September 17, 2014



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Key Computer Science and Telecommunications Board Reports By Topic

Computer Science Research Impacts and Future Directions

Continuing Innovation in Information Technology examines important research areas and some of the significant, billion-dollar-plus, IT industries that have resulted from those investments.  It features an updated visualization of the impact of research on IT innovation, including the links to U.S. IT firms and products, and explains the critical role of federal support and the interplay between academic and industrial research.

The Future of Computing Performance: Game Over or Next Level? (2010) explores the causes and implications of the slowdown in the historically dramatic exponential growth in computing performance and the end of the dominance of the single microprocessor in computing. The report observes that the era of sequential computing must give way to a new era in which parallelism is at the forefront. The report concludes that important scientific and engineering challenges lie ahead and makes recommendations for research, practice, and education.

Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense (2010) assesses the growing importance of software for national security and examines how the U.S. Department of Defense can most effectively meet its future software needs.

Biometric Recognition: Challenges and Opportunities (2010)  presents a broad and comprehensive assessment of biometric recognition systems -- articulating design and operational considerations as well as outlining a research agenda to bolster the scientific and engineering underpinnings of these systems.

Report of a Workshop on The Scope and Nature of Computational Thinking (2009) discusses what "computational thinking for everyone" might mean and its cognitive and educational implications.

Assessing the Impacts of Changes in the Information Technology R&D Ecosystem: Retaining Leadership in an Increasingly Global Environment (2009) examines changes in the IT R&D ecosystem over the past decade and makes recommendations to strengthen the effectiveness and impact of federally funded information technology research; for the U.S. to remain the strongest generator of and magnet for technical talent; to reduce friction that harms the effectiveness of the U.S. IT R&D ecosystem; and to ensure that the U.S. has a communications, computing, and applications infrastructure which enables U.S. IT users and innovators to lead the world.

Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field (2004) provides a concise characterization of key ideas that lie at the core of CS research together with two dozen essays on diverse aspects of CS research and what motivates and excites CS researchers.

Innovation in Information Technology (2003) builds on several CSTB reports to explain the what and why of information technology (IT) research and provides an update to the "tire tracks" diagram first published in Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation's Information Infrastructure (1995), which depicts the critical role that university research has played in the development of many billion-dollar IT industries.

Funding a Revolution: Government Support for Computing Research (1999) reviews the history of innovation in computing and related communications technologies, identifying factors contributing to the nation's success in the field, illuminating the role of the federal government in funding computer research, and relating government support to developments in the private sector.

Computing the Future: A Broader Agenda for Computer Science and Engineering (1992) provides a comprehensive examination of computer science and engineering as a discipline.

Research Agendas/Directions in Subfields of Computer Science

Computing Research for Sustainability (2012) highlights opportunities for computer science research and IT innovation and urges the computing research community to bring its approaches and methodologies to bear in ways that will have significant, measurable impact on sustainability.

Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Summary of a Workshop on Current Knowledge and Research Gaps (2011) reviews the extensive body of knowledge about the public response to alerts and warnings and the challenges and open research questions associated with their delivery using cell phones and other new technologies.

Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense (2010) assesses the growing importance of software for national security and examines how the U.S. Department of Defense can most effectively meet its future software needs.

Toward Better Usability, Security, and Privacy of Information Technology (2010) identifies research opportunities and ways to embed usability considerations in design and development related to security and privacy, and vice versa.

Letter Report from the Committee on Deterring Cyberattacks: Informing Strategies and Developing Options for U.S. Policy (2009) is the first phase of a larger project to conduct a broad, multidisciplinary examination of deterrence strategies and their possible utility to the U.S. government in its policies toward preventing cyberattacks. This first phase identifies the key issues and questions that merit examination.

Computational Technology for Effective Health Care: Immediate Steps and Strategic Directions (2009) finds that current national health care IT deployment efforts will not be sufficient to achieve the vision of 21st century health care, and calls for greater emphasis by computer science and health/biomedical informatics researchers on providing cognitive support for health care providers, patients, and family caregivers.

Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace (2007) explores the nature of online threats, considers some of the reasons why past research for improving cybersecurity has had less impact than anticipated, and offers a strategy for future research aimed at countering cyber attacks.

Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research (2006) examines telecommunications research in industry and academia, discusses the implications for the health of the sector, and recommends ways to enhance U.S. telecommunications research efforts.

Catalyzing Inquiry at the Interface of Computing and Biology (2005) provides a high-level intellectual structure for Federal agencies supporting work at the biology/computing interface, and seeks to establish the intellectual legitimacy of a fundamentally cross-disciplinary collaboration between biologists and computer scientists.

Getting up to Speed: The Future of Supercomputing (2004) examines U.S. needs for supercomputing and recommends a long-term strategy for government support of high-performance computing research and development.

Beyond Productivity: Information Technology, Innovation, and Creativity (2003) explores the intersections of IT, the arts, and design, examining new kinds of research and a variety of institutional support issues.

Information Technology Research, Innovation, and E-Government (2002) discusses areas where government is a "demand leader" for information technology, explores the roles of IT researchers in e-government innovation, and discusses approaches that can help accelerate innovation and foster the transition of innovative technologies from the lab to operational systems.

Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers (2001) examines the implications of heterogeneous, sensor-rich computational and communications devices embedded throughout the environment and describes the research necessary to achieve robust, scalable, networked, embedded computing systems.

Trust in Cyberspace (1999) provides an assessment of the state of the art procedures for building trustworthy networked information systems; proposes directions for research in computer and network security, software technology, and system architecture; and assesses current technical and market trends in order to better inform public policy as to where progress is likely and where incentives could help.

Cybersecurity and Information System Trustworthiness

At the Nexus of Cybersecurity and Public Policy: Some Basic Concepts and Issues (2014) presents fundamental concepts and principles that serve as points of departure for understanding specific cybersecurity incidents or proposals to improve security.

Professionalizing the Nation’s Cybersecurity Workforce? Criteria for Decision-Making (2013) considers the role that professionalization could play in enhancing workforce capacity and capability and sets forth criteria for when, where, and how to professionalize the cybersecurity workforce.

Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense (2010) assesses the growing importance of software for national security and examines how the U.S. Department of Defense can most effectively meet its future software needs.

Proceedings of a Workshop on Deterring Cyberattacks: Informing Strategies and Developing Options (2010) examines governmental, economical, technical, legal, and psychological challenges involved in deterring cyber attacks.

Biometric Recognition: Challenges and Opportunities (2010)  presents a broad and comprehensive assessment of biometric recognition systems -- articulating design and operational considerations as well as outlining a research agenda to bolster the scientific and engineering underpinnings of these systems.

Toward Better Usability, Security, and Privacy of Information Technology (2010) identifies research opportunities and ways to embed usability considerations in design and development related to security and privacy, and vice versa.

Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities (2009) concludes that although cyberattack capabilities are an important asset for the United States, the current policy and legal framework for their use is ill-formed, undeveloped, and highly uncertain and that U.S. policy should be informed by an open and public national debate on technological, policy, legal, and ethical issues they pose.

Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace (2007) explores the nature of online threats, considers some of the reasons why past research for improving cybersecurity has had less impact than anticipated, and offers a strategy for future research aimed at countering cyber attacks.

 Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy (2003) describes and examines issues, concepts, and techniques for authentication from the perspective of how they implicate privacy—and how adverse impacts on privacy might be contained.

Critical Information Infrastructure Protection and the Law: An Overview of Key Issues (2003) discusses antitrust, FOIA, and liability as factors in protecting critical information infrastructure, given technical and economic conditions.

Cybersecurity Today and Tomorrow: Pay Now or Pay Later (2002) Recaps highlights from past CSTB security reports with a focus on issue identification and practical guidance.

Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges (1999) addresses the intersecting arenas of security, interoperability, and DOD culture and processes as they relate to challenges in command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence.

Trust in Cyberspace (1999) provides an assessment of the state of the art procedures for building trustworthy networked information systems; proposes directions for research in computer and network security, software technology, and system architecture; and assesses current technical and market trends in order to better inform public policy as to where progress is likely and where incentives could help.

Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society (1996) describes the growing importance of encryption, relating a government interests to interests in the spread and control of encryption, and recommends policy changes.

Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age (1991), an enduring primer for information security, explains key concepts and terms, outlines the technology and procedures that give rise to and can alleviate security problems, relates security to complementary concerns such as privacy and safety, and describes the private and public sector institutional contexts.

Software and Information Systems at Scale

Continuing Innovation in Information Technology (2012) examines important research areas and some of the significant, billion-dollar-plus, IT industries that have resulted from those investments.  It features an updated visualization of the impact of research on IT innovation, including the links to U.S. IT firms and products, and explains the critical role of federal support and the interplay between academic and industrial research.

Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense (2010) assesses the growing importance of software for national security and examines how the U.S. Department of Defense can most effectively meet its future software needs.

Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence? (2007) discusses the meaning of dependability in a software and systems context, illustrates how the growing use and complexity of software necessitates a different approach to ensuring dependability, and recommends an evidence-based approach to achieving justifiable confidence in and greater dependability of software.

Getting Up to Speed: The Future of Supercomputing (2004) examines U.S. needs for supercomputing and recommends a long-term strategy for government support of high-performance computing research and development. The report concludes that the demands for supercomputing to strengthen U.S. defense and national security cannot be satisfied with current policies and levels of spending. The federal government should provide stable, long-term funding and support multiple supercomputing hardware and software vendors in order to give scientists and policy-makers better tools to solve problems in areas such as intelligence, nuclear stockpile stewardship, and climate change.

Information Technology Research, Innovation, and E-Government (2002) examines a number of broad technical areas where government investment in IT research will likely have an impact on the creation of advanced e-government capability, including, for example, information infrastructure, information management, middleware, human-system interfaces, privacy and security, and software technologies.

Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers (2001) explores the potential of networked systems of embedded computers and the research challenges arising from embedding computation and communications technology into a multitude of arenas. It describes the many ways in which these emerging networks operate under unique constraints not present in more traditional distributed systems such as the Internet. A comprehensive, systems-oriented research agenda is presented along with recommendations to major federal funding agencies.

Trust in Cyberspace (1999) provides an assessment of the state of the art procedures for building trustworthy networked information systems; proposes directions for research in computer and network security, software technology, and system architecture; and assesses current technical and market trends in order to better inform public policy as to where progress is likely and where incentives could help.

Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental  Challenges (1999) identifies challenges to the full DOD's full exploitation of C4I technology information systems, details principles by which to assess DOD efforts in these areas over the long term, and provides specific, more immediately actionable recommendations. Although DOD is the focus of this book, the principles and issues presented are also relevant to interoperability, architecture, and security challenges faced by government as a whole and by large, complex public and private enterprises across the economy.

Information Technology and National and Homeland Security

Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense (2010) assesses the growing importance of software for national security and examines how the U.S. Department of Defense can most effectively meet its future software needs.

Biometric Recognition: Challenges and Opportunities (2010)  presents a broad and comprehensive assessment of biometric recognition systems -- articulating design and operational considerations as well as outlining a research agenda to bolster the scientific and engineering underpinnings of these systems.

Proceedings of a Workshop on Deterring Cyberattacks: Informing Strategies and Developing Options (2010) examines governmental, economical, technical, legal, and psychological challenges involved in deterring cyber attacks.

Achieving Effective Acquisition of Information Technology in the Department of Defense (2010) calls for the DOD to acquire information technology systems using a fundamentally different acquisition process based on iterative, incremental development practices.

Protecting Individual Privacy in the Struggle Against Terrorists: A Framework for Assessment (2008) calls for U.S. agencies with counterterrorism programs that collect or "mine" personal data to evaluate the programs' effectiveness, lawfulness, and impacts on privacy, offers a framework agencies can use to evaluate programs, and urges Congress to reexamine current law to consider how agencies can use data.

Preliminary Observations on DoD Software Research Needs and Priorities: A Letter Report (2008) considers the critical role of defense software, industry’s ability to meet DoD’s future software needs, potential contributions of academic researchers, and technology areas where DoD has leading demand.

Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities (2003) examines issues and options for developing IT useful in countering terrorism in the short and long terms are outlined, building on CSTB’s chapter in the National Academies' report, Making the Nation Safer, with additional attention to information fusion and the human element in mechanism design and use.

Critical Information Infrastructure Protection and the Law: An Overview of Key Issues (2003) discusses antitrust, FOIA, and liability as factors in protecting critical information infrastructure, given technical and economic conditions.

The Internet Under Crisis Conditions: Learning from September 11 (2002) presents an assessment of how the Internet fared on September 11, 2001, lessons learned, and how the Internet might play a greater role in responding to future crises, combining descriptions and data with guidance for research and action.

IDs -- Not That Easy: Questions About Nationwide Identity Systems (2002) outlines challenging policy, process, and technological issues presented by nationwide identity systems.

Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges (1999) addresses the intersecting arenas of security, interoperability, and DOD culture and processes as they relate to challenges in command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence.

Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society (1996) describes the growing importance of encryption, relating a government interests to interests in the spread and control of encryption, and recommends policy changes.

Information Technology and Privacy

Toward Better Usability, Security, and Privacy of Information Technology (2010) identifies research opportunities and ways to embed usability considerations in design and development related to security and privacy, and vice versa.

Protecting Individual Privacy in the Struggle Against Terrorists: A Framework for Assessment (2008) calls for U.S. agencies with counterterrorism programs that collect or "mine" personal data to evaluate the programs' effectiveness, lawfulness, and impacts on privacy, offers a framework agencies can use to evaluate programs, and urges Congress to reexamine current law to consider how agencies can use data.

Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age (2007) examines ongoing IT trends, how threats to privacy are evolving, and how society can balance the interests of individuals, businesses, and government in ways that promote privacy reasonably and efficiently.

Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy (2003) describes and examines issues, concepts, and techniques for authentication from the perspective of how they implicate privacy—and how adverse impacts on privacy might be contained.

Information Technology and Broad Public Policy Issues

Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy Options (2011) describes key technology trends, their implications, and options for facilitating the introduction of enhanced and new services.

State Voter Registration Databases: Immediate Actions and Future Improvements (2008) outlines various challenges to the deployment of state voter registration databases, as mandated by the Help America Vote Act of 2002, and describes both short-term and longer-term solutions to these challenges.

Asking the Right Questions About Electronic Voting (2005) articulates important questions and issues that election officials, policy makers, and informed citizens should ask concerning the use of computers and information technology in the electoral process.

Youth, Pornography and the Internet (2002) explores comprehensively the many issues associated with various options for protecting children from inappropriate sexually explicit material on the Internet, laying a foundation for a more coherent and objective national debate on the subject.

The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age (2000) discusses the complex labyrinth of technology, law, economics, social science, and public policy that shapes digital intellectual property, with an emphasis on copyright.

The Internet

Signposts in Cyberspace: The Domain Name System and Internet Navigation (2005) examines the performance and prospects of the Domain Name System from technical and institutional perspectives, and also looks at how navigation technologies and institutions facilitate finding and accessing Internet resources. It describes the evolution of the technologies and institutions that have supported the growth of the Internet and provides the basis for future decisions that will enable its productive evolution.

The Internet Under Crisis Conditions: Learning from September 11 (2002) presents an assessment of how the Internet fared on September 11, 2001, lessons learned, and how the Internet might play a greater role in responding to future crises, combining descriptions and data with guidance for research and action.

Youth, Pornography and the Internet (2002) explores comprehensively the many issues associated with various options for protecting children from inappropriate sexually explicit material on the Internet, laying a foundation for a more coherent and objective national debate on the subject.

The Internet's Coming of Age (2001) characterizes the Internet at the beginning of the 21st century, focusing on the evolution of key technical and business trends, relating those trends to broader social and economic concerns, and illuminating areas where public policy may become more important.

Use and Management of Information Technology in Government

Interim Report of a Review of the Next Generation Air Transportation System Enterprise Architecture, Software, Safety, and Human Factors (2014) discusses issues and questions that the study committee will be exploring as it develops its final report.

Strategies and Priorities for Information Technology at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (2011) recommends that CMS embrace IT as a critical strategic capability for improving the efficiency, quality, safety, and equity of U.S. health care.

Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense (2010) assesses the growing importance of software for national security and examines how the U.S. Department of Defense can most effectively meet its future software needs.

Achieving Effective Acquisition of Information Technology in the Department of Defense (2010) calls for the DOD to acquire information technology systems using a fundamentally different acquisition process based on iterative, incremental development practices.

Improving State Voter Registration Databases (2009) outlines ways that states can improve their voter registration databases and enhance information sharing within and among states, including short-term improvements to voter education, dissemination of information, and administrative processes and long-term improvements to data collection and entry, matching procedures, and privacy and security.

Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment (2007) examines the SSA’s proposed e-government strategy and recommends how the SSA can best deliver services to its user communities in the future.

Building an Electronic Records Archive at NARA: Recommendations for a Long-Term Strategy (2005) examines several important long-term issues in archiving electronic records, including coping with technological change, reengineering archival processes for electronic records, partnering with other institutions, broadening research interactions, and assuring record integrity and authenticity.

A Review of the FBI's Trilogy IT Modernization Program (2004) addresses architectural, technical, and management issues related to the bureau's Trilogy program. Letter Report on the FBI's Trilogy IT Modernization Program responded to updated information about recent activities at the FBI.

Information Technology Research, Innovation, and E-Government (2002) discusses areas where government is a "demand leader" for information technology, explores the roles of IT researchers in e-government innovation, and discusses approaches that can help accelerate innovation and foster the transition of innovative technologies from the lab to operational systems.

LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress (2001) combines attention to the internal needs to modernize IT systems at the Library of Congress with attention to the larger contexts of publishing, copyright, and digital information.

Information Technology, Disaster Management, and Emergency Response

Public Response to Alerts and Warnings Using Social Media: Summary of a Workshop on Current Knowledge and Research Gaps (2013) reviews current knowledge about  public response to alerts and warnings and explores the challenges and open research questions associated with their delivery using social media, how officials may monitor social media information, and the associated privacy concerns

Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Summary of a Workshop on Current Knowledge and Research Gaps (2011) reviews the extensive body of knowledge about the public response to alerts and warnings and the challenges and open research questions associated with their delivery using cell phones and other new technologies.

Improving Disaster Management: The Role of IT in Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery (2007) examines IT’s as-yet unrealized potential to improve how communities and the nation handle disasters and describes payoffs for disaster management that include more robust and interoperable communications, improved situational awareness and decision support, greater organizational agility, and enhanced engagement of the public.

The Internet Under Crisis Conditions: Learning from September 11 (2002) presents an assessment of how the Internet fared on September 11, 2001, lessons learned, and how the Internet might play a greater role in responding to future crises, combining descriptions and data with guidance for research and action.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


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