift in S&T competitiveness is illustrated by the volatility of technological leadership in fields such as supercomputing, where the “cutting edge” is often measured in months. Thus, doing the best science means that researchers from academia, industry, and government need to maintain an awareness of advancements in S&T throughout the world.  The purpose of this study is to assess current global S&T engagement practices used by the research arms of the U.S. Department of Defense to take advantage of the opportunities and deal with the challenges brought about by the globalization of S&T. 

The Committee on Globalization of Science and Technology: Opportunities and Challenges is conducting an assessment of the opportunities and challenges of the globalization of S&T for the Department of Defense and the Services (U.S. Army, Air Force, and Navy). The committee will assess (a) current DoD strategies in the three Services for leveraging global S&T and how they are being implemented, (b) past outcomes of these efforts, and (c) the impact these efforts have had on the U.S. Defense S&T enterprise. The committee will consider models for global S&T engagement utilized by other national and international organizations, including the cost effectiveness and efficiency of those approaches and how taking advantage of globalization can shorten the transition time from research to fielded product. The committee will also assess how the ongoing globalization of S&T may impact the future DoD mission space (e.g., research funding/priorities, workforce needs, science diplomacy, operational readiness, avoiding technology surprise, etc.). In addition to findings, the committee may also make recommendations for future DoD and Service strategies to better meet the challenges and opportunities that result from the ongoing globalization of S&T. The product of this project will be a committee-produced, and NRC-reviewed, consensus report containing the findings and/or recommendations of the study committee. 

The sponsors of the study are the Office of Naval Research, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology.
 

Committee Members: Ruth David (Co-chair, Analytic Services Inc.), Arden Bement (Co-chair, Purdue University), Jim C.I. Chang (National Cheng Kung University), C.W. Paul Chu (University of Houston), Susan Cozzens (Georgia Institute of Technology), Patricia Gruber (Battelle Memorial Institute), Daniel Hastings (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Peter Hoffman (The Boeing Company), Celia Merzbacher (Semiconductor Research Corporation), Anthony (Bud) Rock (Association of Science and Technology Centers), and James Wilsdon (University of Sussex).

Click HERE for committee member biographies.

National Academies Staff: Ethan Chiang (Co-study director), William Berry (Co-study director), Patricia Wrightson, and Neeraj Gorkhaly. 


Meetings:

February 13-14, 2013: Washington, D.C. (meeting materials available HERE)
April 3-4, 2013: Washington, D.C. (meeting materials available HERE)
July 24-25, 2013: Washington, D.C. (meeting materials available HERE)
October 29-30, 2013: Washington, D.C.
January 23, 2013: Washington, D.C. (closed meeting)

Overseas Visits:

April 29-May 1, 2013: Tokyo, Japan
May 2-3, 2013: Taipei, Taiwan
July 31-August 2, 2013: Bangkok, Thailand
August 5-8, 2013: Canberra, Australia
October 7-8, 2013: London, England
October 9, 2013: Brussels, Belgium
October 10-11, 2013: Stockholm, Sweden

Click HERE for relevant reading materials.


 

 
Integrating Humans, Machines, and Networks (CHMNI)
 
 
CHMNI LOGOBackground: The Committee on Integrating Humans, Machines and Networks: A Global Review of Data-to-Decision Technologies is conducting an analytical assessment of global research efforts in several technologies that enable humans, machines and computer systems to collaboratively digest and analyze vast amounts of unstructured data in dynamic environments to make decisions. The purpose of this study is to create a coherent and integrated global picture of progress achieved and the challenges ahead.

The sponsor of the study is the National Ground Intelligenc Center of the U.S. Army. 


Committee Members: Jacques S. Gansler (Chair, University of Maryland), Mary (Missy) Cummings (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Barbara J. Grosz (Harvard University), Anita Jones (University of Virginia), Amy A. Kruse (Intific, Inc.), George (Ron) Mangun (University of California – Davis), Tom Mitchell (Carnegie Mellon University), See-Kiong Ng (Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Donald A. Norman (Nielsen Norman Group), Guillermo R. Sapiro (Duke University), Ross Shachter (Stanford University), James D. Shields (Charles Stark Draper Laboratory), Liz Sonenberg (University of Melbourne), Katia Sycara (Carnegie Mellon University), Alyson Wilson (Institute for Defense Analyses), and Victor W. Zue (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

National Academies Staff: Patricia Wrightson (Study director), Bill Berry, Ethan Chiang, and Neeraj Gorkhaly.
 

Meetings:

·          1st meeting: December 18-19, 2012 in Washington, D.C. (meeting materials available HERE)

·          2nd meeting: February 26-27, 2013 in Washington, D.C. (meeting materials available HERE)

·          3rd meeting: June 12-13, 2013 in Woods Hole, MA

Click HERE to read relevant National Academies reports.

 

PAST PROJECTS  

The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing (2012)
 
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The Committee on Global Approaches to Advanced Computing, an ad hoc committee of the Board on Global Science and Technology (BGST), conducted a study, The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing, to describe and assess the global S&T landscape for responding to the challenges of sustaining historical trends in computing performance improvement in general and to the challenge presented by the shift to multicore processors in particular.  The committee examined the technical challenges associated with “cutting edge” approaches in computing hardware and software, described the global research landscape, and explored the implications of these global advances for the U.S. S&T enterprise and for U.S. competition and national security. Rather than formal recommendations, the report presents an assessment of the technical consequences from the end of Dennard scaling, the cultural and economic challenges of parallelism, the possible shifts of capital and talent, and national and regional investments in IT research.

Click HERE to freely download this report. 

Committee Members: Daniel Reed (Chair, Microsoft Corporation), Cong Cao (University of Nottingham), Tai Cheung (University of California, San Diego), John Crawford (Intel Corporation), Dieter Ernst (East-West Center), Mark Hill (University of Wisconsin - Madison), Steven Keckler (NVIDIA Corporation), David Liddle (U.S. Venture Partners), and Kathryn McKinley (University of Texas at Austin).

National Academies Staff: William Berry (Study Director), Ethan Chiang (Lead staffer), Lynette Millett, and Neeraj Gorkhaly.

 
Intelligent Human-Machine Collaboration (2012)
 
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The Committee on Homeland Security and Export Controls, an ad hoc committee of the Board on Global Science and Technology (BGST), conducted a study, Export Control Challenges Associated with Homeland Security, on the impact of export controls on the DHS mission to strengthen the U.S. security envelope abroad. The committee examined the current impact of export controls on the research, development and possible foreign deployment of S&T Directorate programs. To that end, the committee assessed the effectiveness of factoring export controls into programmatic decision-making within DHS, and reviewed the Department's role in the export control interagency process.  The committee found that (1) DHS’s international mission needs to be better understood both within and outside the Department; (2) DHS would benefit from greater coherence in its internal approach to export controls; and that reforms recommended by the Administration’s Export Control Reform effort would strengthen DHS’ role in the interagency export control process.
 
Click HERE to freely download this report.
Workshop Planning Committee Members: Jeffrey Bradshaw (Chair, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition), Dianne Chong (The Boeing Company), Gal Kaminka (Bar Ilan University), Geert-Jan Kruijff (German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence), and Brian Williams (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).
National Academies Staff: Ethan Chiang (lead staffer), Bill Berry, Neeraj Gorkhaly, and Patricia Wrightson.

Export Control Challenges Associated with Homeland Security (2012)

CHSEC Cover
The Committee on Homeland Security and Export Controls, an ad hoc committee of the Board on Global Science and Technology (BGST), conducted a study, Export Control Challenges Associated with Homeland Security, on the impact of export controls on the DHS mission to strengthen the U.S. security envelope abroad. The committee examined the current impact of export controls on the research, development and possible foreign deployment of S&T Directorate programs. To that end, the committee assessed the effectiveness of factoring export controls into programmatic decision-making within DHS, and reviewed the Department's role in the export control interagency process.  The committee found that (1) DHS’s international mission needs to be better understood both within and outside the Department; (2) DHS would benefit from greater coherence in its internal approach to export controls; and that reforms recommended by the Administration’s Export Control Reform effort would strengthen DHS’ role in the interagency export control process.

Click HERE to freely download this report.
Committee Members: William Schneider (Co-chair, International Planning Services, Inc.), Mitch Wallerstein (Co-chair, Baruch College, City University of New York), Rich Barth (TAE), Larry Christensen (Miller& Chevalier Chartered), Vincent DeCain (DeCain Group), Carol Fuchs (General Electric), G. Christopher Griner (Kaye Scholer LLP ), Carol Kessler (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), Martha Krebs (California Energy Commission), Deanne Siemer (Wilsie Co. LLC), Kathryn Sullivan (National Science Foundation), William Toby (Harvard University), and Christopher Wall (Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP).

National Academies Staff: Patricia Wrightson (Study Director), Ethan Chiang, and Neeraj Gorkhaly.
 
Realizing the Value from Big Data (2011)

Value from Big Data
On February 28-March 2, BGST conducted an international, multidisciplinary workshop on “Realizing the Value from Big Data” in Singapore. The workshop was jointly organized and hosted by the Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R) of Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) at Fusionopolis. This workshop convened bioinformatics scientists and environmental scientists with computational/data scientists to assess and project the impact of complex datasets in their fields. The domain scientists worked together with the computational scientists to find common ground and to identify the computational and policy roadblocks that prevent their disciplines from fully extracting value from ”big data”.   The participants, many of whom brought extensive international experience, were drawn from research organizations in Australia, China, England, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Portugal, Singapore, and the United States.

Click HERE to freely download this report.
Workshop Planning Committee Members: Ruth David (Chair, Analytic Services Inc.), Kin Mun Lye (Singapore's Agency for Science and Technology), Bernard Meyerson (IBM Corp.), See-Kiong Ng (Singapore's Agency for Science and Technology), and Michael Yan Wah Chia (Singapore's Agency for Science and Technology).

National Academies Staff: Patricia Wrightson (lead staffer), Bill Berry, Ethan Chiang, and Neeraj Gorkhaly.

A View of Global Science & Technology: Letter Report (2011)

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This letter report describes the 2009-2011 activities of the Board on Global Science and Technology (BGST) and provides an initial characterization of the global science and technology landscape that the Board can use as a roadmap to develop future activities. BGST met five times between November 2009 and May 2011. Board meetings were devoted to (1) identifying national security implications of the globalization of S&T, (2) building a baseline understanding of current indicators for the U.S. posture with regard to the evolving global S&T landscape, and (3) developing a BGST engagement strategy. The letter portion of the report summarizes activities of the board in its first year, and also describes some existing approaches to identifying and/or benchmarking emerging technologies globally. It is followed by 5 appendixes which include three experimental examples of a qualitative approach to benchmarking, and brief descriptions of programs that are part of the National Academies complex, with which BGST has cooperated.

Click HERE to freely download this report.

Shifting Power: Data Analytics and the Smart Energy Grid (2010)

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On August 23-24, 2010, BGST hosted an "Experts meeting on Data Analytics and the Smart Energy Grid" that brought together scientists and engineers from major research universities, private industry representatives, with government officials to discuss the impact of large, complex, and distributed datasets and associated computational techniques on the future smart energy grid.  The meeting was co-hosted by Microsoft in Redmond, Washington. The experts’ meeting, “Shifting Power: Smart Energy Grid 2020”, explored three concurrent power “shifts”. First, the decision-making regarding energy choices (e.g., what kind of energy, peak v. non-peak usage, the consumer ‘selling’ energy back to the grid) that will shift from the power company to a dynamic relationship among the users, distributors and the companies generating power. Second, the increase in demand for energy is shifting from fossil fuels to a combination of fossil fuels and renewable forms of energy, and thus increasing the importance of “lifecycle” analysis to support investment decisions. These first two shifts require a third: the transition from an operator-dependent grid to one that can think for itself. The SEG will have to get ‘smarter’ to manage the influx of these massive amounts of different kinds of data and data flows (e.g., distributed and streaming).

Click HERE to freely download this report.
Workshop Planning Committee Members: Ruth David (Chair, Analytic Services Inc.), Francine Berman (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Daniel Kammen (University of California, Berkeley), Bernard Meyerson (IBM Corp.), Daniel Reed (University of Iowa), and David Rejeski (Woodrow Wilson Center).

National Academies Staff: Patricia Wrightson (lead staffer), Ethan Chiang, and Neeraj Gorkhaly.

 

  

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