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Committee on Science, Technology, and Law
34th Meeting
October 10-11, 2017
Washington, DC 

Committee on the Future of Voting: Accessible, Reliable, Verifiable Technology
3rd Meeting
October 18-19, 2017
Washington, DC

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Committee on Science, Technology, and Law
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Keck Center, Room 570
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: 202 334-1713
Fax: 202 334-2530

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CSTL Co-Chairs Emeriti

Donald Kennedy (NAS/NAM), A.B. (Biology), Harvard University; Ph.D. (Biology), Harvard University, was founding Co-Chair of the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law (CSTL). He is Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Science, the prestigious weekly international journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is President Emeritus and Bing Professor of Environmental Science, Stanford University. He came to Stanford in 1960, served as chairman of the Department of Biology and then became chairman of the Program in Human Biology, an interdisciplinary undergraduate program he helped create. His early research interests at Stanford were originally in animal behavior and neurobiology in particular. Although these interests remain, they were overtaken by a deeper concern with ecology and environmental policy—exploring how the natural and social sciences can contribute to improving environmental practices and institutions. His specific areas of expertise range from global climate change to the ecosystem impacts of alien marine species invasions. More recently at Stanford he co-directed the Center for Environmental Science and Policy in the Institute for International Studies, an interdisciplinary center devoted to the development of policies regarding such environmental problems as major land-use changes, economically driven alterations in agricultural practice, global climate change, and the development of regulatory practices. He took leave from Stanford in 1977 to serve as FDA Commissioner, then returned in 1979. He served for a year as Stanford’s Provost before assuming the university’s presidency for a tenure of 12 years. He is the author of Academic Duty, that discusses some of the challenges facing American institutions of higher education. Dr. Kennedy is a member of the National Academy of Science, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He was a member of the National Commission for Public Service, and the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government, and on the Board of the Health Effects Institute. Dr. Kennedy’s past service on National Academies committees includes (1) Board of Overseers; (2) Board of Advisors, (3) Governing Board of the National Research Council, (4) Policy Division Advisory Committee (ex-officio member), (5) Steering Committee on Science and Creationism, (6) Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education Advisory Board (chair); (7) Committee on International Organizations and Programs; (8) Panel for the “National Science Education Standards” and Television Project; (9) Working Group on Teaching Evolution (chair); (10) Project on Report to the National Education Goals Panel; (11) Undergraduate Convocation Program Steering Committee; (12) Issues in Science and Technology Advisory Board. Dr. Kennedy was a member of the National Academies planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law and served on CSTL's Subcommittee on Ensuring the Quality of Information Disseminated by the Federal Government.

David Korn (NAM), M.D., Harvard University, is Professor of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. From November 15, 2008 to June 30, 2011, he was the inaugural Vice-Provost for Research at Harvard University. Prior to joining Harvard, Dr. Korn had served as the Chief Scientific Officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in Washington, D.C. since January 15, 2007, and before that as the Senior Vice President for Biomedical and Health Sciences Research at the Association since September 1, 1997.

Dr. Korn served as Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professor and Dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine from October 1984 to April 1995, and as Vice President of Stanford University from January 1986 to April 1995. Previously, he had served as Professor and Founding Chairman of the Department of Pathology at Stanford, and Chief of the Pathology Service at the Stanford University Hospital, since June 1967. Dr. Korn has been Chairman of the Stanford University Committee on Research; President of the American Association of Pathologists (now the American Society for Investigative Pathology), from which he received the Gold-Headed Cane Award for lifetime achievement in 2004; President of the Association of Pathology Chairman, from which he received the Distinguished Service Award in 1999; a member of the Board of Directors and of the Executive Committee of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology; and a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Academic Health Centers.

Dr. Korn served on the Board of Directors of the Stanford University Hospital from October 1982 to April 1995, the Children’s Hospital at Stanford from October 1984 to its closure, and the Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford from October 1984 to April 1995. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the California Society of Pathologists from 1983-86. Dr. Korn has been a member of the editorial boards of the American Journal of Pathology, The Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Human Pathology, and for many years was an Associate Editor of the latter. He has sat on many Society Councils and Boards. His nearly 200 publications range from bacteriophage biochemistry and genetics to the biochemistry and molecular biology of DNA replication in human cells, and more recently, concern issues of academic values and integrity, research integrity, health and science policy, and financial conflicts of interest in academic medicine.

Richard Merrill (NAM), A.B., Columbia University; B.A., Oxford University; M.A., Oxford University; LL.B., Columbia University School of Law, was founding Co-Chair of the Committee on Science, Technology and Law (CSTL). He is Daniel Caplin Professor of Law, University of Virginia Law School. He is Of Senior Counsel, Covington & Burling. An expert in administrative, environmental, and food and drug law, Professor Merrill joined the law faculty in 1969 after four years of practice with the law firm of Covington & Burling. In 1975 he took a leave from the Law School to serve for two years as chief counsel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, where he received the FDA Commissioner’s Special Citation and the agency’s Award of Merit. He was Dean of the Law School from 1980 to 1988. During the fall of 1988 he was scholar-in-residence at the National Wildlife Federation and in the spring of 1989 he was a visiting fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies at Oxford University. He was a member of the faculty of the American law session of the Salzburg Seminar in 1981 and 1986. A former Rhodes Scholar, Merrill was editor-in-chief of the Columbia Law Review. After graduation, he served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He has been a consultant to the U.S. Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He is a member of the American Law Institute and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation and the Virginia Law Foundation. Professor Merrill is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Professor Merrill has served on numerous National Academies boards and committees, including (1) Board on Health Sciences Policy; (2) Policy Division Advisory Committee; (3) Food Forum; (4) Committee to Ensure Safe Food from Production to Consumption; (5) Report Review of IOM Reports; (6) Committee to Study the Use of Advisory Committees by the Food and Drug Administration; (7) Committee on Nutrition Components of Food Labeling (chair); (8) Council of the National Academy of Medicine (executive committee); (9) Committee on Scientific and Regulatory Issues Underlying Pesticide use patterns and Agricultural Innovation; (10) Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health; (11) Committee on Urgent Research Opportunities on Health Effects of Hazardous Exposures; and (12) Committee on Institutional Means for Assessment of Risks to Public Health. Professor Merrill was a member of the National Academies planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law and a member of CSTL's Subcommittee on Ensuring the Quality of Information Disseminated by the Federal Government.

Richard A. Meserve (NAE), J.D., Harvard Law School; Ph.D. (Applied Physics) Stanford University; B.A., Tufts University, is President Emeritus of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Before assuming the Carnegie presidency in April 2003, he was Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), having served since October 1999. Before joining the NRC, Dr. Meserve was a partner in the law firm of Covington & Burling LLP, where he now serves on a part-time basis as a Senior Of Counsel. He devoted his legal practice to technical issues arising in environmental and toxic tort litigation, counseling scientific societies and high-tech companies, and nuclear licensing. Early in his career, he served as legal counsel to the President’s science advisor, and was a law clerk to Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court and to Judge Benjamin Kaplan of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Philosophical Society; a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and the American Physical Society; and a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He currently serves as Chairman of the International Nuclear Safety Group, chartered by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and Co-Chairman of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee. He is also President of the Board of Overseers of Harvard University and a member of the Council of the National Academy of Engineering. He has previously served on numerous committees and boards of the National Academies. Dr. Meserve also serves on the boards of PG&E Corporation and TriAlpha Energy Corporation. He wrote the amicus briefs on behalf of the National Academy of Engineering in the Kumho case and on behalf of the National Academy of Sciences in the Daubert case. These landmark cases established the basis for admitting expert testimony into court.