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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Board on Children Youth and  Families
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth
Webinar Series
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Over the past several decades, research has fundamentally changed our understanding of how adolescents—young people ages 10 to 25—develop, grow, and learn. Changes in brain structure and function (such as the strengthening of connections within and between brain regions and the pruning away of unused connections) that occur during adolescence affords young people a remarkable capacity to learn, adapt to changes, and explore their own creativity. Adolescent brains are uniquely fit to meet the needs of this stage of life, allowing them to explore new environments and build new relationships with the world and people around them.

But what does our new understanding mean for society? How can we create the kinds of settings and supports that allow adolescents to thrive and make meaningful contributions to the world around them?

The Promise of Adolescence, a recent report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, examines the neurobiological and socio-behavioral science of adolescent development and identifies how these findings can be applied to four key sectors: health, education, justice, and child welfare. This webinar series, based on the report, will discuss how systems can apply this science and capture the opportunity of this developmental period. Webinar presenters will discuss recent advances in adolescent development science and the opportunities for implementing developmentally-informed practices within each sector. Practitioners, advocates, researchers, parents, and adolescents are encouraged to register.

To learn more about the report, visit the project webpage. For questions, email Dara Shefska.

Sponsors: Funders for Adolescent Science Translation, including the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Bezos Foundation, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the Ford Foundation, the Hilton Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the National Public Education Support Fund.




Justice Webinar
| Wednesday, January 29, 2020 at 2PM ET

Our understanding of adolescence has fundamentally changed over the past several decades. New research highlights the diminished culpability of adolescent offenders and their potential responsiveness to preventive interventions based on evidence-based risk- and needs-assessments. Our new understanding creates an opportunity to reimagine and redesign the systems and policies that affect adolescents involved in the justice system.

In this webinar, we will explore the ways in which the justice sector—including the juvenile and criminal justice systems—can better incorporate new understandings of adolescent development into their practices and policies. Two members of the expert committee that authored The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth, Beth Cauffman (University of California, Irvine) and Susan Mangold (Juvenile Law Center) will explore adolescent development science and opportunities for continued reform in the justice sector. Practitioners, advocates, researchers, parents, and adolescents are encouraged to register.
Contact Dara Shefska with questions.

Speakers:
 
Cauffman   Mangold
Beth Cauffman
University of California, Irvine
 Susan Mangold
Juvenile Law Center
    
Register Here
Justice Brief



Child Welfare Webinar
| Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 1PM ET  

Our understanding of adolescence has fundamentally changed over the past several decades. New insights from research reveal how changes in brain structure and function (such as the strengthening of connections within and between brain regions and the pruning away of unused connections) that occur during adolescence afford young people a remarkable capacity to learn, adapt to changes, and explore their own creativity.

But this understanding is not reflected in the current structure of the child welfare system, which was primarily designed to meet the needs of younger children. Adolescents’ more advanced developmental needs and abilities are not fully incorporated in the system’s aims and methods. Moreover, there are disparities within the child welfare system, with poor children and children of color being disproportionally referred to the child welfare system.

In this webinar, two members of the expert committee that authored The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth, Leslie Leve (University of Oregon) and Susan Mangold (Juvenile Law Center) will explore adolescent development science and opportunities for continued reform in the child welfare system. Practitioners, advocates, researchers, parents, and adolescents are encouraged to register.

Speakers:

 Leve  Mangold
Leslie Leve
University of Oregon
 Susan Mangold
Juvenile Law Center


Register Here
Child Welfare Brief



Health Webinar | Thursday, March 26, 2020 at 1PM ET 

Adolescence—the developmental period that spans ages 10 through 25—is a period of growth and learning that provides opportunities for lifelong impact. Access to appropriate health care services is important for adolescents, both to ensure their well-being today, as they experience the bumps and stresses of adolescent life, and to ensure their well-being for a lifetime by addressing behaviors that impact their long-term health, such as diet, exercise, and substance use. Yet many adolescents – particularly ethnic and racial minority adolescents – face a variety of barriers to accessing health care, such as financial barriers, privacy concerns, and long wait times. In addition, many of the health issues adolescents confront are rooted in the social determinants of health (e.g., income, physical environment, housing, etc.) and driven by underlying social and economic inequalities.

This webinar will explore the opportunities for creating an adolescent-friendly health care system. Two members of the expert committee that authored The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth, Claire Brindis (University of California, San Francisco) and Stephen Russell (University of Texas at Austin) will discuss recent advances in our understanding of adolescence and opportunities for applying them to support the health of all young people. Practitioners, advocates, researchers, parents, and adolescents are encouraged to register.

Speakers:

Brindis   Russell
Claire Brindis
University of California, San Francisco
 Stephen Russell
University of Texas at Austin

Register Here
Health Brief



Education Webinar | April/May 2020 TBD 

Our understanding of adolescence has fundamentally changed over the past several decades. New insights from research reveal how changes in brain structure and function (such as the strengthening of connections within and between brain regions and the pruning away of unused connections) that occur during adolescence afford young people a remarkable capacity to learn, adapt to changes, and explore their own creativity.

But this understanding is not reflected in the current structure of the U.S. education system, which was largely designed for an earlier era. Schools must broaden their missions to meet the needs of modern adolescents. This will require schools to become more culturally competent (meaning understanding differences in background and building on adolescents’ varying strengths), to emphasize non-academic skill building (like developing strong interpersonal skills), and to help young people navigate numerous educational and career opportunities. The secondary school system of the future must meet teens “where they are” and offer differentiated and responsive academic opportunities, including individualized instruction, tutoring, and credentialing.

This webinar will explore recent scientific advances in our understanding of adolescent development as well as promising strategies for building the education system of the future. Teachers, administrators, researchers, advocates, parents, and students are encouraged to register.

Register Here - coming soon
Education Brief



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