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BISO Home > USNC/IUGG Homepage > 2013 and 2012 AAAS Symposia

2013 AAAS Symposium – “U.S. Climate and Weather Extremes: Past, Present, and Future"
This session was sponsored by the four USNCs for the Earth Sciences and spearheaded by USNC/INQUA. The symposium provided both current and paleoclimatic perspectives on the nature of recent extreme climate and weather events and their societal and ecological impacts, with a focus on the United States. The symposium was held on February 15, 2013 at the AAAS meeting in Boston, Massachusetts. Speakers included:

  • Donald J. Wuebbles (University of Illinois): Severe Weather in the United States Under a Changing Climate
  • Andrew Freedman (Climate Central): Coverage of Extreme Weather/Climate Events in a Changing Media Landscape
  • John Nielsen-Gammon (Texas A&M University): What Did the Texas Drought Do?
  • Camille Parmesan (University of Texas): Observed Impacts of Extreme Climate Events on Wild Species
  • David Stahle (University of Arkansas): The Tree-Ring Record of Drought and Disaster Over North America
  • Richard Seager (Columbia University): A Modeling Perspective on Drought in Southwest North America

Organizer: Connie Woodhouse, University of Arizona
Co-organizers: Gregory Wiles, The College of Wooster and Ester Sztein, U.S. National Academies
Discussants: Kathy Jacobs, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the U.S. President 

If you would like to receive a CD containing the audio and presentations, please contact BISO@nas.edu.

Audio of Session (MP3)

Presentations (PDF Format):

John Nielsen-Gammon
Professor
Texas A&M University
David Stahle
Professor
University of Arkansas
Richard Seager
Palisades Geophysical Institute/Lamont Research Professor
Columbia University

Press from “U.S. Climate and Weather Extremes: Past, Present, and Future":

AAAS Member Central: "Donald Wuebbles: Severe weather trends clearly linked to climate change"
AAAS News: "Scientists Say Wild Weather Is Here to Stay"
Digital Times: "The U.S. has to get used to extreme weather warn scientists"
University of Arkansas Newswire: "Tree-Ring Data Show History, Pattern to Droughts"
University of Illinois News Bureau: "Climate change's costly wild weather consequences"


2012 AAAS Symposium - “Causes and Effects of Relative Sea-Level Changes in the Northeast Pacific"

This session, spearheaded by the U.S. National Committee for Geodesy and Geophysics, first reviewed the various contributing factors to relative sea-level changes in the Northeast Pacific and then examined likely adaptations with an emphasis on shores in British Columbia. The symposium was held February 19, 2012 at the AAAS meeting in Vancouver, Canada. Speakers included:

  • John J. Clague (Simon Fraser University): Impacts of Rising Seas on the British Columbia Coast in the 21st Century
  • Denise J. Reed (University of New Orleans): Surviving Sea-Level Rise: What Can Be Done To Maintain Viable Coastal Wetlands?
  • David Flanders (University of British Columbia): Flood Adaptation Near Vancouver: A Regional Adaptation Collaborative

Organizer: Brian F. Atwater, U.S. Geological Survey
Co-organizers: C.K. Shum, Ohio State University and Ester Sztein, The National Academies
Moderator: Brian F. Atwater, U.S. Geological Survey
Discussant: Margaret Davidson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal Services Center

If you would like to receive a CD containing the audio and presentations, please contact BISO@nas.edu.

 Audio of Session (MP3)

Presentations (PDF Format):

John J. Clague
Professor
Simon Fraser University

David Flanders
Research Scientist / Landscape Planner
University of British Columbia

Denise J. Reed
Professor
University of New Orleans

Press from "Causes and Effects of Relative Sea-Level Changes in the Northeast Pacific":

Vancouver Sun (PDF): "South Delta needs dramatic solutions to flood risks"
The Vancouver Sun (blog): "Sea level rise threats growing with global warming, AAAS hears"
News24: "Coasts in risk plan ahead for rising seas"
Winnipeg Free Press: "BC scientist says people can either 'defend' or retreat from rising seas"
Discovery News: "Planning for a Devastating Sea Level Rise"
South Delta Leader: "Act now to prevent flood conditions in South Delta, warns SFU geologist"
RedOrbit: "Visualizations Help Communities Plan For Sea-level Rise"
The Delta Optimist: "Sea level rise poses flood risk"
CBC News: "Sea level rise underestimated, say B.C. scientists"
Carbon Based Climate Change Adaptation (blog): "Sea level rise in the Northeast Pacific"
Agence France-Presse: "Coasts in peril plan ahead for rising seas" (this article also appears on The Mother Nature Network and Physorg.com)
CTV News: "Future floods could leave much of Delta under water"
isgtw (international science grid this week): "The Delta community in 2100"
Planetsave: "Visualising Sea-Level Rise Helps Communities Plan Ahead"
Richmond Review: "Scientists raise alarm over rising sea level threat"
UPI.com: "Visualization brings sea level rise alive"
redOrbit: "Visualizations Help Communities Plan For Sea-level Rise"


2012 AAAS Symposium - “Toward Stabilization of Net Global Carbon Dioxide Levels”
Sponsored by the four USNCs for the Earth Sciences and spearheaded by the U.S. National Committees for Soils and for Geodesy and Geophysics, this session provided a clear understanding and comparison of the attributes of the various sequestration strategies, including their capacity, economics, risks, application time-scales, and long-term stability. The symposium was held February 17, 2012 at the AAAS meeting in Vancouver, Canada. Speakers included:

  • Isabel Montañez (University of California): Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Climate Sensitivity in a Warmer World
  • Sally Benson (Stanford University): Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Deep Sedimentary Formations
  • Peter Brewer (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute): Impacts of Stabilizing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels: The Role of the Oceans
  • Keith Paustian (Colorado State University): Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Agriculture: Living Up to Potential?
  • Karen Haugen-Kozyra (KHK Consulting Ltd.): Carbon Pricing Policies in North America: Past, Present, and Future
  • Ben Yamagata (Coal Utilization Research Council): Managing Carbon Dioxide Emissions Today: An Industry Perspective

Organizer: Paul M. Bertsch, University of Kentucky
Co-Organizer: Ester Sztein, The National Academies
Discussants: James E. Hansen, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Cesar Izaurralde, Joint Global Change Research Institute

Presentations (PDF Format):

Sally Benson
Professor
Stanford University
Karen Haugen-Kozyra
Principal
KHK Consulting Ltd.
Isabel Montañez
Professor
University of California, Davis
Keith Paustian
Professor/Senior Research Scientist
Colorado State University

Press from "Toward Stabilization of Net Global Carbon Dioxide Levels":
UC Davis (blog): "Ancient climate expert joins AAAS panel on climate mitigation"
Web newswire: "Stanford scientist to discuss the challenges and opportunities of carbon sequestration at AAAS"
 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number GEO-0701397. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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