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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
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Upcoming EVENTS

Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine Celebrating Women in Science and Recognizing L’ORÉAL USA for Women in Science Fellows
October 24, 2018
Washington DC


Report Discussion

Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
June 26, 2018
Irvine, CA

More past events...

Contact Us

Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
Keck Center
500 5th Street NW
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: 202.334.2389
Fax: 202.334.2290
Email:
cwsem@nas.edu 

 


CWSEM Member Biographies


Joan Wennstrom Bennett (Chair) [NAS]
Distinguished Professor
Department of Plant Biology
Senior Advisor
Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics
Rutgers University

Joan Wennstrom Bennett, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Plant Biology and Pathology, and Senior Advisor in the Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics at Rutgers University. Dr. Bennett is a past president of the American Society for Microbiology and has done work in fungal genetics as well as in women’s studies. She taught a popular course Biology of Women beginning in 1976 while she was at Tulane University (1971-2006). She is currently a leader of her institution’s NSF ADVANCE project on women faculty. Dr. Bennett earned a bachelor’s degree in biology and history from Upsala College, and a master’s and doctorate degree in botany from the University of Chicago. She is a member of the NAS.


´╗┐Dr. Cristina Amon [NAE]
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and
Alumni Chair Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
University of Toronto

Dr. Cristina Amon has been Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Alumni Chair Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto (U of T) since 2006. Since her appointment, she has created programs to foster collaborative scholarship, enhance student experience, encourage active learning, promote multidisciplinary research excellence and accelerate innovation. Prior to joining U of T, Dr. Amon was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and Director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems (ICES) at Carnegie Mellon University.. She is a pioneer in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics for formulating and solving thermal design problems subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints. Dean Amon continues her research at the University of Toronto in nanoscale thermal transport in semiconductors, energy systems and biomedical devices. Amon received her Mechanical Engineering diploma from Simón Bolívar University and continued her education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she earned her MS and ScD degrees in 1985 and 1988, respectively.


Nancy Andrews [NAS/NAM]
Dean of the Duke University School of Medicine and
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs,
Nanaline H. Duke Professor of Pediatrics and
Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology


Nancy Andrews, MD, PhD, has been Dean of the Duke University School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs since October 2007. She is also Nanaline H. Duke Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology.  Prior to coming to Duke, Andrews was the George Richards Minot Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Senior Associate in Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston, and a Distinguished Physician of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Andrews also served as director of the Harvard-MIT MD-PhD Program and dean for Basic Sciences and Graduate Studies at Harvard Medical School. She was an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute for 13 years. Her research has focused on mammalian iron homeostasis and mouse models of human diseases. She has received numerous awards and prizes for research and mentoring. She served as the 2009 President of the American Society of Clinical Investigation. Andrews was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She currently serves on the Council of the National Academy of Medicine and the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In addition, she is the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and a member of the Board of Directors of Novartis International AG. Andrews received her BS and MS degrees in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University. She earned her PhD in Biology from MIT and her MD from Harvard Medical School through the Harvard Medical Scientist Training Program. She completed residency and fellowship training in Pediatrics and Hematology/Oncology at Children’s Hospital Boston and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and served as an attending physician at Children’s Hospital.


May Berenbaum [NAS]
Professor and Head of Entomology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

May Berenbaum, Ph.D., is Professor and Head of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is known for elucidating chemical mechanisms underlying interactions between insects and their host plants, including detoxification of natural and synthetic chemicals, and for applying ecological principles in developing sustainable management practices for natural and agricultural communities. She is a member of the NAS. Dr. Berenbaum received her Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University.


Emery Neal Brown [NAS/NAE/NAM]
Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia
Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts General Hospital

Emery Neal Brown is the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and a practicing anesthesiologist at MGH. At MIT he is the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and professor of computational neuroscience the Associate Director of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, and the Director of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Program. Brown is one of only 19 individuals who have been elected to all three branches of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Brown is also the first African American and first anesthesiologist to be elected to all three National Academies. Brown was the recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Minority Medical Faculty Development Fellowship, an NSF Minority Career Development Fellowship, National Institute of Mental Health Independent Scientist Award, America’s Leading Doctor Award from Black Enterprise Magazine, the Jerome Sacks Award from the National Institute of Statistical Sciences for Outstanding Cross Disciplinary Research, an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, an NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award, Guggenheim Fellowship, And the American Society of Anesthesiologists Award for Excellence in Research. Brown he received his B.A. (magna cum laude) in applied mathematics from Harvard College. He received his M.A in 1984 in statistics and his Ph.D. in statistics in 1988 from Harvard University and his M.D. (magna cum laude) in 1987 from Harvard Medical School.


Ana Mari Cauce
President
University of Washington

Ana Mari Cauce, Ph.D., President of the University of Washington. She is leading the university in advancing its mission in four key areas: providing a leading-edge student experience, conducting research and scholarship that has a global impact, upholding the UW’s dedication to its public mission and infusing the entire university with a commitment to innovation. Throughout her career, she has championed access to higher education, including through the Husky Promise, which provides full tuition to eligible Washington students who otherwise could not attend college. Raised in Miami after emigrating with her family from Cuba, Dr. Cauce earned a B.A. in english and psychology from the University of Miami, and a Ph.D. in psychology, with a concentration in child clinical and community psychology, from Yale University.


Valerie Conn
Executive Director
Science Philanthropy Alliance

Valerie Conn, Executive Director of the Science Philanthropy Alliance and has over 25 years of experience working with philanthropists, foundations, and corporations to fund science, medicine, engineering, and education initiatives. In 2015, Ms. Conn joined Science Philanthropy Alliance as its second employee in the role of vice president, helping to create the strategy to advise philanthropists on how to effectively support basic science research. She is a recognized expert on science philanthropy and a frequent speaker to a variety of stakeholders, including billionaire philanthropists, university science leaders, and fundraising professionals. Ms. Conn holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Northwestern University.


Machi Dilworth
Vice President for Gender Equality
and Human Resource Development
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University


Machi Dilworth, Ph.D., is Vice President for Gender Equality and Human Resource Development at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, in Okinawa, Japan. In this role, she aims to increase the representation and advancement of women at all levels in the university and to create a work environment free of gender-based biases. Prior to joining the OIST, she worked at the National Science Foundation for 24 years serving in a number of roles including Director of the Office of International Science and Engineering. She also served as a research administrator of the competitive grant program at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the 1980’s., Dr. Dilworth earned her Ph.D. in Plant Biochemistry and Physiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her B.A. in natural sciences from the International Christian University in Tokyo, Japan.

Paula T. Hammond [NAM/NAE]
David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering
Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Professor Paula T. Hammond is the David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering. She is a member of MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, the MIT Energy Initiative, and a founding member of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology. She recently served as the Executive Officer (Associate Chair) of the Chemical Engineering Department (2008-2011). The core of her work is the use of electrostatics and other complementary interactions to generate functional materials with highly controlled architecture. Her research in nanotechnology encompasses the development of new biomaterials to enable drug delivery from surfaces with spatio-temporal control. She also investigates novel responsive polymer architectures for targeted nanoparticle drug and gene delivery, and self-assembled materials systems for electrochemical energy devices. Professor Hammond was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2016, and into the 2013 Class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also the recipient of the 2013 AIChE Charles M. A. Stine Award, which is bestowed annually to a leading researcher in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of materials science and engineering, and the 2014 Alpha Chi Sigma Award for Chemical Engineering Research. She was selected to receive the Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Teal Innovator Award in 2013, which supports a single visionary individual from any field principally outside of ovarian cancer to focus his/her creativity, innovation, and leadership on ovarian cancer research. During her sabbatical in 2013, she was a visiting scientist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and a visiting professor at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, in the Chemical Engineering Department. Prof. Hammond continues to serve as an Associate Editor of the American Chemical Society journal, ACS Nano. As a part of the Year of Chemistry in 2011, she was one of the Top 100 materials scientists named by Thomson-Reuters, a recognition of the highest citation impact in the field over the past decade (2001-2011). She has published over 200 papers, and holds over 20 patents based on her research at MIT. She was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society Polymer Division. Professor Hammond’s work on multilayer tattoos for transdermal DNA vaccines was recently featured on the PBS Nova program, “Making Stuff” with David Pogue, and she was also featured in the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s Catalyst Series: Women in Chemistry.


Evelynn M. Hammonds [NAM]
Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and Professor of African and African American Studies
Harvard University

Dr. Evelynn M. Hammonds is the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. Professor Hammonds holds a BS in physics from Spelman College, a BEE in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech, SM in Physics from MIT and a PhD in the history of science from Harvard University. She was the first Senior Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity at Harvard University (2005-2008). From 2008-2013 she served as Dean of Harvard College. She holds honorary degrees from Spelman College and Bates College. Professor Hammonds is a fellow of the Association of Women in Science (AWIS). Professor Hammonds’ areas of research include the histories of science, medicine and public health in the United States; race and gender in science studies; feminist theory and African American history. She is the author of Childhood’s Deadly Scourge: The Campaign to Control Diphtheria in New York City, 1880-1930 (1999). She co-edited with Barbara Laslett, Sally G. Kohlstedt, and Helen Longino, eds. Gender and Scientific Authority, (1999) She was co-editor with Jennifer M. Shephard and Stephen M. Kosslyn of The Harvard Sampler: Liberal Education for the Twenty-First Century (2011) and with Rebecca Herzig, The Nature of Difference: Sciences of Race in the United States from Jefferson to Genomics (2008.) She has published articles on the history of disease, race and science, African American feminism, African-American women and the epidemic of HIV/AIDS and analyses of gender and race and in science and medicine. Professor Hammonds’ work focuses on the intersection of genetic, medical and socio-political concepts of race in the United States. She is currently the director of the Project on the Study of Race & Gender in Science & Medicine at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Prof. Hammonds is an Area Advisor for African American History, History of Science and Technology for the Online Bibliography of Oxford University Press. She served two terms as a Member of the Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering (CEOSE) the Congressionally Mandated Advisory Committee to the National Science Foundation. She served as a member of President Obama’s Advisory Committee on Educational Excellence for African Americans and as a member of President Obama’s National Advisory Committee on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She was formerly a member of the Board of Trustees of Spelman and Bennett Colleges and currently she is a member of the Board of the Arcus Foundation. Dr. Hammonds is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.


Hilary Lapin-Scott
Senior Pro-Vice Chancellor
Swansea University
United Kingdom

Hilary Lapin-Scott, Ph.D., is Senior Pro-Vice Chancellor at Swansea Universityin the U.K. and leads on research and innovation, strategic development andv is part of the senior team that runs the University. She is a member of the American Society for Microbiology. Professor Hilary Lappin-Scott is passionate about increasing diversity and inclusivity and supporting women in STEM careers, and was awarded the 2016 WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) HERO award in 2016. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Warwick, U.K.


Ed Lazowska [NAE]

Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science and Engineering
University of Washington

Ed Lazowska holds the Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. Dr. Lazowska received his A.B. from Brown University in 1972 and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977, when he joined the University of Washington faculty. His research and teaching concern the design, implementation, and analysis of high performance computing and communication systems, and, more recently, the techniques and technologies of data-intensive discovery. He also has been active in public policy issues, ranging from STEM education to Federal strategies for research and innovation. Dr. Lazowska is a Member and Councillor of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. A long-time advocate for increasing participation in the field, he serves on the Executive Advisory Council of the National Center for Women & Information Technology, and on the National Academies Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine. From 2008-17 he served as the Founding Director of the University of Washington e-Science Institute, where he continues as a Senior Data Science Fellow.

Valerie Taylor
Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
Dwight Look College of Engineering, and
Regents Professor and Royce E. Wisenbaker Professor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Texas A&M University

Valerie Taylor is the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the Dwight Look College of Engineering and the Regents Professor and Royce E. Wisenbaker Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. In 2003, she joined Texas A&M University as the Department Head of CSE, where she remained in that position until 2011. Prior to joining Texas A&M, Taylor was a member of the faculty in the EECS Department at Northwestern University for eleven years. She has authored or co-authored over 100 papers in the area high performance computing. She is also the Executive Director of the Center for Minorities and People with Disabilities in IT (CMD-IT). Taylor is an IEEE Fellow and has received numerous awards for distinguished research and leadership, including the 2001 IEEE Harriet B. Rigas Award for a woman with significant contributions in engineering education, the 2002 Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni from the University of California at Berkeley, the 2002 CRA Nico Habermann Award for increasing the diversity in computing, and the 2005 Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing. Taylor is a member of ACM. Valerie E. Taylor earned her B.S. in ECE and M.S. in Computer Engineering from Purdue University in 1985 and 1986, respectively, and a Ph.D. in EECS from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1991.


Susan R. Wessler [NAS]

Neil and Rochelle Campbell Chair for Innovation in Science Education
University of California, Riverside
Home Secretary, National Academy of Sciences

Susan Wessler is Distinguished Professor of Genetics and the Neil and Rochelle Campbell Chair for Innovation in Science Education at the University of California Riverside. In 2011 she was elected Home Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences, the first women to hold this position in its 150-year history. She is a molecular geneticist known for her contributions to the field of transposon biology, specifically on the roles of plant transposable elements in gene and genome evolution. A native of New York City, she received a bachelor’s degree in biology from SUNY Stony Brook (1974), a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Cornell University (1980) and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington (1980-1982). She began her career at the University of Georgia in 1983 where she remained until moving to UC Riverside in 2010. Wessler has contributed extensively to educational initiatives, including co-authorship of the genetics textbook, Introduction to Genetic Analysis. As a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor (2006), she adapted her research program for the classroom by developing the Dynamic Genome Courses where over 500 incoming freshman per year can experience the excitement of scientific discovery. Dr. Wessler is the recipient of several awards including the Stephen Hales Prize (2011) from the American Society of Plant Biologists, the Excellence in Science Award from FASEB (2012) and the McClintock Prize for Plant Genetics and Genome Studies (2015). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1998), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2007), the American Philosophical Society (2013), and a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (2017).


Sheldon Weinbaum [NAS/NAE/NAM]

CUNY Distinguished Professor Emeritus
The City College of the City University of New York

Sheldon Weinbaum is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the City College of New York. Weinbaum is one of nineteen living individuals elected to all three U.S. National Academies (the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Medicine. He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the only engineer to have received a Guggenheim Fellowship in the category cell and molecular biology. He received his Ph.D. in engineering in 1963 from Harvard University and is widely recognized for novel biomechanical models that have changed existing views in such areas as vulnerable plaque rupture, bone fluid flow, cellular mechanotransduction, renal transport, and microvascular heat exchange. Though Weinbaum is retired from classroom teaching, he continues to work full-time at the Grove School of Engineering, doing research and advising graduate students. He is also well known for his long-standing efforts to integrate women and under-represented minorities into engineering. He has been a lifelong advocate for women and minorities in science and engineering. He was the lead plaintiff and organizer of a class-action lawsuit (Weinbaum vs. Cuomo 1992-1996) charging New York State officials with racially discriminatory funding of its two university systems, CUNY and SUNY, the first CUNY faculty recipient of the Public Service Award of the Fund for the City of New York 1988, and the Inaugural recipient of the “Diversity Award” of the Biomedical Engineering Society (2009). In the last ranking of PhD programs in the U.S. by the NRC in 2011 the CUNY doctoral program in Biomedical Engineering, which he founded, was ranked first in diversity among all 74 programs in the nation. He is currently chair of the Selection Committee that chooses the annual Sloan Awardees for the outstanding math and science teachers in the New York City public high schools. 


Ex-Officio Members

Jane E. Henney [NAM]
Home Secretary
National Academy of Medicine

Jane E. Henney (NAM) has been the Home Secretary of the National Academy of Medicine since 2014. In this capacity, she will assist the President and the Council in strengthening and supporting membership activities and participation. Jane Henney has held senior leadership positions in both the academic and federal sectors. Among these, she was the Commissioner of Food and Drugs at the U.S. Food and Drug administration from 1998 until January 2001; Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute from 1980-1985; Senior Vice President and Provost for Health Affairs at the University of Cincinnati 2003-2008; Vice President for Health Sciences at the University of New Mexico 1994-1998; Vice Chancellor for Health Programs and Policy at the University of Kansas Medical Center 1988-1992 and Interim Dean of the College of Medicine 1987-1989. Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, she soon became a frequently sought after member of study and workshop planning committees, as well as serving on the Membership Committee as leader of her section and later as committee chair. She is a fellow of the American College of Health Care Executives and was elected to membership of both the Society of Medical Administrators and the Medical Administrators Conference. She has received numerous citations and awards for her work. Dr. Henney currently serves on the boards of directors of several not-for-profit organizations and publicly traded companies. She received her undergraduate training at Manchester University, an MD degree from Indiana University School of Medicine and did postgraduate work at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.



Dr. Julia M. Phillips [NAE]
Home Secretary
National Academy of Engineering


Dr. Julia M. Phillips retired in 2015 from Sandia National Laboratories after nearly 20 years. She culminated her Sandia career by serving as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, when she led the Laboratory’s internally funded research and development program, research strategy, and intellectual property protection and deployment. Other positions at Sandia included Director of Nuclear Weapons Science and Technology Programs; Director of the Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center; and Director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories. Prior to her time at Sandia, she spent 14 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories where she performed leading edge research in thin film epitaxial electronic materials and complex oxides.
Phillips is a member of the National Science Board, member and Home Secretary of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Materials Research Society (MRS), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Physical Society (APS). She is currently a member of the NASEM Division Committee on Engineering and Physical Sciences and has served on the NAE Council and AAAS Board of Directors, and has chaired the APS Panel on Public Affairs, the APS Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications, and the APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics. She also served as President of the MRS.  In 2008 Phillips received the George E. Pake Prize from the American Physical Society “for her leadership and pioneering research in materials physics for industrial and national security applications.” She has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Materials Research, Journal of Applied Physics, and Applied Physics Reviews. She has edited books, written book chapters, and authored more than 100 journal publications, 12 major review articles, and 45 refereed conference proceedings publications. She also holds five patents.