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Committee on the Future of Voting: Accessible, Reliable, Verifiable Technology
4th Meeting
December 7-8, 2017
Denver, CO

Committee on Science, Technology, and Law

35th Meeting
March 15-16, 2018
Pasadena, CA
 

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Committee on Science, Technology, and Law
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Keck Center, Room 570
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: 202 334-1713
Fax: 202 334-2530

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News
Future of Voting - Small Slider
December 11, 2017
EVENT
Fourth Meeting of the Committee on the Future of Voting: Accessible, Reliable, Verifiable Technology
CSTL's Committee on the Future of Voting held its fourth meeting on December 7-8, 2017 in Denver, CO.  Read more.

What's New - Small Slider
November 14, 2017
PUBLICATION
CSTL Chronicle
The latest edition of the CSTL Chronicle, the bi-annual newsletter of the activities, projects, and people of CSTL is available here.

Science Policy Education Modules
June 2016
Publication
Science Policy Decision-Making: Educational Modules
In light of the ever-increasing role that science plays in policy decisions, nine educational modules were developed by an ad hoc CSTL committee to highlight the role of science in decision-making for professional school students, with a particular emphasis on scientific and statistical methods of inference. Each module is designed to elucidate competencies in science and technology that are generalizable across contexts. All are free to download.

DURC Report - Small Slider
September 14, 2017
PUBLICATION
Dual Use Research of Concern
CSTL has just released a new report, Dual Use Research of Concern in the Life Sciences: Current Issues and Controversies. The report examines policies and practices governing dual-use research in the life sciences – research that could potentially be misused to cause harm. Project Information

Future of Voting - Small Slider
October 19, 2017
EVENT
Third Meeting of the Committee on the Future of Voting: Accessible, Reliable, Verifiable Technology
CSTL's Committee on the Future of Voting held its third meeting in Washington, DC on October 18-19, 2017. The morning sessions on October 18 were webcastRead more.

Identifying the Culprit: Assessing Eyewitness Identification
July 25, 2017
Publication
Why Eyewitnesses Fail
In the July 25, 2017 edition of PNAS, Thomas D. Albright, co-chair of the committee that authored our 2014 report Identifying the Culprit: Assessing Eyewitness Identification, discusses the scientific issues that emerged from the study and how the issues led to recommendations for additional research, best practices for law enforcement, and use of eyewitness evidence by the courts.

History and Future of Forensic Science
July 1, 2017
Event
The History and Future of Forensic Science
The Judicial Conference of the District of Columbia Circuit dedicated its June 27-30 meeting to "The History and Future of Forensic Science," highlighting the ground-breaking CSTL reports on forensic science and eyewitness identification as well as the Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence. The conference featured presentations by CSTL members and members of the CSTL study committees that produced these documents.

Committee on the Future of Voting
June 14, 2017
Event
Second Meeting of the Committee on the Future of Voting: Accessible, Reliable, Verifiable Technology
The Committee on the Future of Voting held its second meeting on June 12-13, 2017. The committee is conducting a study to document the current state of play in terms of technology, standards, and resources for voting technologies; examine challenges arising out of the 2016 federal election; evaluate advances in technology currently (and soon to be) available that may improve voting; and offer recommendations that provide a vision of voting that is easier, accessible, reliable, and verifiable.