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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
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UPCOMING EVENTS

Upcoming Events

Workshop on Women of Color in STEM
November 10, 2017
Washington, DC

Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine Meeting
November 9-10, 2017
Washington, DC

Celebrating Women in Science and Recognizing L’ORÉAL USA Women in Science Fellows
November 9, 2017
Washington, DC

More past events...

Contact Us

Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
Keck Center
500 5th Street NW
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: 202.334.2389
Fax: 202.334.2290
Email:
cwsem@nas.edu 

 


CWSEM Member Biographies

Rita R. Colwell [NAS]*, Chair
Distinguished University Professor
University of Maryland, College Park, and
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Rita Colwell is Distinguished University Professor both at the University of Maryland at College Park and at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Senior Advisor and Chairman Emeritus, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc., and President and CEO of CosmosID, Inc. Her interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health, and she is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world. Colwell served as the 11th Director of the National Science Foundation, 1998-2004. In her capacity as NSF Director, she served as Co-chair of the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council. Colwell has held many advisory positions in the U.S. Government, nonprofit science policy organizations, and private foundations, as well as in the international scientific research community. She is a nationally-respected scientist and educator, and has authored or co-authored 17 books and more than 750 scientific publications. She produced the award-winning film, Invisible Seas, and has served on editorial boards of numerous scientific journals. Before going to NSF, Colwell was President of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and Professor of Microbiology and Biotechnology at the University Maryland. She was also a member of the National Science Board from 1984 to 1990. Colwell has previously served as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Microbiology and also as President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Washington Academy of Sciences, the American Society for Microbiology, the Sigma Xi National Science Honorary Society, and the International Union of Microbiological Societies. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, the Royal Society of Canada, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She is Immediate Past-President of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). Colwell has also been awarded 55 honorary degrees from institutions of higher education and received numerous awards. Born in Beverly, Massachusetts, Dr. Colwell holds a B.S. in Bacteriology and an M.S. in Genetics, from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Washington.


Alice M. Agogino [NAE]
Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, and
Councilor, Council of the National Academy of Engineering

Alice M. Agogino is the Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and affiliated faculty at the Haas School of Business in their Operations and Information Technology Management Group. She directs the BEST Lab: Berkeley Energy and Sustainable Technologies | Berkeley Expert Systems Technology | Berkeley Emergent Space Tensegrities. She currently serves as Chair of the Development Engineering Graduate Group and Education Director of the Blum Center for Emerging Economies. (Download C.V. July 2016) Alice Agogino served as Chair of the Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate in 2005-06, having served as Vice Chair during the 2004-05 academic year. She has served in a number of other administrative positions at UC Berkeley including Associate Dean of Engineering and Faculty Assistant to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost in Educational Development and Technology. She also served as Director for Synthesis, an NSF-sponsored coalition of eight universities with the goal of reforming undergraduate engineering education, and continues as Founding Director for the Engineering Pathway digital library of engineering courseware. She is currently serving as Chair of the Development Engineering Graduate Group and Education Director of the Blum Center for Developing Economies. She has supervised 187 MS projects/theses, 50 doctoral dissertations and numerous undergraduate researchers. Prior to joining the faculty at UC Berkeley, Dr. Agogino worked in industry for Dow Chemical, General Electric and SRI International. Her research interests include: soft robotics; community-based design; development engineering; sustainable engineering; internet of things; intelligent learning systems; information retrieval and data mining; multiobjective and strategic product design; nonlinear optimization; probabilistic modeling; intelligent control and manufacturing; sensor validation, fusion and diagnostics; wireless sensor networks; multimedia and computer-aided design; design databases; design theory and methods; MEMS synthesis and computer-aided design; artificial intelligence and decision and expert systems; and gender/ethnic equity. Dr. Agogino has authored over two hundred peer-reviewed publications in these subject areas. She is a member of AAAI, AAAS, ASEE, ASME, AWIS, IEEE, NAE and SWE and served as Chair of the AAAS section on Engineering (2001-2002). She serves on the editorial board of three professional journals and has provided service on a number of governmental, professional, and industry advisory committees, including the NSF Advisory Committee for Engineering, Engineering Directorate, (1991-96, Chair 1996-97); Guidance Committee of the “Removing Barriers to Collaborative Research” project of the National Research Council (NRC) Government-University-Industry Roundtable (1997-98); NRC Committee on “Standards for Technology Education,” (1997-98); National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Academic Advisory Board (1998-2002); NAE “Engineering of the Year 2020” Planning/Steering Committee (Co-Chair of Planning, 1999-2000; Member of Steering; 2002-2005) and Executive Committeee, Digital Media Innovation Initiative, University of California System (2000-2001), Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST; 2004-2005), JPL/Cal Tech Engineering Advisory Board (2003-2005), National Academies Board on Science Education (BOSE, 2005-2007) and the Women in Academic Science Engineering Committee of the National Academies Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP; 2005-2010). She is or has served on a number of university advisory boards: CMU CIT, KAUST, Harvard/Radcliffe, MIT and SUTD. Dr. Agogino received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of New Mexico (1975), M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering (1978) from the University of California at Berkeley and Ph.D. from the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems at Stanford University (1984).


Dr. Cristina Amon [NAE]
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and
Alumni Chair Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
University of Toronto

Dr. Cristina Amon has been Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Alumni Chair Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto (U of T) since 2006. Since her appointment, she has created programs to foster collaborative scholarship, enhance student experience, encourage active learning, promote multidisciplinary research excellence and accelerate innovation. Prior to joining U of T, Dr. Amon was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and Director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems (ICES) at Carnegie Mellon University.. She is a pioneer in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics for formulating and solving thermal design problems subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints. Dean Amon continues her research at the University of Toronto in nanoscale thermal transport in semiconductors, energy systems and biomedical devices. Amon received her Mechanical Engineering diploma from Simón Bolívar University and continued her education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she earned her MS and ScD degrees in 1985 and 1988, respectively.


Nancy Andrews [NAS/NAM]
Dean of the Duke University School of Medicine and
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs,
Nanaline H. Duke Professor of Pediatrics and
Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology


Nancy Andrews, MD, PhD, has been Dean of the Duke University School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs since October 2007. She is also Nanaline H. Duke Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology.
Prior to coming to Duke, Andrews was the George Richards Minot Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Senior Associate in Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston, and a Distinguished Physician of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Andrews also served as director of the Harvard-MIT MD-PhD Program and dean for Basic Sciences and Graduate Studies at Harvard Medical School. She was an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute for 13 years. Her research has focused on mammalian iron homeostasis and mouse models of human diseases. She has received numerous awards and prizes for research and mentoring. She served as the 2009 President of the American Society of Clinical Investigation. Andrews was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She currently serves on the Council of the National Academy of Medicine and the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In addition, she is the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and a member of the Board of Directors of Novartis International AG. Andrews received her BS and MS degrees in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University. She earned her PhD in Biology from MIT and her MD from Harvard Medical School through the Harvard Medical Scientist Training Program. She completed residency and fellowship training in Pediatrics and Hematology/Oncology at Children’s Hospital Boston and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and served as an attending physician at Children’s Hospital.


Joan W. Bennett [NAS]
Distinguished Professor of Plant Biology and Pathology,
Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, and
Associate Vice President, Office for Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics, Rutgers University

Joan W. Bennett is is a professor in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology and the associate vice president for The Office for Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics at Rutgers University. She is a past president of the American Society for Microbiology and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Bennett has done work in fungal genetics as well as in women’s studies. She taught a popular course Biology of Women beginning in 1976 while she was at Tulane University (1971-2006). She is currently a leader of her institution’s NSF ADVANCE project on women faculty. Bennett earned a bachelor’s degree in biology and history from Upsala College, and a master’s and doctorate degree in botany from the University of Chicago.


Emery Neal Brown [NAS/NAE/NAM]
Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia
Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts General Hospita

Emery Neal Brown is the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and a practicing anesthesiologist at MGH. At MIT he is the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and professor of computational neuroscience the Associate Director of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, and the Director of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Program. Brown is one of only 19 individuals who have been elected to all three branches of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Brown is also the first African American and first anesthesiologist to be elected to all three National Academies. Brown was the recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Minority Medical Faculty Development Fellowship, an NSF Minority Career Development Fellowship, National Institute of Mental Health Independent Scientist Award, America’s Leading Doctor Award from Black Enterprise Magazine, the Jerome Sacks Award from the National Institute of Statistical Sciences for Outstanding Cross Disciplinary Research, an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, an NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award, Guggenheim Fellowship, And the American Society of Anesthesiologists Award for Excellence in Research. Brown he received his B.A. (magna cum laude) in applied mathematics from Harvard College. He received his M.A in 1984 in statistics and his Ph.D. in statistics in 1988 from Harvard University and his M.D. (magna cum laude) in 1987 from Harvard Medical School.


Jennifer T. Chayes

Distinguished Scientist, and Managing Director
Microsoft Research New England and Microsoft Research New York City


Jennifer Tour Chayes is a leading interdisciplinary scientist, and among the world leaders in the relatively new field of network science. Chayes started as a mathematical statistical physicist, doing seminal work in phase transitions of ordered and disordered systems, including proving the Harris criterion for disordered systems and rigorously establishing the behavior of the long-range one-dimensional Ising magnet, a long outstanding problem first posed by Dyson. Motivated by understanding phase transitions in disordered systems, Chayes then spearheaded the study of phase transitions in some of the classic problems of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science, which has since led to the development of very fast algorithms for computationally difficult problems. Next, extending techniques from the study of random statistical physics systems, Chayes made major contributions to the study of models, processes, and algorithms on large-scale networks like the WWW. Perhaps her greatest achievement is the introduction of the notion of convergence for large networks (analogous to thermodynamic limits in statistical physics), and a characterization of their limits. This new field of graph limits is now a thriving subfield in combinatorics and graph theory, where it has led to connections with many other fields, including machine learning of and algorithms for massive networks. Chayes has also recently done work on physics-inspired algorithms for deep learning. Finally, Chayes is a world leader in the application of network science and network algorithms to many practical domains, including economics, social networks, and regulatory networks in systems biology.

Chayes is the founder and managing director of two interdisciplinary research labs, Microsoft Research New England and Microsoft Research New York City. Before joining Microsoft, she was for many years Professor of Mathematics at UCLA. She has served on numerous boards and committees, including as Vice President of the American Mathematical Society, Chair of the Mathematics Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Chair of the Turing Award Selection Committee. She was twice a member of the Institute for Advanced Study. Chayes has received many honors: she is a Fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery, the American Mathematical Society, the Fields Institute, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the American Association of Arts and Sciences. Among many other awards, she received the 2012 Women of Vision Leadership Award from the Anita Borg Institute, and the 2015 John von Neumann Lecture Prize from the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, the highest honor in applied mathematics. Chayes received an honorary degree from Leiden University in 2016.


Paula T. Hammond
David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering
Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Professor Paula T. Hammond is the David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering. She is a member of MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, the MIT Energy Initiative, and a founding member of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology. She recently served as the Executive Officer (Associate Chair) of the Chemical Engineering Department (2008-2011). The core of her work is the use of electrostatics and other complementary interactions to generate functional materials with highly controlled architecture. Her research in nanotechnology encompasses the development of new biomaterials to enable drug delivery from surfaces with spatio-temporal control. She also investigates novel responsive polymer architectures for targeted nanoparticle drug and gene delivery, and self-assembled materials systems for electrochemical energy devices. Professor Hammond was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2016, and into the 2013 Class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also the recipient of the 2013 AIChE Charles M. A. Stine Award, which is bestowed annually to a leading researcher in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of materials science and engineering, and the 2014 Alpha Chi Sigma Award for Chemical Engineering Research. She was selected to receive the Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Teal Innovator Award in 2013, which supports a single visionary individual from any field principally outside of ovarian cancer to focus his/her creativity, innovation, and leadership on ovarian cancer research. During her sabbatical in 2013, she was a visiting scientist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and a visiting professor at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, in the Chemical Engineering Department. Prof. Hammond continues to serve as an Associate Editor of the American Chemical Society journal, ACS Nano. As a part of the Year of Chemistry in 2011, she was one of the Top 100 materials scientists named by Thomson-Reuters, a recognition of the highest citation impact in the field over the past decade (2001-2011). She has published over 200 papers, and holds over 20 patents based on her research at MIT. She was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society Polymer Division. Professor Hammond’s work on multilayer tattoos for transdermal DNA vaccines was recently featured on the PBS Nova program, “Making Stuff” with David Pogue, and she was also featured in the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s Catalyst Series: Women in Chemistry.


Evelynn M. Hammonds
Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and Professor of African and African American Studies
Harvard University

Dr. Evelynn M. Hammonds is the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. Professor Hammonds holds a BS in physics from Spelman College, a BEE in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech, SM in Physics from MIT and a PhD in the history of science from Harvard University. She was the first Senior Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity at Harvard University (2005-2008). From 2008-2013 she served as Dean of Harvard College. She holds honorary degrees from Spelman College and Bates College. Professor Hammonds is a fellow of the Association of Women in Science (AWIS). Professor Hammonds’ areas of research include the histories of science, medicine and public health in the United States; race and gender in science studies; feminist theory and African American history. She is the author of Childhood’s Deadly Scourge: The Campaign to Control Diphtheria in New York City, 1880-1930 (1999). She co-edited with Barbara Laslett, Sally G. Kohlstedt, and Helen Longino, eds. Gender and Scientific Authority, (1999) She was co-editor with Jennifer M. Shephard and Stephen M. Kosslyn of The Harvard Sampler: Liberal Education for the Twenty-First Century (2011) and with Rebecca Herzig, The Nature of Difference: Sciences of Race in the United States from Jefferson to Genomics (2008.) She has published articles on the history of disease, race and science, African American feminism, African-American women and the epidemic of HIV/AIDS and analyses of gender and race and in science and medicine. Professor Hammonds’ work focuses on the intersection of genetic, medical and socio-political concepts of race in the United States. She is currently the director of the Project on the Study of Race & Gender in Science & Medicine at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Prof. Hammonds is an Area Advisor for African American History, History of Science and Technology for the Online Bibliography of Oxford University Press. She served two terms as a Member of the Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering (CEOSE) the Congressionally Mandated Advisory Committee to the National Science Foundation. She served as a member of President Obama’s Advisory Committee on Educational Excellence for African Americans and as a member of President Obama’s National Advisory Committee on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She was formerly a member of the Board of Trustees of Spelman and Bennett Colleges and currently she is a member of the Board of the Arcus Foundation.


Ed Lazowska [NAE]

Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science and Engineering
University of Washington

Edward Lazowska holds the Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he also serves as the Director of the University of Washington eScience Institute. Lazowska is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition, he has received the Vollum Award for Distinguished Accomplishment in Science and Technology from Reed College, and the University of Washington Computer Science & Engineering Undergraduate Teaching Award. Lazowska’s national leadership activities include serving as Co-Chair of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee from 2003-05, and as Co-Chair of the Working Group of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology in 2010. He also has served as Chair of the Computing Research Association, Chair of the NSF CISE Advisory Committee, Chair of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group, and Founding Chair of the Computing Community Consortium, as well as serving on a large number of National Academies study committees. In recognition of his national leadership he has received the Computing Research Association Distinguished Service Award, the ACM Presidential Award, and the ACM Distinguished Service Award. A long-time advocate for increasing women’s participation in the field, Lazowska serves on the Executive Advisory Council of the National Center for Women & Information Technology. Lazowska received his A.B. from Brown University in 1972 and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977, when he joined the University of Washington faculty.

 
Vivian W. Pinn [NAM]
Senior Scientist Emerita, Fogarty International Center, and
Former Director, Office of Research on Women’s Health (Retired)
National Institutes of Health

Vivian W. Pinn is the former Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She was the first full-time Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health in the Office of the Director of NIH, appointed in 1991. She came to NIH from Howard University’s College of Medicine in Washington, DC, where she had been Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology, and she has previously held appointments at Tufts University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School. She has been invited to present the ORWH’s mandate, programs, and initiatives to many national and international organizations with an interest in improving women’s health, the health of minorities, and careers in bioscience for women and minorities. She served as Co-Chair of the Committee on Women in Biomedical Careers until her retirement. She has received numerous honors, awards, and recognitions and has been granted eleven honorary degrees of laws and science since 1992. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). She received her B.A. from Wellesley College and her M.D. from the University of Virginia, School Of Medicine in 1967.

 
Valerie Taylor
Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
Dwight Look College of Engineering, and
Regents Professor and Royce E. Wisenbaker Professor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Texas A&M University

Valerie Taylor is the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the Dwight Look College of Engineering and the Regents Professor and Royce E. Wisenbaker Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. In 2003, she joined Texas A&M University as the Department Head of CSE, where she remained in that position until 2011. Prior to joining Texas A&M, Taylor was a member of the faculty in the EECS Department at Northwestern University for eleven years. She has authored or co-authored over 100 papers in the area high performance computing. She is also the Executive Director of the Center for Minorities and People with Disabilities in IT (CMD-IT). Taylor is an IEEE Fellow and has received numerous awards for distinguished research and leadership, including the 2001 IEEE Harriet B. Rigas Award for a woman with significant contributions in engineering education, the 2002 Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni from the University of California at Berkeley, the 2002 CRA Nico Habermann Award for increasing the diversity in computing, and the 2005 Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing. Taylor is a member of ACM. Valerie E. Taylor earned her B.S. in ECE and M.S. in Computer Engineering from Purdue University in 1985 and 1986, respectively, and a Ph.D. in EECS from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1991.


Susan R. Wessler [NAS]

Neil A and Rochelle A Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education
Home Secretary, National Academy of Sciences
UC Riverside

Susan R. Wessler isNeil A and Rochelle A Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education at UC Riverside
She is also the Home Secretary, National Academy of Sciences. Born in New York City, Wessler earned her B.A. at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1974, and her Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1980. Wessler completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Carnegie Institute of Washington, working on transposable elements in maize. From 1983-2010 Wessler was in the department of plant biology at the University of Georgia, Athens, where she was Assistant, Associate, Full Professor and finally Regents Professor. Wessler was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 1998 and was elected in 2004 to the Council of the National Academy. She was elected as NAS Home Secretary in 2011. She is a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the recipient of Distinguished Scientist Award (2007) from the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA), the Stephen Hales Prize (2010) from the American Association of Plant Biology and the FASEB Excellence in Science Award (2012). Her scientific interest focuses on the subject of plant transposable elements and the evolution of plant genomes.


Sheldon Weinbaum [NAS/NAE/NAM]

CUNY Distinguished Professor Emeritus
The City College of the City University of New York

Sheldon Weinbaum is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the City College of New York. Weinbaum is one of nineteen living individuals elected to all three U.S. National Academies (the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Medicine. He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the only engineer to have received a Guggenheim Fellowship in the category cell and molecular biology. He received his Ph.D. in engineering in 1963 from Harvard University and is widely recognized for novel biomechanical models that have changed existing views in such areas as vulnerable plaque rupture, bone fluid flow, cellular mechanotransduction, renal transport, and microvascular heat exchange. Though Weinbaum is retired from classroom teaching, he continues to work full-time at the Grove School of Engineering, doing research and advising graduate students. He is also well known for his long-standing efforts to integrate women and under-represented minorities into engineering. He has been a lifelong advocate for women and minorities in science and engineering. He was the lead plaintiff and organizer of a class-action lawsuit (Weinbaum vs. Cuomo 1992-1996) charging New York State officials with racially discriminatory funding of its two university systems, CUNY and SUNY, the first CUNY faculty recipient of the Public Service Award of the Fund for the City of New York 1988, and the Inaugural recipient of the “Diversity Award” of the Biomedical Engineering Society (2009). In the last ranking of PhD programs in the U.S. by the NRC in 2011 the CUNY doctoral program in Biomedical Engineering, which he founded, was ranked first in diversity among all 74 programs in the nation. He is currently chair of the Selection Committee that chooses the annual Sloan Awardees for the outstanding math and science teachers in the New York City public high schools. 


Ex-Officio Members

Jane E. Henney [NAM]
Home Secretary
National Academy of Medicine

Jane E. Henney (NAM) has been the Home Secretary of the National Academy of Medicine since 2014. In this capacity, she will assist the President and the Council in strengthening and supporting membership activities and participation. Jane Henney has held senior leadership positions in both the academic and federal sectors. Among these, she was the Commissioner of Food and Drugs at the U.S. Food and Drug administration from 1998 until January 2001; Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute from 1980-1985; Senior Vice President and Provost for Health Affairs at the University of Cincinnati 2003-2008; Vice President for Health Sciences at the University of New Mexico 1994-1998; Vice Chancellor for Health Programs and Policy at the University of Kansas Medical Center 1988-1992 and Interim Dean of the College of Medicine 1987-1989. Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, she soon became a frequently sought after member of study and workshop planning committees, as well as serving on the Membership Committee as leader of her section and later as committee chair. She is a fellow of the American College of Health Care Executives and was elected to membership of both the Society of Medical Administrators and the Medical Administrators Conference. She has received numerous citations and awards for her work. Dr. Henney currently serves on the boards of directors of several not-for-profit organizations and publicly traded companies. She received her undergraduate training at Manchester University, an MD degree from Indiana University School of Medicine and did postgraduate work at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.



Dr. Julia M. Phillips [NAE]
Home Secretary
National Academy of Engineering


Dr. Julia M. Phillips retired in 2015 from Sandia National Laboratories after nearly 20 years. She culminated her Sandia career by serving as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, when she led the Laboratory’s internally funded research and development program, research strategy, and intellectual property protection and deployment. Other positions at Sandia included Director of Nuclear Weapons Science and Technology Programs; Director of the Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center; and Director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories. Prior to her time at Sandia, she spent 14 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories where she performed leading edge research in thin film epitaxial electronic materials and complex oxides.
Phillips is a member of the National Science Board, member and Home Secretary of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Materials Research Society (MRS), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Physical Society (APS). She is currently a member of the NASEM Division Committee on Engineering and Physical Sciences and has served on the NAE Council and AAAS Board of Directors, and has chaired the APS Panel on Public Affairs, the APS Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications, and the APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics. She also served as President of the MRS.  In 2008 Phillips received the George E. Pake Prize from the American Physical Society “for her leadership and pioneering research in materials physics for industrial and national security applications.” She has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Materials Research, Journal of Applied Physics, and Applied Physics Reviews. She has edited books, written book chapters, and authored more than 100 journal publications, 12 major review articles, and 45 refereed conference proceedings publications. She also holds five patents.