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Sunday, April 20, 2014 
People
People

Welcome to the Committee on Population!

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   CPOP - TOPICS
 
Upcoming Events

Advances in Biodemography:
Cross-Species Comparisons of Social Environments, Social Behaviors, and their Effects on Health and Longevity

April 8-9, 2014
Keck Center
500 5th Street, NW

Workshop Agenda  |  More Information

Please RSVP if attending.

Recent Events
The Integration of Immigrants into American Society

A new Committee is investigating what we know about the integration of immigrants into American society; discuss implications for informing various policy options; and identify important gaps in the research. The first meeting of this committee was held in January.

Sponsors: Carnegie Corporation of New York, Russell Sage Foundation, National Science Foundation, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service, President’s Committee of the National Academies.


Planning Meeting on "Trends in Educational Outcomes in the United States: Causes and Consequences from an International Perspective"

The Committee on Population (CPOP) and the Board on Testing Assessment (BOTA) at the National Research Council held a half-day planning meeting on trends in educational outcomes in the United States. This planning meeting brought together U.S. and international subject matter experts to help establish a specific scope of work and an overall plan for a consensus study.

More Information


Workshop on Determinants of Premature Mortality

This workshop focused on updating the classification of the determinants of the real causes of premature death in the United States and reviewed previous work in the field in light of new data generated since the release of US Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health and Explaining Divergent Levels of Longevity in High-Income Countries.

More Information

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Shorter Lives, Poorer Health

The spring issue of Issues in Science and Technology featured an article by CPOP director Tom Plewes that was based on the recently published report U.S. Health in International Perspective.

Read the article
 
 

 

Recently_Released
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New Directions in the Sociology of Aging

This new report explores the causes, consequences and implications of demographic, economic and social changes that are vital to the development of sound social policy for an aging population. The report evaluates the recent contributions of social demography, social epidemiology, and sociology to the study of aging and identifies promising new research directions in these subfields.

More Information


SocialMobilitycoverLDeveloping New National Data on Social Mobility: A Workshop Summary

This new report from the Committee on National Statistics and the Committee on Population summarizes a workshop convened in June 2013 to consider options for designing a new national survey on social mobility that would provide the first definitive evidence on recent and long-term trends in social mobility.

More Information

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U.S. Health in International Perspective

Although the United States spends more on health care than any other nation, a growing body of research shows that Americans are in poorer health and live shorter lives than people in many other high-income countries. The new report, U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health, synthesizes available research taking an in-depth look at this disadvantage in health and lifespan.

 

Read moreReport Brief 
View the video of the public briefing


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Aging and the Macroeconomy

In the next four decades, people aged 65 and over will make up an increasingly large percentage of the population.  The resulting demographic shift will have broad economic consequences for the U.S., says the report Aging and the Macroeconomy: Long-Term Implications of an Older Population. The long term effects on all generations will be mediated by how the nation responds and how quickly.

 

Read more Report Brief

 

Co-Chair, Ron Lee's Presentation on this report

 

 

 

 
The National Academies