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August 15, 2017
Jefferson Science Lecture with Dr. Karen Lips
Lecture Series


September 26, 2017
The Role of Advanced Technologies in Structural Engineering for More Resilient Communities
Workshop

December 7-8, 2017
Protecting the Rights of Individuals Fleeing Conflict: The Role of Scientists, Engineers & Health Professionals
Symposium






Media Coverage

DNA ImageInitiative on Human Gene Editing 
(May 2015)






September 26, 2016
Human genome editing
The Japan Times (Opinion)
An international summit on human gene editing held in December in Washington, hosted by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Britain’s Royal Society, issued an statement which pointed out that “permanent genetic ‘enhancements’ to subsets of the population could exacerbate social inequalities or be used coercively.”

September 22, 2016
Report: Scientist the first to edit genes of health human embryos
CBS News
Such experiments led the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to launch the Human Gene-Editing Initiative to discuss the complex safety and ethical issues they raise.

August 17, 2016
Why we should fine-tune the DNA of future generations
Cosmos (Subscription)
…co-hosted by the US National Academy of Sciences and US National Academy of Medicine, the UK Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

July 6, 2016
Obama’s top scientist talks shrinking budgets, Donald Trump, and his biggest regret

Nature
And in fact, when the current round of interest in gene editing emerged with the rise of the CRISPR technology, the [US] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine gathered leading scientists from all over the world in a format very much like Asilomar [a landmark conference in 1975 that set rules for research on recombinant DNA], but strongly inter¬national.

May 4, 2016
Embryology policy: Revisit the 14-day rule
Nature (Opinion)
There are precedents for this type of international discourse. In response to the development of powerful gene-editing technologies such as CRISPR–Cas9, the U.S. National Academy of Science, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, Britain's Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences jointly hosted an international summit in December last year to discuss scientific, ethical and governance issues raised by the research. The second component of this initiative — a science and policy review and report on human gene editing — is ongoing.

May 3, 2016
Pondering ‘what it means to be human’ on the frontier of gene editing
The Washington Post
The 2015 version of Asilomar occurred at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington in December. For three days, scientists from Europe, China and North America discussed CRISPR.

April 28, 2016
China gets into the genetic breakthrough business
CNN
Discussions about these sensitive and controversial issues are taking place at a high level globally, including the recent International Summit on Human Gene Editing, organized by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences and medicine, the Royal Society in London and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

April 4, 2016
Op-ed: Minding our makeup
Varsity
In December 2015, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) held an international summit on Human Gene Editing after the Chinese Academy of Scientists asked for a ban on clinical use of human germ line editing.

March 4, 2016
Apple vs. FBI: The tip of the iceberg as laws can’t keep up with tech

The Washington Post
In Dec. 2015, an international group of scientists gathered at the National Academy of Sciences to call for a moratorium on making inheritable changes to the human genome until there is a “broad societal consensus about the appropriateness” of any proposed change.

March 4, 2016
Legal battles loom as technological ubiquity creates tensions between privacy and security
Tech Crunch
In December 2015, an international group of scientists gathered at the National Academy of Sciences to call for a moratorium on making inheritable changes to the human genome until there is a “broad societal consensus about the appropriateness” of any proposed change.

February 23, 2016
Nature
A meeting convened in December 2015 by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences and Medicine, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of London recommended such a moratorium in light of multiple safety and ethical concerns.

February 19, 2016
Facts About Gene Editing As Britain Oks Study
Macau Daily News
In December, international scientists and ethicists gathered at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences declared that while gene-editing is nowhere near ready to use for pregnancy, altering early embryos as part of careful laboratory research should be allowed even as society grapples with the ethical questions.

February 12, 2016
California stem cell agency may fund tests to edit genes in human embryos
Los Angeles Times
The group, convened by the National Academy of Sciences and scientists from China and Britain, said it would be "irresponsible to proceed" with such research until there was "broad societal consensus" on whether making inheritable changes to the human genome was appropriate.

February 10, 2016
Get the facts about gene editing
Northwest Herald
In December, international scientists and ethicists gathered at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences declared that while gene-editing is nowhere near ready to use for pregnancy, altering early embryos as part of careful laboratory research should be allowed even as society grapples with the ethical questions.

February 5, 2016
Human Embryo Gene Editing Gets Go-Ahead in U.K.
Science Friday
We had a global summit sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the United States Academy and the United Kingdom Academies and was held in Washington in December and our organizing committee, which really endorsed the need for the research we’re talking about today that’s been approved in the U.K. as long as it remains laboratory based.

February 3, 2016
Britain's new gene technology gets the go-ahead
Health24
In December, international scientists and ethicists gathered at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences declared that while gene-editing is nowhere near ready to use for pregnancy, altering early embryos as part of careful laboratory research should be allowed even as society grapples with the ethical questions.

February 1, 2016
Facts about gene editing as Britain OKs study
Associated Press
In December, international scientists and ethicists gathered at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences declared that while gene-editing is nowhere near ready to use for pregnancy, altering early embryos as part of careful laboratory research should be allowed even as society grapples with the ethical questions.

January 11, 2016
Bay Area biologist's gene-editing kit lets do-it-yourselfers play God at the kitchen table

San Jose Mercury News
"You've got guys with B.S. degrees, in a garage,"  warned Hank Greely, director of Stanford's Center for Law and the Biosciences at an international summit of the National Academy of Sciences this month.

December 28, 2015
Should We Engineer Future Humans?
Pacific Standard
To their credit, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the United Kingdom's Royal Academy convened a global summit in early December, where they held open debates about the ethical issues raised by gene editing and converged around a set of norms: They decided that research with CRISPR should continue, but that a moratorium should be placed on engineering human embryos that result in pregnancies. 

December 26, 2015
The breakthrough in gene editing
JournalStar (editorial)
An international panel of scientists at the Human Gene Editing Summit at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington D.C. earlier this month issued a statement that gene editing on human DNA should be restricted.

December 26, 2015
San Diego: Ground Zero for 2015's social changes

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Earlier this month, the influential National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine released a statement at its International Summit on Human Gene Editing calling for broader regulatory oversight — and raising moral concerns that “‘permanent genetic enhancements’ to subsets of the population could exacerbate social inequities or be used coercively.”

December 21, 2015
US Summit Draws Attention to Technology with Potential, Peril
The Washington Diplomat
The three-day international summit, convened by the U.S. National Academy of Science and National Academy of Medicine with the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the U.K.'s Royal Society, concluded Dec. 3.

December 18, 2015
A Pause to Weigh Risks of Gene Editing
New York Times (Opinion)
An international panel of experts has wisely called for a pause in using the technique to produce genetic changes that could be inherited by future generations…The international panel calling for a pause met in Washington this month at the National Academy of Sciences and was jointly convened by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of London.

December 16, 2015
Can The Creation of 'Human GMOs' Cure Genetic Diseases?
Forbes (Opinion)
The move toward prohibition gained ground at a conference held in Washington DC in early December under the auspices of National Academies of Science of the United States, China and the U.K.

December 16, 2015
CRISPR Blossoms
The Scientist
The debate culminated in an international summit held at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, DC, earlier this month. 

December 16, 2015
R&D Challenges and Opportunities in 2016

R & D Magazine
The International Summit on Human Gene Editing—hosted by the U.S. National Academies, UK Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences—concluded on Dec. 3 after three days of discussion on the scientific, ethical and governance issues associated with human gene editing technologies like CRISPR. 

December 15, 2015
Gene editing—a revolution from stem to stern

The Lancet
Dec 1-3, 2015, experts from the leading international scientific groups in this domain at the Gene Editing Summit held at the National Academy of Sciences and the National, co-hosted with the Academy of Medicine Chinese Academy of Sciences and the UK's Royal Society.

December 11, 2015
The great potential — and great risks — of gene editing
Washington Post- Opinion
A good sign that the scientific community is taking concerns such as these seriously is the organization by the National Academy of Sciences of a Committee on Gene Drive Research in Non-Human Organisms.

December 11, 2015
Germline editing dominates DNA summit
Science Magazine (subscription)
In response, the National Academy of Sciences and Medicine, the United Kingdom's Royal Society, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences rushed to convene the summit.

December 9, 2015
If You Could Design Your Baby's Genes, Would You?

POLITICO Magazine
On the contrary, in a statement issued last week at a landmark International Summit on Human Gene Editing at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., which drew more than 400 people—including biologists, physicians, and social scientists, lawyers, philosophers and bioethicists, academic, medical and government administrators, corporate investors and biotechnologists, advocates for women as well as patients, reporters, editors and this historian—the panel of experts that organized the conference strongly cautioned against the editing of human embryos. 

December 9, 2015
The Ethics Of Gene Editing
WGBH NEWS
It is truly a brave new world as gene editing goes from a science fiction trope in movies like Gattaca, to becoming a real world solution to eradicating some of our deadliest diseases. Last week, geneticists, lawyers, ethicists and a few patient groups, joined together at the National Academy of Sciences to discuss the moral implications of using CRISPR 9, an accurate gene editing technique. 

December 8, 2015
Future-proofing
Nature (Editorial)
While environmentalists search for new technologies to safeguard the future, biologists have a whole box of new tools that can reveal and manipulate the genome. As we report on page 173, the atmosphere at the Washington meeting — convened to discuss the implications of human-gene-editing techniques — was cordial and hopeful.

December 8, 2015
Global summit reveals divergent views on human gene editing
Nature
Held on 1–3 December, the International Summit on Human Gene Editing was organized by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences and Medicine, the Royal Society in London and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

December 8, 2015
This Could Be the End of Malaria as We Know It
Fortune
Last week, scientists convened for an international summit in Washington, D.C. to debate the ethics of CRISPR.

December 7, 2015
‘Kill Switches’ Keep GMOs on a Short Leash
Discover Magazine
Just last week, an international summit on human gene editing was convened in Washington D.C. to discuss ethical guidelines for future gene editing research, among other agenda items.

December 7, 2015
Why treat gene editing differently in two types of human cells?
The Conversation
Co-organized by US, UK and Chinese national academies, the summit gathered preeminent researchers, clinicians and ethicists to grapple with how new gene editing technologies – particularly the method known as CRISPR – should be used.

December 6, 2015
Excitement rises over gene editing tool

Financial Times
These matters were scheduled to be discussed last week at a meeting convened in Washington by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences to examine human gene-editing.

December 4, 2015
Inside the summit on human gene editing: A reporter’s notebook

Science
All was on display—and streaming live online—at the International Summit on Human Gene Editing, which concluded yesterday here at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

December 3, 2015
No designer babies, but summit calls for cautious research
Associated Press
"As scientific knowledge advances and societal views evolve, the clinical use of germline editing should be revisited on a regular basis," the committee concluded. It urged the sponsors of this week's summit — the scientific Academies of the U.S., Britain and China — to create an international forum to help "establish norms concerning acceptable uses of human germline editing."

December 3, 2015
Gene summit organizers urge caution on human gene editing
Reuters
Scientists and ethicists gathered at an international summit in Washington said it would be "irresponsible" to use gene editing technology in human embryos for therapeutic purposes, such as to correct genetic diseases, until safety and efficacy issues are resolved.

December 3, 2015
Gene-editing summit supports some research in human embryos
Nature
But the summit statement, authored by a 12-member organizing committee, cautioned that many technical and ethical issues should be settled before anyone attempts ‘germline’ editing — the deletion of a gene prenatally in an effort to erase an inherited disease from an embryo and prevent it from being passed on to future generations. The three-day international summit took place at the the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine in Washington DC. The meeting was jointly hosted by the US academies, the UK Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

December 3, 2015 
Gene editing: Is era of designer humans getting closer?
BBC News
An international meeting of leading scientists has said it would be "irresponsible" to allow the creation of genetically altered humans.

December 3, 2015
Gene editing designer babies would be ‘irresponsible,’ says international scientific committee

PBS News Hour
Baltimore’s remarks closed the three-day conference, which was convened by the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. with the joint support of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and U.K.’s Royal Society.

December 3, 2015
All Gene-Editing Research Should Proceed Cautiously, Scientists Conclude

Scientific American
Tweaking the human genome with current and future gene-editing tools could lead to sophisticated treatments and prevention strategies for disease. The promise of those applications is reason enough to move forward with such work in the lab and clinic, albeit cautiously, the dozen scientists and bioethicists who organized the International Summit on Human Gene Editing said today after three days of deliberation and presentations in Washington, D.C.

December 3, 2015 
Gene Editing: Group Says OK Do It, But Be Careful
NBC News
There's no reason to stop scientists from doing gene editing, experts agreed Thursday, but researchers need to be careful and no one's ready yet to do "germline" editing that could be passed to future generations…The meeting, sponsored by the National Science Academies of the U.S., Britain and China, has no power to make anyone do anything. But the organizers managed to get broad buy-in from many, if not most, of the researchers who know how to do genetic manipulation for medical purposes.

December 3, 2015
Summit rules out ban on gene editing embryos destined to become people

The Guardian
The international summit in Washington was organized by the National Academies of the US, UK and China to take stock of powerful new tools that can make precision changes to the code of life, by correcting, removing and adding DNA to an organism’s genome.

December 3, 2015 
Geneticists Urge Caution on Breakthrough Technology of Gene Editing
U.S. News and World Report
Committee members called on the summit's host organizations, The National Academy of Sciences, The Academy of Medicine, the British Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, to create an ongoing forum for discussion of the technique and its uses.

December 3, 2015
Human Gene Editing Summit Organizers Say Proceed With Caution

Medscape
In a separate statement, the presidents of the four National Academies, that cohosted the summit thank the leaders of the summit for their "thoughtful concluding statement and welcome their call for us to continue to lead a global discussion on issues related to human gene editing."

December 3, 2015
Gene editing: Don't use in human reproduction, panel says

San Jose Mercury News
The decision was reached after a three-day International Summit in Washington, D.C. about the cheap, fast, precise and powerful way to "edit" DNA using the controversial technology called CRISPR, first conceived by UC Berkeley molecular biologist Jennifer Doudna.

December 3, 2015 
Top Scientists Are Calling For Real Limits On Genetically Engineered “Designer Babies”
Buzz Feed
Making “designer babies” by genetic engineering is irresponsible, hundreds of scientists urged at a conference on Thursday. They called for a delay in fertility clinic use of the promising new technology until scientists figure out the safety risks and the general public grapples with a coming era of genetic engineering.

December 3, 2015 
To Edit the Human Genome Now Would Be "Irresponsible"
Slate
At fertilization, you are dealt a genetic hand of cards. Your genome largely dictates whether you will be short or tall, able to taste certain chemicals, or prone to some types of cancer. But what if it were possible to stack the deck?  That was the question facing the International Summit on Human Gene Editing, a public meeting convened with an organizing committee of 10 scientists and 2 bioethicists to address the ethical and biomedical ramifications of powerful new genetic technologies.

December 3, 2015
Global summit opens door to controversial gene editing of human embryos
STAT
The committee therefore called on the U.S. National Academies of Sciences and Medicine, Britain’s Royal Society, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences — which jointly hosted the meeting — “to take the lead in creating an ongoing international forum to discuss potential clinical uses of gene editing.”

December 3, 2015 
It’s too early for gene-editing of human reproductive cells, experts conclude
Washington Post
The conference at the National Academies of Sciences was called because a revolutionary way of editing genes — known as CRISPR-Cas9 — allows many scientists to alter genes in plants and animals quickly and inexpensively.

December 3, 2015
Scientists Seek Moratorium on Edits to Human Genome That Could Be Inherited
New York Times
An international group of scientists meeting in Washington called on Thursday for what would, in effect, be a moratorium on making inheritable changes to the human genome.

December 3, 2015 
Why scientists are calling for caution on a powerful new gene-editing technology
Vox Media
But just because we have the power to do something doesn't mean we should. And talking about what scientists should do with CRISPR was the point of the international summit at the National Academy of Sciences.

December 3, 2015
Gene Edit Summit Leaders Stop Shy Of Call To Ban Germline Changes
Xconomy
Now that the summit has wrapped up, a committee convened by the U.S. National Academies will begin work on a comprehensive report on human gene editing that Baltimore said should be available by the end of 2016.

December 3, 2015
The slow crawl to designer babies
CNN
Thought leaders, scientists and policy makers from both countries are holding a historic summit in Washington this week to debate the question of "when, if ever, we will want to use gene editing to change human inheritance," as David Baltimore of Caltech, the summit chairman, put it in his opening remarks.

December 3, 2015 
International gene editing conference declines to ban eventual use in humans
Los Angeles Times
With questions of safety, need and ethics still unanswered, the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine; the United Kingdom's Royal Society; and the Chinese Academy of Science agreed that "it would be irresponsible to proceed with any clinical use of germline editing."

December 3, 2015
BBC World News
KOAB (PBS)
Should scientists be allowed to do research which alters the DNA of human embryos?
It is a question being discussed by hundreds of scientists from 20 countries in Washington, at a conference on what is known as gene editing.

December 3, 2015
National Public Radio

The meeting is called the International Summit on Human Gene Editing and I was really struck at this meeting and how the sense of history really permeated the meeting.

December 2, 2015
CBS This Morning
KGMB-HON (CBS)
A Summit to discuss the practice of gene editing is taking place in Washington this week.

December 2, 2015
FOX 25 Morning News
WFXT-BOS (FOX)
Hundreds of scientists are in D.C. this week for an international summit on gene-editing.  

December 2, 2015
This Scientist Says Your Fears About The Coming Genetic Engineering Revolution Are Overblown

Huffington Post (Opinion)
Concerns about how the use of CRISPR could go wrong are partly what spurred the conference, which is organized jointly by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the U.K. Royal Society, and will focus on the ethics of editing human DNA. 

December 1, 2015

Ethicists square off over editing genes in human embryos
Reuters
The three-day Washington meeting was convened by the National Academies of Sciences and Medicine, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of the United Kingdom.

December 1, 2015
The Future Of Gene Editing Is Being Decided Right Now
Popular Science
The summit, which started early this morning, is sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as well as the Royal Academy, and will include researchers from the United States, Great Britain, and China as well as representatives from at least 20 countries worldwide.

December 1, 2015 
International Summit To Debate Editing Human DNA
NPR
Hundreds of scientists from around the world are gathering in Washington, D.C. today for what some say could be a historic meeting.

December 1, 2015
Is gene editing going too far? Ethical boundaries debated at historic summit.

Christian Science Monitor
On Tuesday, scientists from the around the world convened for the first international summit to debate the benefits and risks of gene editing. The conference, held at the National Academies of Sciences in Washington, and co-hosted by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Britain's Royal Society, will run from Dec. 1-3.

December 1, 2015 
Everything You Need to Know About CRISPR Gene Editing’s Monster Year
MIT Technology Review
This week several hundred scientists and bioethicists are meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, to debate one of the most charged questions raised by CRISPR: whether we should ever use it to correct disease-causing genes in people before they’re born.

December 1, 2015 
CRISPR inventor calls for pause in editing heritable genes
Berkeley News
The conference, to be held at the National Academy of Sciences and streamed live Dec. 1-3, is co-sponsored by the National Academy of Medicine and co-hosted with the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the U.K.’s Royal Society.

December 1, 2015
Why we can trust scientists with the power of new gene-editing technology

The Conversation
Convened in response to recent advances in the field, the summit includes experts from the U.S. National Academy of Science, the UK's Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Science.

December 1, 2015
Scientists call for a ban on genetically modifying human embryos
Huewire News
The conference, to be held at the National Academy of Sciences and streamed live December 1-3, is co-sponsored by the National Academy of Medicine and co-hosted with the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the U.K.’s Royal Society.

December 1, 2015
The promise of gene editing
BBC News
Jointly organized by the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of London and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the three day meeting will examine the potential of gene editing as well as its risks.

December 1, 2015
What rules should we have for genetically editing humans?
Ars Technica
The summit, co-hosted by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, U.S. National Academy of Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the UK's Royal Society, is the start of a larger effort by the US National Academies to come up with a consensus study on the use of editing technology.

November 30, 2015
Could revolutionary gene-editing technology end cancer?
CBS This Morning
Doudna has long been vocal about the need to set ethical boundaries and is convening an international summit on the subject Tuesday in Washington, D.C.

November 30, 2015 
Human-genome editing summit to sample global attitudes
Nature
Jointly organized by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the UK Royal Society, the meeting is expected to draw representatives from more than 20 countries, including India, Sweden and Nigeria.

November 29, 2015
Gene Drives Could Wipe Out Insect-Borne Disease — But What's the Price?
Singularity Hub
Earlier this year, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine hosted a workshop to begin tackling the thorny issue of playing god.

November 28, 2015 
Future of human gene editing to be decided at landmark summit
The Guardian
Convened with some urgency by the US, UK and Chinese national academies, the meeting is billed as a “global discussion”.

November 27, 2015
Science: The clone factory

Financial Times
An encouraging sign of this process is the key role played by the Chinese Academy of Sciences in organising a meeting on gene editing in Washington next week, along with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and UK’s Royal Society.

November 25, 2015
Gene editing: Govern ability expectations
Nature
From a disability-rights viewpoint, problems that have dogged the debate on human genetic modification also pervade your curtain-raiser to the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine conference.

November 25, 2015
Gene editing: Survey invites opinions
Nature
As the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine summit on the regulation of CRISPR–Cas9 gene-editing tools gets under way, we invite readers to contribute their opinions about this technology and its use to a survey at go.nature.com/eyowaf.

November 21, 2015
This Technology Can Fight Can
cer And Create Adorable Mini Pigs. So Why Are Scientists So Worried?
Huffington Post (Opinion)
On Dec. 1, the National Academy of Sciences will host a three-day international conference to discuss the scientific, ethical and political issues raised by human gene-editing with Crispr.

November 17, 2015
China's Bold Push into Genetically Customized Animals

Scientific American
In early December scientists from the U.S., U.K. and China will meet at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., in an effort to codify international consensus on editing DNA, focusing on the human germ line.

November 17, 2015
Defensive drives
Nature (Editorial)
This has understandably raised some safety concerns, and the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, for example, has convened a committee to evaluate uses of gene drives.

November 16, 2015
Safety upgrade found for gene-editing technique
Nature 
But the publication kicked off concerns that the gene drive might escape from the lab into the wild, and the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine tasked a committee with evaluating the benefits and risks of the technology.

November 12, 2015
Can CRISPR Avoid the Monsanto Problem?

The New Yorker
Early next month, the National Academy of Sciences will convene an international conference devoted to the ethical use of this powerful new tool.

November 5, 2015
Leukaemia success heralds wave of gene-editing therapies
Nature
In a study presented in October at a meeting of the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Sangamo senior scientist Fyodor Urnov reported that his group had injected 15 monkeys with viruses that carried genes encoding ZFN and normal versions of factor IX — a blood-clotting protein produced by the liver, which is mutated in people with haemophilia B.

October 29, 2015
Gene drive workshop shows technology's promise, or peril, remains far off
Science
But a workshop hosted yesterday by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) in Washington, D.C., made abundantly clear that a lot of uncertainty—scientific and regulatory—still exists for the so-called gene-drive technology at the heart of such concepts.

October 28, 2015
Ben Carson: The candidate from bioethics
The Hill
The National Academies, along with science organizations around the world, are discussing the use of new technologies that can redesign or “edit” the genes in embryos.

October 26, 2015
CRISPR crisis: Is UK researcher’s human embryo gene editing research cause for worry?
Genetic Literacy Project
The global conversation she referred to is the international summit to be held this December, convened by the National Academy of Sciences to discuss the scientific and regulatory aspects of gene editing.

October 13, 2015
Where in the world could the first CRISPR baby be born?
Nature
“The truth is, we have guidelines but some people never follow them,” said Qi Zhou, a developmental biologist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Zoology in Beijing, at a meeting hosted by the US National Academy of Sciences in Washington DC last week.

October 12, 2015
Gene editing could make pig organs safe for human transplant
Wired.co.uk
Church, who has founded a private company called eGenesis to further develop the technique, told the National Academy of Sciences that his group had successfully created pig embryos with inactive PERV sequences.

October 9, 2015
Boom in gene-editing studies amid ethics debate over its use
Associated Press
The U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine will bring international scientists, ethicists and regulators together in December to start determining that balance.

October 9, 2015

Gene Editing Brings Us Closer To Using Pigs As A Source For Human Organ Transplants
Medical Daily
According to a recent study presented on last week at a meeting of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., our relationship with pigs may soon be getting more personal.

October 9, 2015
Gene editing: Research spurs debate over promise vs. ethics
Associated Press
The U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine will bring international scientists, ethicists and regulators together in December to start determining that balance.

October 7, 2015
With Gene Editing, Pigs Could Be The Perfect Organ Donar
Popular Science
Church announced his team's work this week at a meeting of the National Academy of Sciences, which was reported by Nature News.

October 6, 2015
Gene-editing record smashed in pigs
Nature
The work was presented on 5 October at a meeting of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) on human gene editing.

October 6, 2015
Science Would Like Some Rules for Genome Editing, Please
WIRED
Nobel laureate David Baltimore of CalTech is heading a National Academies of Science committee that's planning an even bigger international summit in December.

September 22, 2015
Genome Editing, Bioethics, Policy and Politics in the UK and in the US
Huffington Post (Opinion)
Only yesterday, after the news of Niakan's application to the HFEA, the NIH has reiterated the ban on applications of CRISPR/Cas9 to human embryos. A meeting of the National Academy of Sciences to discuss human genome editing applications is planned for early December in DC.

September 21, 2015
Another group of scientists just announced plans to tinker with human genes, and people are freaking out
Business Insider
Scientists and policymakers will discuss many of these issues at an international summit hosted by the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine in Washington, DC, in December.

September 18, 2015
UK scientists apply for licence to edit genes in human embryos
Science
And on 14 September, Britain's Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences announced that they would join forces with the US National Academy of Sciences and the US National Academy of Medicine to host a summit in December on germline editing (genetic changes to embryos, sperm and eggs).

September 18, 2015
British scientists seek to edit the genes of embryos; bioethicists warn of potential dangers
Washington Post
A discussion is scheduled for Dec. 1-3 during the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine international summit here Washington, D.C.

September 18, 2015
British Scientists Seek Permission To Edit DNA In Human Embryos
NPR
The U.S. National Academy of Sciences is studying the issue and is convening an international summit in December in Washington, D.C., in conjunction with the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society. 
 
September 14, 2015
US, China, UK experts to tackle vexed issue of gene editing
Reuters
The Chinese Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society said on Monday they would join the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in co-hosting an international summit on the topic in Washington on Dec. 1-3.

September 11, 2015
Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?
The Scientist
The group's statement “seems weak on addressing why we should single out genome editing relative to other medicines,” he wrote in an email to Science. The National Academies of Science is set to hold a summit on genome editing technologies this December.

September 9, 2015
Research on gene editing in embryos is justified, group says
Science AAAS
The debate is sure to continue. The U.S. National Academies of Sciences will host an international summit on genome editing in early December.

September 1, 2015
Medical specialists urge more debate on gene-editing technology
Reuters
The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and its Institute of Medicine are due to convene an international summit this year for researchers and other experts to explore the scientific, ethical, and policy issues associated with human gene-editing research.

September 1, 2015
CRISPR Cash: Intellia The Latest Gene-Editing Firm To Nab Big Money
Xconomy
Work in human cells has emerged, too, sparking fears that altered reproductive cells or embryos—the human germline—would be used to make babies engineered for looks or intelligence, for example. The U.S. National Academies are planning an international summit later this year.

August 23, 2015
Editing humanity requires rules
Winnipeg Free Press (Opinion)
The U.S. National Academy of Sciences plans a conference to delve into CRISPR's ethics. The discussion is sorely needed. CRISPR is a boon, but it raises profound questions.

August 22, 2015
The age of the red pen
The Economist
America's National Academies of Science are convening a gathering in December to look at the options. Genetics is a peculiarly personal science, but it is also one very prone to politics. The power of CRISPR looks sure to exacerbate that propensity.

August 4, 2015
Driving test
Nature (Editorial)
Last week, the debate gained momentum when the US National Academy of Sciences held its first meeting to evaluate the potential benefits and risks of gene drives.

July 28, 2015
National Academies to Establish Human Gene Editing Guidelines
The Journal of the American Medical Association
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) announced May 18 that the organizations are jointly launching an initiative to develop decision-making guidelines for human gene editing.

July 28, 2015
Easy DNA Editing Will Remake the World. Buckle Up.
Wired
A month later, the US National Academy of Sciences announced that it would create a set of recommendations for scientists, policymakers, and regulatory agencies on when, if ever, embryonic engineering might be permissible. Another National Academy report will focus on gene drives. Though those recommendations don't carry the weight of law, federal funding in part determines what science gets done, and agencies that fund research around the world often abide by the academy's guidelines.

July 9, 2015
Last scientist in Congress warns on human genetic engineering
The Hill
So serious is the potential for CRISPR and related tools that the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine recently announced that they will launch a major international initiative to develop guidelines for human gene editing.

July 1, 2015
Gene politics
Nature
On 16 June, a subcommittee of the US House Committee on Space, Science and Technology held a hearing on human gene editing with witnesses who included Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was one of the inventors of the genome-editing system CRISPR, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) president Victor Dzau.

June 30, 2015
Lawmakers Try to Stop Embryo Editing and Three-Parent Embryos
Newsweek
Additionally, the bill would require the FDA to appoint a panel bioethicists and experts from religious-based medical organizations to review a soon-to-be-published report from the Institute of Medicine that examines the controversy of human embryo editing. The report will review the research projects already in progress on embryo editing, and also outline its potential uses in the field of reproductive medicine and genetics.

June 29, 2015
Lawmakers Move to Ban Funding For Human Embryo Editing
Popular Science
The FDA has been keeping its eye on this kind of research for a long time, which is why it commissioned a report by the U.S. Institute of Medicine to uncover the implications for it, so far the agency has not given any indication that it would actually sponsor this kind of research.

June 25, 2015
Ethical and regulatory reflections on CRISPR gene editing revolution
Genetic Literacy Project
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and its Institute of Medicine announced it will convene an international summit this fall to “explore the scientific, ethical, and policy issues associated with human gene-editing research.”

June 24, 2015
CRISPR: Move beyond differences
Nature
Plans for the international meeting were announced by the US National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine after a study was published in which researchers used a gene-editing tool known as CRISPR to modify the genomes of non-viable human embryos.

June 23, 2015
CRISPR: Science can't solve it
Nature
Leaders of the scientific community are ready to share the responsibility for these powerful technologies with the public. George Church, a geneticist at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and others wrote last year of CRISPR that “the decision of when and where to apply this technology, and for what purposes, will be in our collective hands”. But scientists also want to control the terms of engagement. The US National Academies, for example, will “guide decision making” by convening researchers and other experts later this year “to explore the scientific, ethical and policy issues associated with human gene-editing research”.

June 17, 2015
Scientists could one day create genetically modified ‘designer babies’ — but should they?
Fusion
The National Academy of Sciences has put together an international advisory group to set guidelines on how to assess the safety and efficacy of CRISPR-based treatments and when and how they would be used in humans.

June 15, 2015
National Academies Name Human Gene Editing Advisory Group
GenomeWeb
The National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine have named an advisory group for their human gene editing initiative.

June 11, 2015
For Genome Editing, Self-Regulation Beats A Government Ban
Forbes
August organizations such as the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine just announced that they’ll host a meeting this fall to try to wrestle some of the thorny issues raised by the ability to alter genomes.

June 10, 2015
Ethical and regulatory reflections on CRISPR gene editing revolution
Genetic Literacy Project
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and its Institute of Medicine announced it will convene an international summit this fall to “explore the scientific, ethical, and policy issues associated with human gene-editing research.”

June 9, 2015
A Moratorium on Gene Editing
Laboratory Equipment
In addition, the researchers urged a national debate on how to proceed. Shortly after, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine announced a new initiative to guide decision-making on human gene editing.

June 4, 2015
National academies move to design regulations on germline editing
Genetic Literacy Project
The National Academies of Science (NAS) and National Academies of Medicine (NAM) have their work cut out for them as they begin hashing out under what circumstances, if any, should researchers carry out germline editing of human genomes.

June 4, 2015
Lander Weighs in on Issues Raised by Germline Genome Editing
GenomeWeb
With an international conference scheduled for this fall by the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine to discuss wide-ranging implications of human germline editing, Lander voiced the need for a framework to evaluate the topic.

June 3, 2015
CRISPR, the disruptor
Nature
The US National Research Council has formed a panel to discuss gene drives, and other high-level discussions are starting to take place.

June 3, 2015
Human germline gene editing too complex for black-and-white moral framing
Genetic Literacy Project
The first day of BEINGS2015, “A Gathering of Global Thought Leaders to Reach Consensus on the Direction of Biotechnology for the 21st Century”, in Atlanta, coincided with the announcement by the National Academy of Science and National Academy of Medicine of an initiative to look into “promising new treatments for disease,” given that “recent experiments to attempt to edit human genes also have raised important questions about the potential risks and ethical concerns of altering the human germline.”

May 28, 2015
The Lessons of Asilomar for Today’s Science
The New York Times (Opinion)
In 1973, scientists who were using novel molecular techniques to splice DNA between different organisms asked the National Academy of Sciences to consider the potential hazards as they might affect the public.

May 27, 2015
The White House Supports A Proposed Ban On Editing The Human Germline
Io9
In response to these concerns, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and its National Academy of Medicine have announced an international meeting to be held this fall in which researchers, bioethicists, and other experts will discuss the implications of human germline gene-editing technologies in both research and clinical applications.

May 27, 2015
White House Puts Hold on Type of Gene Engineering
HealthDay
The National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine plan to hold an international meeting in the fall to discuss the issue, NBC News reported.

May 26, 2015
White House hits pause on editing human germline cells
Science News
An international summit convened this fall by the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine will tackle the issue.

May 26, 2015
A Note on Genome Editing
The White House
The White House applauds NAS and NAM for convening this dialogue and fully supports a robust review of the ethical issues associated with using gene-editing technology to alter the human germline.

May 26, 2015
White House: ethics of human genome editing needs further review
Reuters
The National Academy of Sciences said last week it would convene an international summit this fall to explore the ethical and policy issues associated with the research and appoint an international committee to recommend guidelines for the technology.

May 26, 2015
US scientists to write CRISPR 'rulebook'
BioNews
Two major not-for-profit US organisations, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the Institute of Medicine (IoM), are planning an international summit in the Autumn as part of an attempt to agree clinical and ethical standards on the future use and development of the technology.

May 26, 2015
Gene-Editing: Hold Off For Now, White House Says
NBC News
The National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) said last week they'd hold an international meeting this fall for discussion of the issue.

May 22, 2015
Tackling embryo gene editing
Science
Responding to an uproar over attempts to genetically modify human embryos, the U.S. National Academies is launching an international initiative to discuss this ethically fraught area.

May 22, 2015
US scientists vow to answer CRISPR’s sticky moral questions
BioPharma
The heads of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine described the new generation of human gene research as controversial.

May 22, 2015
Update on gene editing of human embryos–and other organisms
Plos Blogs
The National Academy of Sciences has confirmed officially that yes, as rumored for weeks, it will hold a meeting to thrash out issues posed by the new gene editing techniques.

May 22, 2015
Scientists question ethics of 'designer babies'
Health24
In response, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and its Institute of Medicine will convene an international summit this fall where researchers and other experts will "explore the scientific, ethical, and policy issues associated with human gene-editing research", the academies said in a statement.

May 20, 2015
Scientists to thrash out rules on genetically modified humans
Independent
Despite the fact that these embryos were reportedly ‘non-viable’, the work has spurred the US National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine to create a rulebook of what the scientific community considers to be acceptable use of the gene-editing system called CRISPR-Cas9 which allows mutated sequences of DNA to be removed from a fertilized ovum.

May 19, 2015
Top US scientists want guidelines on editing human genomes
The Verge
The National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine said this week that they would launch an initiative to develop guidelines for editing human genomes — a subject that's raised long-simmering, radical ethical issues.

May 19, 2015
Scientists set to work out guidelines for CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing initiatives
World Tech Today
Chartered by Congress in 1863, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in partnership with the Institute of Medicine will be holding an international conference where scientists will explore the ethical, scientific, social, and political implication of gene editing therapies.

May 19, 2015
Five things for pharma marketers to know
Medical Marketing & Media
The National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine will hold an international summit to discuss ethical and scientific issues associated with gene editing. Reuters reported that the fall conference will focus on CRISPR-Cas9 technology that “allows scientists to edit virtually any gene they target.” This new technology is associated with claims that it could create “designer babies.”

May 19, 2015
Beware games and gizmos that promise younger brains
Herald Tribune
The Institute of Medicine has cautioned consumers to beware of phony or poorly tested products that claim to “prevent, slow or reverse the effects of cognitive aging.”

May 18, 2015
US science academies take on human-genome editing
Nature
The US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will launch a major initiative to develop guidelines for editing human genomes, they said on 18 May.

May 18, 2015
U.S. science leaders to tackle ethics of gene-editing technology
Reuters
In response, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and its Institute of Medicine will convene an international summit this fall where researchers and other experts will "explore the scientific, ethical, and policy issues associated with human gene-editing research," the academies said in a statement.

May 18, 2015
National academies will meet to guide 'gene editing' research
San Jose Mercury News
The landmark conference, announced Monday by the Washington, D.C.-based National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine, will gather researchers and other experts to review and explore the scientific, ethical and social implications of the practice, which can "cut and paste" gene sequences.

May 18, 2015
NAS, IOM Announce Committee, Conference to Discuss Gene-Editing Research
Genome Web (Subscription)
The National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine today announced an initiative aimed at guiding decision making on new research involving human gene editing.



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