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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on National Statistics
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

 

Robert M. Groves (chair), Department of Mathematics and Statistics and Department of Sociology, Georgetown University

Mary Ellen Bock, Department of Statistics, Purdue University
Anne C. Case, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University
Michael E. Chernew, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School
Janet Currie, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University
Donald A. Dillman, Department of Sociology, Washington State University
Diana Farrell, JPMorgan Chase Institute, Washington, D.C.
Daniel Kifer, Department of Computer Science & Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University

Thomas L. Mesenbourg, Retired, Formerly U.S. Census Bureau
Sarah M. Nusser, Department of Statistics, Center for Survey Statistics and Methodology, Iowa State University

Colm A. O'Muircheartaigh, Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, The University of Chicago
Jerome P. Reiter, Department of Statistical Science, Duke University
Roberto Rigobon, Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Judith A. Seltzer, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles

C. Matthew Snipp, School of the Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University

 

 
Robert M. Groves (NAS/NAM) is executive vice president and provost of Georgetown University, where he is also the Gerard J. Campbell professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and a professor in the Department of Sociology. Prior to joining Georgetown as provost, he served as director of the U.S. Census Bureau from 2009 to 2012 after being appointed by President Barack Obama. Previously, he was director of the University of Michigan Survey Research Center and research professor at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. He also served as associate director for research and methodology of the U.S. Census Bureau from 1990 to 1992. His research focuses on the effects of the mode of data collection on responses in sample surveys, the social and political influences on survey participation, the use of adaptive research designs to improve the cost and error properties of statistics, and how public concerns about privacy affect attitudes toward statistical agencies. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in the Social and Political Sciences Section and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) in the Social Sciences, Humanities and Law Section. He served as a member of CNSTAT from 2000 to 2006, as a member of DBASSE from 2014 to 2016, and has served on numerous Academies boards, panels, and committees, including chair of the Panel to Review Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS); member of the Committee on Revisions to the Common Rule for the Protection of Human Subjects in Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences: A Workshop; and the Workshop Steering Committee on Enhancing Research and Development for the Federal Statistical System, among others. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has an A.B. in sociology from Dartmouth College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

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Mary Ellen Bock is a professor of statistics at Purdue University. Her current research interests include bioinformatics and biologically related disciplines (genomics, nutrition, proteomics), massive data and additive manufacturing. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Statistical Association. She is a past president of the American Statistical Association. She has been elected to offices in the Mathematics Section and in the Statistics Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has previously served on the Panel for Information Technology, Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications, U.S. National Committee for Mathematics, Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics, and Panel for Computing and Applied Mathematics. Dr. Bock received a B.A. in German and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
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Anne C. Case (NAM) is the Alexander Stewart 1886 professor of economics and public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Economics Department at Princeton University. She is also the director of the research program in development studies and a faculty fellow in two research centers sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School: the Center for Health and Wellbeing and the Office of Population Research. Her main research interests are in microeconomic foundations of development, health, and economics of the family. She served on the Academies’ Committee on Population (CPOP) in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education from 2005 to 2008. She is currently serving as an external member of the World Bank’s research committee; a member of the UNAIDS Economic Reference Group; an affiliate of the Southern African Labour and Development Research Unit at the University of Cape Town; and a visiting scientist at the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies. She is an elected member of the  National Academy of Medicine (NAM) in the Social Sciences, Humanities, and Law Section. She is also an elected member of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has a B.S. from the State University of New York, Albany, an M.P.A. from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

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Michael E. Chernew (NAM) is a professor of health care policy in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. His research examines several areas related to controlling health care spending growth while maintaining or improving the quality of care. His research activities have focused on several areas, most notably the causes and consequences of growth in health care expenditures. Much of his most recent work has focused on designing and evaluating Value Based Insurance Design (VBID) packages that attempt to minimize financial barriers to high value health care services and simultaneously reduce costs, and his ongoing work explores geographic variation in spending and spending growth. Several large companies have adopted these approaches, and Dr. Chernew’s ongoing work includes evaluations and design of such programs. His work on payment reform involves evaluation of bundled payment initiatives, including global payment models that include pay-for-performance components. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) in Social Sciences, Humanities and Law Section. He is the co-editor of the American Journal of Managed Care and senior associate editor of Health Services Research. He is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), which is an independent agency established to advise the U.S. Congress on issues affecting the Medicare program, a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Health Advisors, and a member of the Commonwealth Foundation’s Commission on a High Performance Health Care System. In 2000, 2004 and 2010, he served on technical advisory panels for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that reviewed the assumptions used by the Medicare actuaries to assess the financial status of the Medicare trust funds. On the panels, Dr. Chernew focused on the methodology used to project trends in long-term health care cost growth. In 1998, he was awarded the John D. Thompson Prize for Young Investigators by the Association of University Programs in Public Health. In 1999, he received the Alice S. Hersh Young Investigator Award from the Association of Health Services Research. He has an A.B. and B.S. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. 

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Janet Currie (NAM) is the Henry Putnam professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Well Being. Her research focuses on the impact of government policies and poverty on the health and well-being of children over their life cycle. She has written about early intervention programs and expansions of the Medicaid program, public housing, and food and nutrition programs. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in child health and environmental threats to children's health. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) in the Social Sciences, Humanities and Law Section, a position she was elected to in 2013. She served on the Board on Children, Youth and Families from 2012 to 2014 and the Committee on Population from 2001 to 2004, and has served on several Academies committees on the promotion of well-being of children and families. She is currently on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science magazine and the editorial board of the Quarterly Journal of Economics. She has been elected to membership positions in numerous professional associations, including member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; member of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences; and a fellow of the Econometric Society. She served as both president (2014-15) and vice president (2013-14) of the Society of Labor Economists, and served as vice president of the American Economic Association (2010). She has a B.A. and M.A. in economics from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.
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Donald A. Dillman is Regents professor in the Department of Sociology at Washington State University. He also serves as the deputy director for research and development in the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center at Washington State University. From 1991 to 1995, he served as the senior survey methodologist in the Office of the Director at the U.S. Census Bureau. In 2000, he received the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics for his work at the Census Bureau. He is recognized internationally as a major contributor to the development of modern mail, telephone, and internet survey methods. Throughout his time at Washington State University, he has maintained an active research program on the improvement of survey methods and how information technologies influence rural development. He has served as investigator on more than 80 grants and contracts worth approximately $12.5 million, and written 13 books and more than 235 other publications. He holds numerous memberships in professional organizations, including the American Sociological Association, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Statistical Association. He served as past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the Rural Sociological Society. He chaired the Academies Panel on Redesigning the BLS Consumer Expenditures Surveys; served as a member of the Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Building and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys; the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census; and the Survey of Earned Doctorates Advisory Panel. He has a B.A. in agronomy, an M.S. in rural sociology, and a Ph.D. in sociology, all from Iowa State University. 
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Diana Farrell is the founding president and chief executive officer of the JPMorgan Chase Institute. Previously, she was the global head of the McKinsey Center for Government, providing research, proprietary data and other tools to support government leaders focused on improving performance. In addition, she was a leader of McKinsey’s Global Public Sector Practice and a member of their Partner Review Committee. She served in the White House as deputy director of the National Economic Council and deputy assistant to the President on Economic Policy from 2009-2011. During her tenure, she led interagency processes and stakeholder management on a broad portfolio of economic initiatives, including financial reform, housing and innovation. She also coordinated stakeholder engagement around the passage of the historic Dodd-Frank Act and served as a member of the President’s Auto Recovery Task Force. Prior to serving in the Obama Administration, she was the head of the McKinsey Global Institute. Under her leadership, the Institute published extensively on the topics of productivity; competitiveness and growth; global financial system evolution and capital market developments; labor markets; healthcare systems; and energy. Ms. Farrell earned an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

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Daniel Kifer is associate professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and a member of the graduate faculty in the Social Data Analytics Department at The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Kifer’s research interests include statistical privacy, machine learning, computational social science, and deep learning. He has won an influential paper award at the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering and has developed some of the disclosure avoidance techniques used by the U.S. Census Bureau. His research has been supported by NSF, Google, Xerox, NVIDIA, Adobe, and Yahoo. Dr. Kifer has a Ph.D. from Cornell University.
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Thomas L. Mesenbourg retired as acting director of the U.S. Census Bureau in August 2013. He served as deputy director from May 2008-August 2012. Before being named deputy director, he was associate director for economic programs, with responsibility for the Economic Directorate’s myriad programs, including the Economic Census and the Census of Governments and over 100 monthly, quarterly, and annual surveys. He joined the Census Bureau in 1972. In 2004, he received a Presidential Rank Award for Distinguished Senior Executives, government’s highest award for career executives. In October 2012, Mr. Mesenbourg received the Roger W. Jones Award from American University for exceptional leadership among people who devoted themselves to federal public service, and in 2011 he received the Julius Shiskin Award for economic statistics. He has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Boston University and an M.A. in economics from Pennsylvania State University.
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Sarah M. Nusser is vice president for research and professor in the Department of Statistics at Iowa State University. She was recently director of the Center for Survey Statistics and Methodology, and she was a senior research fellow at BLS from 2000 to 2001 and a mathematical statistician at USDA NASS in 2011. Her research interests include using geospatial data in survey data collection and estimation, sampling and estimation methods for agricultural and natural resource surveys, and sample design and measurement error in surveys. She is familiar with the American Community Survey and other U.S. Census Bureau surveys through her work with Census Bureau researchers on using geospatial data for address listings and her service on the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. She also has experience with administrative records data bases through research involving welfare program evaluation and numerous operational survey projects. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistics Institute. She serves on the UN Food and Agriculture Global Strategy to Improve Agricultural and Rural Statistics. Her previous Academies committee experience includes the Workshop on the Food Availability Data System and Estimates of Food Loss; the Panel on Redesigning the BLS Consumer Expenditures Surveys; the Panel on Estimating Children Eligible for School Nutrition Programs Using the American Community Survey; and the Committee on Social Security Representative Payees. She has a B.S. in botany from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.S. in botany from North Carolina State University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University. 

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Colm A. O'Muircheartaigh is dean of the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy Studies, professor in the Harris School, and senior fellow in the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). He is one of the nation’s leading experts in the design and implementation of social investigations. An applied statistician, he has focused his research on the design of complex surveys across a wide range of populations and topics, and on fundamental issues of data quality, including the impact of errors in responses to survey questions, cognitive aspects of question wording, and latent variable models for non-response. He joined the Harris School faculty in 1998 from the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he was the first director of the Methodology Institute and a faculty member of the Department of Statistics since 1971. A fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, he has served as a consultant to a wide range of public and commercial organizations around the world, including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the United Nations. He served on the Academies' Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census from 2004 to 2006. He received his undergraduate education at University College Dublin, and his graduate education at the London School of Economics.
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Jerome P. (Jerry) Reiter is professor of statistical science at Duke University. Before joining Duke as an assistant professor, he was a lecturer of statistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, an assistant professor of statistics at Williams College, the interim executive director of the Triangle Research Data Center, and a senior fellow at the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. He participates in both applied and methodological research in statistics, and is most interested in applications involving social science and public policy. His methodological research focuses mainly on data confidentiality, missing data, and survey methodology. He previously served on the CNSTAT Panel on Addressing Priority Technical Issues for the Next Decade of the American Community Survey--First Phase; the TRB Committee on the Long-Term Stewardship of Safety Data from the Second Strategic Highway Research Program; and the CNSTAT-CPOP Panel on Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biological Specimens and Biodata in Social Surveys. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, principal investigator of the Triangle Census Research Network (funded by the National Science Foundation to improve the practice of data dissemination among federal statistical agencies), and deputy director of the Information Initiative at Duke, an institute dedicated to research and applications in the analysis of large-scale (and not large-scale) data. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Duke University, and an A.M. and Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University.
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Roberto Rigobon is the Society of Sloan Fellows professor of management and professor of applied economics at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is also a visiting professor at the Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administración (Institute of Advanced Studies in Administration, IESA) in Venezuela and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Dr. Rigobon is a Venezuelan economist whose areas of research are international economics, monetary economics, and development economics. His research has addressed the causes of balance-of-payments crises, financial crises, and the propagation of them across countries—the phenomenon that has been identified in the literature as contagion. Currently, he is studying the properties of international pricing practices and how to produce alternative measures of inflation. He is one of the two founding members of the Billion Prices Project as well as a co-founder of PriceStats. He is a member of the Census Bureau’s Scientific Advisory Committee and president of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association. He has been an associate editor for the Review of Economics and Statistics, Economia, and Emerging Markets Review, and an editor for Economia Panel. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela), an M.B.A. from IESA, and a Ph.D. in economics from MIT.
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Judith A. Seltzer is professor of sociology and past director of the California Center for Population Research at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. Her research interests include kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonresident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other policies affect family change. She is especially interested in kinship institutions that are in flux, such as marriage and cohabitation in the contemporary United States or divorced and non-marital families. She also explores ways to improve the quality of survey data on families, and in 2013 Seltzer and her colleagues added a module with family rosters to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to provide new data on U.S. family networks. She currently serves on the CNSTAT Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations, and she previously served on the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments, and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. She was president of the Population Association of America in 2016, and she previously served on the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey. She has a B.A. in sociology from Princeton University and both an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.
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C. Matthew Snipp is Burnet C. and Milfred Finley Wohlford professor of sociology at Stanford University. At Stanford, he currently serves as director of the Secure Data Center, deputy director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, and chair of the Native American Studies program. He has written extensively on American Indians, focusing specifically on the interaction of American Indians and the U.S. census. He currently serves on the CNSTAT Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations and the Standing Committee for the American Opportunity Study-Phase 1. Previously, he served as a member of the Panel to Review the 2010 Census, the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, the Panel on the Research on Future Census Methods, and as co-chair of the Steering Committee for a Workshop on Developing a New National Survey on Social Mobility. He has also served on the Census Bureau’s Technical Advisory Committee on Racial and Ethnic Statistics and the Native American Population Advisory Committee. He is the former director of the Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity. Prior to moving to Stanford, he was associate professor and professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he held affiliate appointments with several other units, and assistant and associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland. He has a M.S. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
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