Contact Us  |  Search:  
 
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Resilient America
Office of Special Projects
Policy and Global Affairs
Home Who We Are What We Do News Events Resources Subscribe

logo 400px

The logo 140px Roundtable and its programs aim to help communities and the nation 
build resilience to extreme events, save lives, and reduce the physical and economic costs of disasters.

People working together

 

Members of the ResilientAmerica Roundtable

Ms. Linda Langston - Roundtable Co-Chair
National Association of Counties

Dr. Janice Barnes
Waggonner & Ball

Ms. Jainey Bavishi
NYC Mayor’s Office

Mr. Ray Bonilla, Jr.
Kaiser Permanente

Lt. General Thomas Bostick, Ret. (NAE)
Intrexon Corporation

Mr. Daniel Burger
Charleston Resilience Network

Ms. Jane Cage
InsightFive22

Vice Admiral James Card, Ret.
U.S. Coast Guard

Ms. Arrietta Chakos
Urban Resilience Strategies

Dr. Anita Chandra
RAND Corp.

Mr. Daniel Cotter
Department of Homeland Security

Dr. Susan Cutter
University of South Carolina

Dr. Tamara Dickinson
Science Matters Consulting, LLC

Mr. John Dorman
North Carolina Emergency Management

Mr. James Gore
Sonoma County Board of Supervisors

Mr. Mike Grimm
Federal Emergency Management Agency

Dr. Geoffrey Heal (NAS)
Columbia Business School

Dr. Kevin P. Heaslip 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Dr. Quintus Jett
Rutgers University-Newark

Dr. Susan W. Kieffer
(NAS)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Ms. Ann Lesperance
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Dr. Kristin Ludwig
U.S. Geological Survey

Mr. David Miller
Independent Contractor

Mr. Steve Moddemeyer
CollinsWoerman Architects

Mr. Brooks Nelson
U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation

Dr. Lori Peek
University of Colorado-Boulder

Mr. Chris Poland (NAE)
Chris D. Poland Consulting Engineer

Mr. Otis Rolley
The Rockefeller Foundation

Dr. Monica Schoch-Spana
Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Ross Stein
Temblor, Inc.

Dr. Eric Tate
University of Iowa

Dr. Erin Walsh
Department of Homeland Security

Dr. David Yoskowitz
Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

 

 
 
 

Ms. Linda Langston
Director of Strategic Relations, National Association of Counties


Linda Langston is the Director of Strategic Relations for the National Association of Counties in Washington DC. Ms. Langston previously served on the Linn County Board of Supervisors from 203-2016. In Iowa she remains as the Chair of the Linn County Public Health Board, and in Rotary. Ms. Langston is a former president of the National Association of Counties (NACo). Her presidential initiative was Resilient Counties, which focused on building communities’ capacity to be ready, resilient, agile and adaptive in the face of natural, manmade and economic disasters. Her home county was devastated by flooding in 2008. Also during her time at NACo she served as chairs of the Health Steering Committee, Healthy Counties Advisory Board, Finance Committee, and Arts and Culture Commission. Her outstanding leadership in arts and culture earned her the 2009 Americans for the Arts’ Public Official of the Year Award. Ms. Langston is a member of the Resilient America Roundtable for the National Academy of Sciences and the National Advisory Council for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Born in Chicago and raised in Iowa, Langston graduated from Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois with a degree in history. She is a 2007 graduate of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government for State and Local Officials.


Dr. Janice Barnes
Principal/Director of Resilience, Waggonner and Ball

Janice Barnes is the director of resilience at Waggonner & Ball. Dr. Barnes works with clients to identify their risks and vulnerabilities and to meet their resilience goals. With nearly 30 years of design experience bridging practical applications with empirical research, Janice recognizes critical organizational processes and links these to appropriate design responses. Internationally recognized for this expertise, Janice links environmental, social and economic indicators to advance resilience principles and connect knowledge across communities. Dr. Barnes has a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, an M.S.in Architecture from the University of Michigan, an M. Arch from Tulane University, and a B.A. from the University of Tennessee. 
 

Ms. Jainey Bavishi
Director of NYC Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency

Jainey Bavishi is the director of Recovery and Resiliency for the New York City Mayor’s Office. Ms. Bavishi is an expert in climate adaptation and resiliency whose work is nationally recognized. In her current role as the director of New York City’s OneNYC resiliency program, she is working to prepare the city for the impacts of climate change. Ms. Bavishi most recently served as the associate director for Climate Preparedness at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. In this role, she led the implementation of the climate preparedness pillar of the President's Climate Action Plan. In the final year of the Obama Administration, Ms. Bavishi was responsible for embedding and institutionalizing climate resilience considerations across Federal programs and policies; advancing climate equity to address the disproportionate impacts of climate change on low-income and other vulnerable communities; and developing innovative approaches to climate adaptation finance. Prior to that, Ms. Bavishi served as the executive director of R3ADY Asia-Pacific based in Honolulu, Hawaii, where she was responsible for initiating, expanding and managing the start-up public-private partnership, which focused on enhancing disaster risk reduction and resilience in the Asia-Pacific region. Ms. Bavishi holds an M.S. in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.S. in Public Policy and Cultural Anthropology from Duke University.
 

Mr. Ray Bonilla
Executive Director, IT Resiliency & Disaster Recovery Services, Kaiser Permanente

Ray Bonilla leads the resiliency and continuity efforts for Kaiser Permanente IT. As the leader for IT Resiliency, he is responsible for the strategic direction and execution of enterprise-wide IT resiliency management programs, IT business continuity planning, IT crisis management, HIPAA contingency planning compliance, and enterprise technology risk and impact assessments and professional teams. Mr. Bonilla leads cross-organizational programs and initiatives to enhance the resiliency of Kaiser Permanente’s IT workforce, technology infrastructures, and business processes. He also provides strong leadership in developing strategies, executing on commitments from executive leadership and the Board of Directors, and change management with key stakeholders around the organization. Mr. Bonilla is committed to excellence in resiliency as part of Kaiser Permanente’s broader mission to care for the communities it serves. He has extensive experience managing large and complex business continuity, emergency management, and disaster recovery programs. Prior to joining IT, he served as a senior business continuity consultant with Kaiser Permanente’s Corporate Offices, where he managed the development, implementation, testing, and maintenance of over 2,000 business continuity plans. As a regional project manager for T-Mobile, USA, Mr. Bonilla designed, developed, and implemented preparedness programs and training. He serves on numerous business continuity boards, committees, and focus groups throughout the United States. His activities include director of membership for the Association of Contingency Planners, and terrorism liaison officer with the Northern California Regional Intelligence Center. Mr. Bonilla is a Master Business Continuity Professional (MBCP), a Project Management Professional (PMP), and an Associate Fellow of the Business Continuity Institute (AFBCI). He received his bachelor’s degree in organizational communications from California State University, East Bay, and his MBA from the University of San Francisco.


Lt. General Thomas Bostick (Ret.), PhD, PE, NAE
COO, Intrexon Corporation

Thomas P. Bostick is a 1978 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy and holds Master of Science Degrees in both Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University, and a PhD in Systems Engineering from George Washington University. He currently serves as the Chief Operating Officer at Intrexon, a leader in the engineering and industrialization of biology to improve the quality of life and health of the planet. As Chief Operating Officer, Lt. Gen. (Ret) Bostick oversees operations across the Company's multiple technology divisions, driving efficiency and effectiveness in the application of the Company's assets toward its development projects. Lt. Gen. (Ret) Bostick served as the 53rd Chief of Engineers and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, where he was responsible for most of the Nation’s civil works infrastructure and military construction. Lt. Gen. (Ret) Bostick also served as the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1, responsible for total Army personnel and manpower; Commanding General, U.S. Army Recruiting Command; and as the Assistant Division Commander-Maneuver; and then Assistant Division Commander-Support of the 1st Cavalry Division. He deployed with the Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom before commanding the Army Corps of Engineers Gulf Region Division, where he was responsible for more than $18 Billion of reconstruction in Iraq. Lt. Gen. (Ret) Bostick also served as an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at West Point and was a White House Fellow, working as a special assistant to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs. Lt. Gen. (Ret) Bostick has been one of the leading advocates in the federal government on resilience and developing a systems approach to watersheds. He has appeared on CNN, FOX News, CBS Evening News, the Daily Show and more. He has spoken extensively on resilience including remarks at the United Nations, Risk Analysis World Congress in Singapore, and the National Academy of Sciences. He led the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the completion of the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study: Resilient Adaptation to Increasing Risk report to Congress in 2015. Lt. Gen. Bostick was selected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Construction, and the George Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science Hall of Fame for his many contributions to engineering.


Mr. Daniel Burger
Chair, Charleston Resilience Network

Daniel Burger is the founding chair of the Charleston Resilience Network (CRN). CRN is a collaboration of public, private, and non-profit organizations seeking to enhance the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses and systems within the Charleston region to survive, adapt and grow despite episodic natural disasters and chronic climate hazards. Inspired by opportunities to connect social and technical science with public policy, Mr. Burger is committed to developing solutions to complex resource management and inter-governmental planning challenges. Since 2004, Mr. Burger has served in senior leadership positions for the South Carolina Coastal Zone Management Program. His efforts have focused on enhancing the delivery of value-added products, policy analysis and technical planning assistance to stakeholders and building the cooperative capacity among governments to manage fragile coastal resources. Mr. Burger currently serves on numerous local, state and regional advisory boards, including Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA, a NOAA RISA), S.C. Sea Grant Climate Advisory Committee, Charleston Harbor Watershed Resilience Study Committee, Charleston Area Transportation Policy Committee and the College of Charleston Master of Public Administration Program. Mr. Burger also represents the CRN to the Regional Consortium Coordinating Council (RC3). Mr. Burger is a member of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) and the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA). Prior to his work in South Carolina, Mr. Burger worked to advance environmental public policy and build the capacity of non-profit organizations in Maryland. Mr. Burger earned an M.P.A. in Public Administration from the College of Charleston and a B.A. in Government and Industrial Sociology from Western Maryland College.
 

Ms. Jane Cage
Principal, InsightFive22 and Senior Advisor for Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Innovative Emergency management

Jane Cage is the principal at InsightFive22. Ms. Cage’s professional experience also includes consulting on projects around long-term recovery and resilience.She has been an instructor for FEMA for classes based on community long-term recovery and is certified to teach E0210 and L0205 - Disaster Recovery: The Role of the Local Community and L0209: State Recovery Planning and Coordination. After the city of Joplin was impacted by an EF-5 tornado in May 22, 2011, Ms. Cage served as the volunteer chairman of the newly formed Citizens Advisory Recovery Team (CART). As CART leader, she led the group in listening to citizens about their vision for a recovered Joplin. The resulting report became the long-term recovery plan for Joplin.For over 30 years,Cage worked in the IT channel as an entrepreneur as a partner and COO of Heartland Technology Solutions (HTS), a regional business networking firm with offices in five states. Known for her channel advocacy , leadership and gentle approach to building a successful business, Ms.Cage served on a number of industry and vendor boards until the sale of HTS in 2012. Ms. Cage is a graduate of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard University and the FEMA Emergency Management Institute. Ms. Cage holds a B.A. in Economics and a B.A. in Spanish from Wake Forest University.

 
Vice Admiral James C Card (Ret.)
Retired, U.S. Coast Guard

Jim Card became the Vice Commandant of the United States Coast Guard on 24 July 1998 until his retirement on 1 July 2000. Previously Vice Admiral card served as the Commander, coast Guard pacific Area, Eleventh Coast Guard District, US Maritime Defense Zone Pacific, and Regional emergency transportation Coordinator from May 1997 to June 1998. His other previous flag assignments were as Assistant Commandant for Marine Safety and Environmental Protection at Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C. (1994 – 1997), and as Commander of the Eighth Coast Guard District in New Orleans (1992 – 1994). His decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, three Legion of Merit awards, four Meritorious Service Medals and a US Coast Guard Commendation Medal. He is the 1997 recipient of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers’ Vice Admiral jerry Land medal for outstanding accomplishments in the marine field. He also received the prestigious Rear Admiral Shepheard Award from the Chamber of Shipping of America in recognition of his achievement in merchant marine safety. Throughout his career, he has represented the US as a member of delegations to the IMO and headed the Delegations to the IMO Maritime Safety and Marine Environmental Protection Committees. In 1964 he graduated from the US Coast Guard Academy with two masters’ degrees, one in naval architecture and one in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1970. He also graduated from the Industrial College of Armed Forces in 1986.
 

Ms. Arrietta Chakos
Policy Advisor, Urban Resilience Strategies

Arrietta Chakos is a public policy advisor on urban resilience. She works on local and national community resilience strategies and multi-sectoral engagement. Her work with San Francisco, Palo Alto, and regional institutions, such as the Association of Bay Area Governments, focuses on disaster readiness and community resilience. Current efforts include coordinating with the Rockefeller Foundation 100 Resilient Cities Initiative in the Bay Area as well as a regional resilience project with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Ms. Chakos is currently a member of the Resilience Roundtable at the National Academy of Sciences. She is also a member of the National Research Council Advisory Committee to the U.S. Global Change Research Program and chairs the Housner Fellow committee at the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. Ms. Chakos served as research director of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Acting in Time Advance Recovery Project. She was assistant city manager in Berkeley, California, directing innovative risk mitigation initiatives, intergovernmental coordination, and multi-institutional negotiations. Ms. Chakos holds an M.P.A. from Harvard University and a B.A. from Humboldt State University.

Dr. Anita Chandra
Vice President and Director, RAND Social and Economic Well-Being, RAND Corp.

Anita Chandra is vice president and director of RAND Social and Economic Well-Being and a senior policy researcher at the RAND Corporation. She served as director of RAND Justice, Infrastructure and Environment and as director of RAND's Behavioral and Policy Sciences Department. She leads studies on civic well-being and urban planning; community resilience and long-term disaster recovery; effects of military deployment; health in all policies and advancing a culture of health; and child health and development. Dr. Chandra is currently a member of the NASEM Committee on Measuring Community Resilience. Throughout her career, Dr. Chandra has engaged government and nongovernmental partners to consider cross-sector solutions for improving community well-being and to build more robust systems and evaluation capacity. This work has taken many forms, including engaging with federal and local government agencies on building systems for emergency preparedness and resilience both in the U.S. and globally; partnering with private sector organizations to develop the science base around child systems; and collaborating with city governments and foundations to reform data systems and measure environmental sustainability, well-being, and civic transformation. Dr. Chandra has also partnered with community organizations to conduct broad-scale health and environmental needs assessments, to examine the integration of health and human service systems, and to determine how to address the needs of historically marginalized populations in human service systems. These projects have occurred in partnership with businesses, foundations, and other community organizations. Dr. Chandra earned a Dr.P.H. in Population and Family Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, an M.P.H. in Maternal and Child Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health, and a B.A. in Child Development fromTufts University.
 

Mr. Daniel Cotter
Director of the First Responders Group in the Science and Technology Directorate at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Daniel Cotter is the Director of the First Responders Group in the Science and Technology Directorate at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He leads programs for first responder advanced personal protective equipment, communications interoperability, incident information sharing, situational awareness, and disaster resiliency. Mr. Cotter has coordinated with international partners through bilateral and other agreements and designed and oversaw the Next Generation First Responder Apex Program, with the ultimate goal of creating technologies required to support a first responder of the future.
 

Dr. Susan Cutter
Professor of Geography, University of South Carolina

Susan Cutter is a Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina where she directs the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute. Her primary research interests are in the area of disaster vulnerability/resilience science—what makes people and the places where they live vulnerable to extreme events and how vulnerability and resilience are measured, monitored, and assessed. She has authored or edited thirteen books, more than 150 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Dr. Cutter has led post-disaster field studies of the role of geographic information technologies in rescue and relief operations in (September 11th World Trade Center attack) and studies of evacuation behavior from Three Mile Island (1979), Hurricane Floyd (1999), and the Graniteville, SC train derailment and chlorine spill (2005). In 2006 she led a Hurricane Katrina post-event field team and ensuing five-year study to examine the long term recovery along the Mississippi Coast. In 2012, she led a Hurricane Sandy recovery team to examine the differential recovery along New Jersey’s coast. She has provided expert testimony to Congress on hazards and vulnerability, was a member of the US Army Corps of Engineers IPET team evaluating the social impacts of the New Orleans and Southeast Louisiana Hurricane Protection System in response to Hurricane Katrina, and was a juror for the Rebuild by Design competition for Hurricane Sandy reconstruction. Her policy-relevant work focuses on emergency management and disaster recovery at local, state, national, and international levels, with funding from NSF, the US Army Corps of Engineers, NOAA, NASA, USGS, FEMA, DHS, South Carolina’s Emergency Management Division (EMD) and State Law Enforcement Division (SLED), and Florida’s Department of Health. Dr. Cutter serves on many national advisory boards and committees including those of National Research Council (NRC), the AAAS, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Natural Hazards Center, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). She also served as Vice-Chair of the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR) Science Committee supported by ISSC, ICSU, and UN-ISDR. Dr. Cutter serves as co-executive editor of Environment, associate editor of Weather, Climate, and Society, and on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Extreme Events. She also is serving as the Editor-in-Chief for the Oxford Research Encyclopedias Natural Hazard Science. She received her B.A. from California State University, East Bay and her M.A. and Ph.D. (1976) from the University of Chicago.


Dr. Tamara Dickinson
President, Science Matters Consulting, LLC

Tamara Dickinson is the founder and president of Science Matters Consulting. Dr. Dickinson has had a distinguished career formulating national policy, providing leadership, promoting collaboration, and fostering consensus. She has built and maintains strong collaborative relationships with a broad range of federal and state officials, academia, and industry leaders. Throughout her career, Dr. Dickinson has built coalitions that encourage organizations to share research results and technology for decision-making. Dr. Dickinson’s career began as a research scientist focusing on the origin and evolution of the moon and meteorites. More recently Dr. Dickinson has held leadership positions in government and science organizations. Dr. Dickinson led the Environment and Energy Division at the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the White House. There, she coordinated the Federal Government’s activities to better prepare the U.S. for the impacts of climate change, to promote sustainable development, to foster new and cleaner sources of energy, to enable the Earth and space sciences, and to build the nation’s disaster resilience. Dr. Dickinson oversaw the National Ocean Council, U.S. Global Change Research Program, and interagency committees on earth observing, air and water quality, disaster risk reduction, space weather, ecological services, toxins, the Arctic and, ocean science and technology. She has also held leadership positions at the U.S. Geological Survey, National Academies, National Science Foundation, and NASA Headquarters. Dr. Dickinson earned her Ph.D. and M.S. from the University of New Mexico and her B.A. from the University of Northern Iowa.

Mr. John Dorman
Assistant State Emergency Management Director for Risk Management, State of North Carolina

John Dorman is the Assistant State Emergency Management Director for Risk Management. In this capacity, he is responsible for all design, build, acquisition, analysis, and dissemination of data, models, analysis, systems and applications associated with hazard risk management. Mr. Dorman previously served as the Deputy Director of the Office of State Policy and Planning and later as the Statewide Planning Administrator for the Office of State Budget, Planning, and Management. Following Hurricane Floyd in 1999, North Carolina petitioned FEMA and became the first state in the nation to be designated a Cooperating Technical State. From this designation, the North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program was created and placed under his supervision. In 2009, Mr. Dorman was given the expanded responsibility of implementing a statewide risk management framework of data, process, systems and applications associated with natural, accidental and intentional hazards. Mr. Dorman has managed a number of statewide initiatives, including the statewide acquisition of LiDAR-derived topographic data, digital orthophotography, building footprints, and special flood hazard areas. Mr. Dorman has also managed three national risk management demonstrations: Integrated Hazard Risk Management; Digital Flood Risk Management; and, Sea Level Rise Impact Study. He is currently the Chair of the national Technical Mapping Advisory Council.


Mr. James Gore
Chairman, Sonoma County Board of Supervisors

James Gore is the Fourth District Supervisor for the County of Sonoma in California. His district was hard hit by the 2017 Tubbs Fire, which destroyed more than 5,600 structures and took 22 lives, and Mr. Gore has emerged as a force for resilience both in Sonoma County and throughout the region. Mr. Gore is the chair of the Resilient Counties initiative and currently serves as second vice president for the California State Association of Counties, he also serves as the nationwide chair of the Resilient Counties Advisory Board (RCAB) for the National Association of Counties (NACo). Previously, he secured an appointment from President Barack Obama’s administration as Assistant Chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). During this service, Mr. Gore led nationwide conservation efforts at the intersection of agriculture, business, and the environment. In an effort to enhance both a vibrant economy and protect our nation’s natural resources, Mr. Gore advocated for and led efforts to expand services in persistent poverty areas with underserved communities – leading to the creation and deployment of USDA’s persistent poverty initiative, StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity. Mr. Gore also helped lead efforts on climate change mitigation and the protection of Pacific salmon habitats. Mr. Gore earned a master’s degree from George Washington University and a bachelor’s degree in Agribusiness from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.
 

Mr. Mike Grimm
Assistant Administrator, Risk Management Directorate, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal Emergency Management Agency

Mike Grimm serves as the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Assistant Administrator for Risk Management within the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA). Throughout his more than 20-year career at FEMA, Mr. Grimm has worked to improve coordination, collaboration, and transparency across the various levels of government, to align the larger national mitigation policy agenda on reducing risk nationally and creating more disaster-resilient communities. Mr. Grimm was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in 2011. Under Mr. Grimm’s direction, the Risk Management Directorate delivers quality risk data, modeling, and programs that increase the public's awareness of risk across the range of natural hazards. Mr. Grimm directs FEMA’s Risk Management programs ensuring the Federal Government is a leader in prioritizing federal investments for mitigation and resilience, implementing higher codes and standards for federal action, and assisting communities in reducing disaster costs. These programs include the Risk Mapping, Analysis, and Planning (RiskMAP) Program which includes the Flood Hazard Mapping Program under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), the Building Sciences Program, the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP), and the National Dam Safety Program. He also directs the national hazard mitigation planning requirements under the Stafford Act and FEMA’s actuarial and catastrophic modeling responsibilities. Additionally, the Risk Management Directorate is responsible for the inter-agency Mitigation Framework Leadership Group (MitFLG) that coordinates mitigation and resilience efforts across the Federal Government in consultation with state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) governments as well as the private sector including the development of the National Mitigation Investment Strategy (NMIS). From 2014-2018, Mr. Grimm directed FEMA’s pre- and post-disaster mitigation programs that support sustainable, disaster-resilient communities, to avoid or reduce the loss of life, property, and financial impacts of natural hazards. These programs included the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, the Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant Program, the Flood Mitigation Assistance grants, the Floodplain Management component of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), and the Community Rating System under the NFIP. In addition, Mr. Grimm led the hazard mitigation disaster workforce cadre and overall disaster operations for the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration. From 2011-2014, Mr. Grimm directed FEMA’s Individual Assistance Division and was responsible for FEMA disaster response and recovery programs including the Individuals and Households Program, the Temporary Housing Program, Disaster Case Management Program, Crisis Counseling Program, Disaster Unemployment Assistance Program, Disaster Legal Services, Emergency Food and Shelter Program, as well as Mass Care and Emergency Assistance under Emergency Support Function #6 of the National Response Framework. He served as co-Chair (with American Red Cross and National Voluntary Agencies Active in Disasters (NVOAD)) of the Mass Care Council and as FEMA representative on Board of Directors for NVOAD. Prior to joining FEMA, Mr. Grimm worked in other governmental positions including with the City of Fort Collins, Colorado, emergency and floodplain management program; with the State of Wyoming, Department of Environmental Quality; and for the United States Geological Survey, National Research Program, in Denver, Colorado. Mr. Grimm holds a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Vermont and a Master of Science in Earth Resources from Colorado State University. Mr. Grimm also received a certificate in Public Leadership from the Brookings Institution and Washington University in St. Louis, Olin Business School.


Dr. Geoffrey Heal
Professor of Economics, Columbia Business School

Geoffrey Heal, Donald C. Waite III Professor of Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, is noted for contributions to economic theory and resource and environmental economics. He holds bachelors (first class), masters and doctoral degrees from Cambridge University, where he studied at Churchill College and taught at Christ’s College. He also holds an Honorary Doctorate from the Universite´ de Paris Dauphine. Author of eighteen books and about two hundred articles, Professor Heal is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, Past President of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, recipient of its prize for publications of enduring quality and a Life Fellow, a Director of the Union of Concerned Scientists and a founder and Director and chairman of the Board of the Coalition for Rainforest Nations, developers of the REDD policy for reducing deforestation by awarding carbon credits for forest conservation. Recent books include Nature and the Marketplace, Valuing the Future, When Principles Pay and Whole Earth Economics (forthcoming). Professor Heal chaired a committee of the National Academy of Sciences on valuing ecosystem services, was a Commissioner of the Pew Oceans Commission, is a coordinating lead author of the IPCC, was a member of President Sarkozy’s Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress, was a member of the advisory board for the World Bank’s 2010 World Development Report and the United Nations Environment Program’s 2011 Human Development Report, and acts as an advisor to the World Bank on its Green Growth project. He is also a Director of Public Business, a foundation that promotes in-depth public interest journalism and a member of the Advisory Board of Green Seal. He has been a principal in two start-up companies, a consulting firm and a software and telecommunications company, and until recently was a member of the Investment Committee of a green private equity group. He teaches MBA courses on “Current Developments in Energy Markets,” “Business and Society: Doing Well by Doing Good?” and “The Business of Sustainability,” teaches a doctoral course on advanced microeconomic theory, and advises doctoral students interested in sustainability.
 

Dr. Kevin P. Heaslip
Associate Professor, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Kevin Heaslip is an Associate Professor in the Via Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Utah State University. He was previously the Associate Director of the Utah Transportation Center and the Mountain Plains Consortium (Region 8 University Transportation Center) in his position at Utah State University. His research interests include vehicle electrification and automation, alternative fuels for transportation, sustainable and resilient transportation infrastructures, and traffic operations. Dr. Heaslip has completed research for several major organizations including: The U.S. Department of Transportation, the U.S. Department of Defense, the National Cooperative Highway Research Program, and is currently working a US Department of Energy funded project on Automated Electric Transportation. Dr. Heaslip has received recognition by the Transportation Research Board three years running with the designation of three papers as Practice Ready Papers. USU also has recognized his research by naming him the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Researcher of the Year and Undergraduate Research Mentor of the year twice. He was also awarded the College of Engineering Undergraduate Research Mentor of the Year in 2011. USU’s Energy Dynamics Laboratory named him their Engineering Collaborator of the Year in 2010 for his work with wireless power transfer and vehicle automation. Dr. Heaslip has published 20 refereed journal publications, 30 refereed conference proceedings, and received research grants as Principal Investigator or co-Principal Investigator in the value of $6.8 million dollars. Dr. Heaslip graduated from Virginia Tech with a BSCE and MSCE in 2002 and 2003 respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2007.
 

Dr. Quintus Jett
Assistant Professor, Rutgers University

Quintus Jett is an Assistant Professor at Rutgers University (Newark) in the School of Public Affairs and Administration (SPAA), in conjunction with the Rutgers Business School’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development (CUEED). Dr. Jett received his doctorate in Organizations and Management from Stanford University’s School of Engineering. He also holds a master’s in Industrial Engineering from Stanford, and is an alumnus of the University of Pennsylvania. He began his professional career at IBM, and worked for several years at Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA center managed by the California Institute of Technology. At Rutgers, Dr. Jett teaches related topics such as social entrepreneurship, management consulting, public administration, and public service organizations. Previously he has been a faculty member at both Rice University and Dartmouth College.


Dr. Susan W. Kieffer (NAS)
Emeritus Professor of Geology and Physics, Center for Advanced Study, & Charles R. Walgreen Chair, Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Susan Kieffer is the Emeritus Professor of Geology and the Center for Advanced Study and Charles R. Walgreen Chairs Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Kieffer is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship. Her research focuses on geological fluid dynamics in diverse areas such as volcanology, river hydraulics, and meteorite impact dynamics. She has also worked on sustainability issues. She was a geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey for ten years and has served on numerous National Research Council committees and boards, including the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, the Board on Science Education, and the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Geological Sciences. Dr. Kieffer earned her M.S. in geological sciences and her Ph.D. in planetary sciences from California Institute of Technology. She is the author of the trade science book "The Dynamics of Disaster" (W.W. Norton, 2013), in which she discusses the science underlying various disasters – volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, rogue waves, tornados, hurricanes, etc. To deal with the increasing impacts of these events on our vulnerable populations, she proposes the concept of a global body, the Center for Disaster Control for Planet Earth (CDC-PE) modeled after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


Ms. Ann Lesperance
Director of Northwest Regional Technology Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Director of College of Social Sciences and Humanities Program, Northeastern University

Ann Lesperance is the Director of the Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where she is developing regional programs to accelerate the demonstration and deployment of new Homeland Security technologies. Ms. Lesperance works with state and local emergency responders and public safety officials to understand and help prioritize their operational needs and requirements. Ms. Lesperance is also the Director of the College of Social Sciences and Humanities at Northeastern University Seattle campus where she is building programs on security and resilience studies and urban informatics. She brings to both roles a specialty in evaluating issues from a technical, public policy, and national security perspective. Her main area of interest is emergency management and technology development and deployment for innovative homeland security technologies. Her interest in the response enterprise spans domestic and international response to disasters of all types in light of today’s and future disruptive technologies. In her nearly 30 years of service to the national security enterprise, Ms. Lesperance has collaborated with key regional partners in building productive partnerships to advance technology development and deployment for innovative homeland security, emergency preparedness, and environmental technologies. Ms. Lesperance is a recognized leader in response, recovery, and resiliency issues, having been selected to serve on a National Academy of Science Steering Committee exploring a "whole of government" approach to international CBRNE events. Additionally, Ms. Lesperance has played key leadership roles in engaging the public and private sector energy and public safety sectors on issues related to cybersecurity and resiliency. She is leading a state-wide effort to develop an open-source information-sharing platform to enhance response and recovery from cyberattacks. Ms. Lesperance holds an M.S.in Public Health from the UCLA School of Public Health, Environmental Science and Engineering Program and a B.A. in Environmental Science and Latin American Studies from the University of Wisconsin.
 

Dr. Kristin Ludwig
Staff Scientist, Natural Hazards Mission Area, U.S. Geological Survey

Kris Ludwig is a Staff Scientist in the Natural Hazards Mission Area of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) where she contributes to multiple efforts in hazard preparedness, response, and recovery. She staffs the Department of the Interior Strategic Sciences Group (SSG), which rapidly assembles multidisciplinary teams of scientists to assess environmental crises and deliver actionable results to decision makers. Most recently, Ludwig co-led the SSG deployment in response to Hurricane Sandy. Prior to her current position, Ludwig served as a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at both the National Science Foundation and USGS; managed communications for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program; and developed education programs and exhibits for the Pacific Science Center. Ludwig has taught earth science policy at George Mason University and her interests range from improving the application of science during crisis to deep sea exploration and STEM education. Ludwig holds a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Washington and a B.S. in Earth Systems from Stanford University.


Mr. David Miller
Independent Contractor

David Miller is currently a sector coordinator for the Regulatory and Fuels Sectors of the Electric Infrastructure Security Council (EIS), a private non-profit entity whose mission is to host national and international collaboration on resilience and whole community restoration and response planning, addressing severe, national and global scale hazards to lifeline infrastructures. Previously, Mr. Miller served as FEMA’s associate administrator for the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA) from September 2011 until his retirement in April 2015. He was responsible for development, implementation and execution of flood insurance and mitigation program policy. This included the reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program and the establishment of the Mitigation Framework Leadership Group. Program areas included Risk Mapping Assessment and Planning; National Dam Safety; Multi-Hazard Mitigation Planning; various Mitigation and Flood Insurance Mitigation programs; National Earthquake Reduction; Community Rating System; Building Science; Floodplain Management and Community Assistance; and Environmental and Historic Preservation programs. From 2004 to 2011, Mr. Miller served as the Administrator of the Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division. During his tenure he served as the governor’s authorized representative for eleven President-declared major disasters, including the 2008 flooding disaster that historically was the largest disaster to occur in the State of Iowa and, at that time, was the fifth largest public assistance disaster in the United States. Under Mr. Miller’s leadership, Iowa was one of only a handful of states to achieve national accreditation under the Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) and was one of only 12 states to have a federally approved enhanced mitigation plan. Mr. Miller is a board member for Adjusters International. He has served as a member or leader in a number of State and national groups, including co-chair of the Federal Interagency Floodplain Management Task Force; chair of the Mitigation Framework Leadership Group; former member of the National Advisory Council; and served terms as the vice president and president of the National Emergency Management Association. Mr. Miller is a graduate of the Naval Post Graduate School Executive Leadership Program and has an A.A. from Kirkwood Community College.


Mr. Steve Moddemeyer
Principal, CollinsWoerman Architects

Steve Moddemeyer is a thought leader with more than 23 years of experience leading governments, land owners, and project teams towards increased sustainability. He creates tools and policies that implement resilience principles into planning for land use and urban infrastructure. He works on climate change adaptation, sustainability strategies for large urban redevelopments, and advanced sustainability strategies for land owners, cities, counties, utilities, and tribes. Moddemeyer helped to guide development of the Resilient Design Performance Standard for Infrastructure for Boulder County and cities; and advises the National Academy of Sciences’ Resilient America Pilot Project in Seattle. Moddemeyer has a Bachelors Degree in Landscape Architecture from the University of Washington.


Mr. Brooks Nelson
Director, Global Resilience, US Chamber of Commerce Foundation

Brooks Nelson manages the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation Corporate Citizenship Center’s Disaster Preparedness, Relief, and Recovery program. In this position, Nelson leads programming around the private sector’s role in disaster preparedness and community resiliency. Brooks also coordinates the Center’s response to natural and man-made disasters through the Corporate Aide Tracker, business delegation trips, and coordination calls. In addition to leading the global resilience program, he also supports the execution and management of the annual Corporate Citizenship Awards. Nelson began working with Corporate Citizenship Center in March 2009 as a researcher for the Together for Recovery campaign. Previously, Nelson was the senior manager for operations at the Center where he was responsible for the day to day management of the center as well as directing event logistics. He has also served as coordinator for the Business and Society Relations program where he was the lead for the 10th Anniversary of 9/11. For this significant anniversary, the Center helped mobilize and track over 911 projects completed by businesses and chambers across the country. Prior to joining the Center, Nelson was with USA Freedom Corps, the civic engagement office of the White House under the Bush Administration. Nelson is a graduate of Iowa State University where he holds two bachelor of science degrees, one in Public Service and Administration and the other in Apparel Merchandising, Design, and Production with an emphasis in creative design. Brooks is originally from New Providence, Iowa.


Dr. Lori Peek
Professor, Department of Sociology, Director of Natural Hazards Center, University of Colorado – Boulder

Lori Peek is director of the Natural Hazards Center and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. She studies vulnerable populations in disaster and is author of Behind the Backlash: Muslim Americans after 9/11, co-editor of Displaced: Life in the Katrina Diaspora, and co-author of Children of Katrina. Behind the Backlash received the Distinguished Book Award from the Midwest Sociological Society and the Best Book Award from the American Sociological Association Section on Altruism, Morality, and Social Solidarity. Children of Katrina received the Best Book Award from the American Sociological Association Section on Children and Youth and the Alfred and Betty McClung Best Book Award from the Association for Humanist Sociologists, and was named a finalist for the Colorado Book Awards. Peek also helped develop and write school safety guidance for the nation, which resulted in the publication of FEMA P-1000, Safer, Stronger, Smarter: A Guide to Improving School Natural Hazard Safety. Peek has conducted field investigations in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Hurricane Katrina, the BP Oil Spill, the Christchurch earthquakes, the Joplin tornado, Superstorm Sandy, and Hurricane Matthew. She is currently leading a National Science Foundation-funded project to establish two initiatives for the hazards and disaster research community: the Social Science Extreme Events Reconnaissance (SSEER) and Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Extreme Events Reconnaissance (ISEEER) platform and network. She is also leading an evaluation research project for Save the Children and co-leading a National Science Foundation effort on interdisciplinary disaster research methods. She is a member of the social science team for the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center of Excellence for Risk Based Community Resilience Planning. She is also working on several ongoing projects related to children’s health and well-being before, during, and after disaster. Her work has appeared in a variety of scholarly outlets including Disasters, Risk Analysis, Natural Hazards, Natural Hazards Review, International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, Child Development, Journal of Family Studies, Sociological Inquiry, Qualitative Research, and Children, Youth and Environments. In 2016, Peek received honorable mention for the Leo Goodman Award for Outstanding Contributions to Sociological Methodology from the American Sociological Association Section on Methodology. And in 2009, the American Sociological Association Section on Children and Youth honored her with the Early Career Award for Outstanding Scholarship. In addition to the recognition for her scholarship, Peek has received nearly a dozen awards for her teaching and mentoring. Perhaps most notably, in 2016, she received the Board of Governor's Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award, which is the highest teaching honor bestowed at her former institution, Colorado State University. Peek regularly works with graduate and undergraduate research and teaching assistants, and has mentored numerous doctoral and master's students over the past decade. At the University of Colorado Boulder, she teaches a graduate seminar on Hazards, Disasters, and Society, and a large 425 student Introduction to Sociology class. Peek is the President of the Research Committee on Disasters for the International Sociological Association and is past Chair of the American Sociological Association Section on Environment and Technology. She is co-PI for the National Science Foundation Minority SURGE Capacity in Disasters project, and is a Board Member for the William Averette Anderson Fund; both initiatives are dedicated to increasing the number of underrepresented professionals in hazards and disaster research and practice. She is an appointed member of the National Academies Resilience Roundtable, a member of the oversight committee for the Mitigation Saves 2.0 update study, and a federally-appointed member of the Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR) for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). Peek earned her PhD in Sociology from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2005. She was a research assistant at the Natural Hazards Center from 1999-2005, and a faculty member at Colorado State University from 2005-2016.


Mr. Chris Poland (NAE)
Consulting Engineer, Chris D. Poland Consulting Engineer

Chris Poland, NAE, is a consulting engineer who is an internationally recognized authority on earthquake engineering and champion of disaster resilience. His focus is on community resilience and the buildings and systems that contribute to it. He is the past chair of the Advisory Committee to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, and current chairman of the Advisory Committee on Structural Safety of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Facilities. He served as the chair of the American Society of Civil Engineers Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings Standards Committee completing multiple editions both ASCE 31 and ASCE 41, standards for the evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings that are used worldwide. He served on the Board of Directors for SPUR, co-chaired their Resilient City Initiative and led the publication of “The Disaster Resilient City”. He is a past president, treasurer, and director of the Earthquake Engineering Research Instituted and is currently a member of the Seismic Resilience Panel that oversees the institutes NSF Resilient Observatory Grant. Chris is a former vice-chairman of the American Council of Engineering Companies, member of the Board of Governors of the ASCE Structural Engineering Institute and was appointed to the Executive Committee overseeing the new ASCE Infrastructure Resilience Division. Currently, Mr. Poland is a disaster resilience fellow in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and member of the team of authors that developed a Community Resilience Planning Guide. His role is related to defining and preparing the over-arching guidance for the development of Community Disaster Resilience Plans by local communities. That framework is the initiating document for the NIST Community Resilience Program that will include the development of related standards, analytical tools, and model guidelines for use by cities nationwide to address the natural disasters they face. Mr. Poland was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2009. He is a fellow of the American Council of Engineering Companies, the Structural Engineers Association of California and the American Society of Civil Engineers Structural Engineering Institute. He is also an honorary member of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute and the Structural Engineers Association of California. Mr. Poland holds an M.S. in Structural Engineering from Stanford University and a B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Redlands.


Mr. Otis Rolley
Managing Director, Economic Resilience & Operations, US Jobs & Economic Opportunity

Otis Rolley is the managing director of Economic Resilience & Operations, US Jobs & Economic Opportunity, at The Rockefeller Foundation. Most recently, the former Director of North America for 100 Resilient Cities, Mr. Rolley brings to Foundation an entire career dedicated toward resilience and urban development in the private, non-profit and public sectors. He has worked in housing, community economic development, strategic planning, performance management, municipal administration, urban, regional and transportation planning. Prior to joining 100RC, Mr. Rolley served as CEO of Newark, NJ’s economic development corporation. He was a senior manager at a national public-sector management consultant firm leading their strategic planning, change and performance management work in municipalities and large urban school districts. He also was the founding president of a regional nonprofit dedicated to improving and expanding transit and transportation options for Central Maryland. Mr. Rolley’s extensive public sector experience includes serving in various leadership positions with five different mayors in three large US cities. He has been a chief of staff managing a $2 billion budget; city planning director for the America’s largest independent city; and he has served as 1st deputy housing commissioner for the 5th largest public housing and community development agency in the US. Mr. Rolley has an M.S. from M.I.T. and a B.A. from Rutgers University.


Dr. Monica Schoch-Spana
Senior Scholar, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

Monica Schoch-Spana, a medical anthropologist, is a Senior Scholar with the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. She holds faculty positions at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Department of Anthropology at Texas State University, and the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START). Her areas of expertise include community resilience to disaster, public engagement in policymaking, crisis and risk communication, and public health emergency preparedness. Since 1998, Dr. Schoch-Spana has briefed federal, state, and local officials, as well as medical, public health, and public safety professionals, on critical issues in health security. National advisory roles include currently serving on the Homeland Security Subcommittee of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Resilient America Roundtable of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), and the NASEM Standing Committee on Medical and Public Health Research during Large-Scale Emergency Events. Dr. Schoch-Spana has led research, education, and advocacy efforts to encourage authorities to enlist the public’s contributions in epidemic and disaster management. Her studies have been influential in debunking myths about mass behaviors in the context of bioterrorism, reframing the management of catastrophic health events to include social and ethical-moral dimensions, and persuading leaders to share governance dilemmas with the public including how to allocate scarce medical resources in a disaster. She has chaired national working groups to produce peer-reviewed, evidence-based consensus guidance for authorities on how to partner with citizens and civil society in relation to bioterrorism response, influenza pandemic planning, and nuclear incident preparedness, and she has organized 3 national meetings on how to strengthen community resilience to extreme health events. From 2003 to 2017, Dr. Schoch-Spana worked at the UPMC Center for Health Security; prior to that she worked at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies, starting in 1998. She received her PhD in cultural anthropology from Johns Hopkins University (1998) and a BA from Bryn Mawr College (1986).

Dr. Ross S. Stein
Cofounder and CEO of Temblor

Ross Stein is cofounder and CEO of Temblor, a tech company providing a personal, immediate and credible source of seismic risk understanding and solutions for everyone. Temblor will estimate the likelihood of seismic shaking and home damage and then show how the damage or its costs could be decreased by buying or renting a seismically safe home, securing fragile objects inside your home, retrofitting an older home, or buying earthquake insurance. Dr. Stein studies how earthquakes interact by the transfer of stress. He is the Winter 2014 Distinguished Lecturer of the Stanford School of Earth Sciences, and received the 2012 Gilbert F. White Natural Hazards Award of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He is President-Elect of the 2500-member Tectonophysics section of AGU. He gave a 2012 TEDx talk, ‘Defeating Earthquakes,’ and was keynote speaker for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching in 2006. Dr. Ross has carried out research for NASA, FEMA, U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, Swiss Re and Zurich Insurance Group. Dr. Stein is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the Geological Society of America, was Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research in 1986-89, and later chaired AGU’s Board of Journal Editors. He received the Eugene M. Shoemaker Distinguished Achievement Award of the USGS, the Excellence in Outreach Award of the Southern California Earthquake Center, and the Outstanding Contributions and Cooperation in Geoscience Award from NOAA. In 2009 Ross cofounded the Global Earthquake Model (GEM Foundation), a public-private partnership building the world's first global seismic risk model, and chaired GEM’s Science Board until 2015. Ross has appeared in many documentary films, including the Emmy-nominated documentary, ‘Killer Quake’ (NOVA, 1995), the four-part ‘Great Quakes’ series (Discovery, 1997-2001), and the multiple award-winning 2004 National Geographic IMAX movie ‘Forces of Nature,’ which he helped to write and animate. Dr. Stein received his Ph.D. in geology from Stanford University.


Dr. Eric Tate
Associate Professor, University of Iowa

Eric Tate is an associate professor of Geography at the University of Iowa. His research lies at the confluence of environmental hazards and society, primarily through the development of geospatial models of flood hazards, vulnerability, and resilience. He believes that the prevailing structure of hazards research and practice, as either physical or social, is artificial. And that 'natural' disasters result from interactions and feedbacks between physical and social processes, so hazards research should reflect this reality. His research interests fall into three general areas: (1) indicators of vulnerability, resilience, and sustainability; (2) flood hazard mitigation; and (3) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for geospatial models. Dr. Tate is also a member of the University of Iowa water sustainability cluster, and faculty affiliate with IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering and the Center for Global and Environmental Research.Dr. Tate is also a current member of the Committee on Urban Flooding in the United States. Dr. Tate earned a Ph.D in Geography from the University of South Carolina, an M.S. in Environmental & Water Resources Engineering from The University of Texas, and a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from Rice University.


Dr. Erin Walsh
Program Manager, Relational, Adaptive Processing of Information and Display (RAPID) Apex, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security

Erin Walsh currently serves as the program manager of the Relational, Adaptive Processing of Information and Display (RAPID) Apex on behalf the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T). She also leads DHS S&T’s efforts related to the development of research and development activities associated with Presidential Policy Directive 21 (PPD-21) Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience. Prior to joining S&T, Dr. Walsh managed mitigation projects related to building science, infrastructure, and community resilience at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). She also led SME groups conducting forensic engineering studies in response to major disasters as part of FEMA’s Mitigation Assessment Team (MAT) program and was a member of the National Response Coordination Staff (NRCS). Dr. Walsh also worked as a consultant in energy, environment and defense-related areas. She received her undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from Princeton University. Her master’s degrees in environmental management and environmental science and doctorate in industrial ecology are from Yale University. Her doctoral research focused on ways to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of urban infrastructure systems in the face of major disruptions by natural hazards, both episodic and lasting.
 

Dr. David Yoskowitz
Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Chair and Professor, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

David Yoskowitz brings a socio-economic perspective to issues that impact the greater Gulf of Mexico region and beyond. His work is focused on elucidating the link between environmental well-being and human well-being and moving practice into policy. He is leading an effort to inventory and value ecosystem services for the Gulf of Mexico region and quantifying the impact of sea-level rise on coastal community resiliency. His work has taken him through much of North and Central America including Cuba, Nicaragua, Belize, El Salvador, and Mexico. He led the effort to produce Gulf 360: State of the Gulf of Mexico, which was a successful collaboration between governmental, academic, non-governmental organizations, and industry in both the United States and Mexico that mapped common socio-economic metrics. Dr. Yoskowitz served as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Chief Economist, 2014-2015. He also served on the National Research Council Committee on the Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Mississippi Canyon-252 Oil Spill on Ecosystem Services in the Gulf of Mexico and the Socio-Economic Scientific and Statistical Committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. Dr. Yoskowitz has received a Ph.D. in Economics from Texas Tech University, an M.A. in Economics from Texas Tech University, and a B.A. in Economics & Finance from Bentley College.











 
 

PGA_086604PGA_086407PGA_086405PGA_086233PGA_086235pga_185588PGA_183886PGA_086234PGA_167811PGA_152193PGA_167401